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I 29.88/2-2: H 23 




Historic Furnishings Report 



BUILDING 34/35 



HARPERS FERRY 

National Historical Park/West Virgin 




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PUBLIC UOOUMbUUT 
DEPOSITORY ITEM 

OCT 4 1925 

CLEMSON 
LIBRARY 



U.S. Department of the Interior/National Park Service 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/historicfurnishiOOcrai 



HISTORIC FURNISHINGS REPORT 



BUILDING 34/35 



Harpers Ferry National Historical Park 
Harpers Ferry, West Virginia 



by 



Patricia Craig 
Shelley Kaplan 
Carol Petravage 



National Park Service 

Harpers Ferry Center 

Division of Historic Furnishings 

1995 



APPROVED 

Robert Stanton 

Regional Director, National Capital Region 

July 12, 1994 



n 



V 



CONTENTS 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS xi 

ADMINISTRATIVE DATA 1 

LOCATION AND PROPOSED USE 1 

INTRODUCTION 6 

BUILDING 34/35 8 

ANALYSIS OF HISTORIC OCCUPANCY 8 

Construction and Early Use (1812-1858) 8 

The Civil War Period (1859-1870) 11 

The McGraw Years (1870-1898) 14 

The Doran Years (1899-1953) 24 

Chronology of Building Use: Building 34/35 27 

PART I - THE PROVOST MARSHAL'S OFFICE 30 

ANALYSIS OF HISTORIC OCCUPANCY 30 

General Duties and Organization 30 

The Provost Marshal in Harpers Ferry 32 

EVIDENCE OF ORIGINAL FURNISHINGS 37 

Discussion of Sources 37 

Evidence Specific to Harpers Ferry 39 

Government Regulations 42 

Other Provost Marshals 42 

FURNISHINGS PLAN 44 

Overview 44 

Interpretive Objectives and Operating Plan 47 

Working Drawing 49 

Recommended Furnishings (Room 103, front of Building 34) .... 50 

Working Drawing 53 

Recommended Furnishings (Room 104, back of Building 34) .... 54 

Concept for Interpretive Panels 57 

PART II - THE GENERAL STORE 58 

ANALYSIS OF HISTORIC OCCUPANCY 58 

General Stores in Harpers Ferry During the 

Mid-Nineteenth Century 58 

Plat with location of general store/dry goods merchants 64 

EVIDENCE OF ORIGINAL FURNISHINGS 65 

Discussion of Sources 65 

Inventories 66 

Advertisements - Harpers Ferry 177 



in 



FURNISHINGS PLAN 189 

Overview 189 

Interpretive Objectives and Operating Plan 189 

Working Drawing 191 

Recommended Furnishings 192 

Concept for Interpretive Panels 205 

PART III - STIPES' BOARDING HOUSE 206 

ANALYSIS OF HISTORIC OCCUPANCY 206 

EVIDENCE OF ORIGINAL FURNISHINGS for James Taylor's Room . 209 

Discussion of Sources 209 

Excerpts from Taylor's Sketchbook 209 

Interior of James E. Taylor's Room 211 

FURNISHINGS PLAN (James Taylor Room) 212 

Overview 212 

Interpretive Objectives and Operating Plan 212 

Working Drawing 213 

Recommended Furnishings 214 

Concept for Interpretive Panels 215 

EVIDENCE OF ORIGINAL FURNISHINGS for Officer's Quarters ... 216 

Discussion of Sources 216 

Excerpt from the Deed of Trust of James B. Wager to 

Isaac Fouke 216 

FURNISHINGS PLAN (Officer's Quarters) 219 

Overview 219 

Interpretive Objectives and Operating Plan 219 

Working Drawing 220 

Recommended Furnishings 221 

Concept for Interpretive Panels 223 

ILLUSTRATIONS 224 

APPENDIXES 324 

APPENDIX A: Inventories of the McGraw Family 324 

APPENDIX B: Excerpt from Quarterly Issues of Stationery, 

Revised Army Regulations of 1861 (1863) 328 

APPENDIX C: List of Forms and Selected Examples 

from the Provost Marshal General Regulations (1863) . . . 330 
APPENDIX D: Pass from the Harpers Ferry Military District, 

dated Jan. 2, 1865 344 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 346 



iv 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 



Cover. Rendering of the exterior of building 34/35 by The Architectural Art, Inc. for 

Harpers Ferry National Historical Park. Original illustration on display in the 
park. 

Figure 1. "Three views of Harpers Ferry," March 11, 1865. 

Figure 2. Harper's Ferry from Loudoun Heights, 1892-95. 

Figure 3. Mr. Doran & his store, ca. 1910. 

Figure 4. High Street, Harpers Ferry. Original location of provost marshal's office. 

Figure 5. Floor plan (not to scale) of High Street building in which provost marshal's office 

was located, Harpers Ferry. 

Figure 6. Citizens of Charleston, S.C., Taking the Oath of Allegiance Soon After the 

Evacuation of the City by General Hardee, from The American Soldier in the Civil 
War. 

Figure 7. Issuing Passes at St. Louis, from Harper's Pictorial History of the Civil War. 

Figure 8. Capture of Savannah — General Geary Issuing Passes to Citizens of Savannah, GA, 

from Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, January 21, 1865. 

Figure 9. Registered Enemies Taking The Oath of Allegiance At The Office Of Gen. Bowen, at 

New Orleans, from a sketch by Mr. J.R. Hamilton. Harpers Weekly, June 6, 1863. 

Figure 10. Provost Marshal's Office, Alexandria [Va.], from Miller's, The Photographic History 

of the Civil War, vol. 8. 

Figure 11. The Provo Marshal's Office on East Side of Loudoun Street North of Water St. 

[Winchester, Va.], from Taylor's The James E. Taylor Sketchbook. 

Figure 12. "Fugitive slaves mingle with Federal troops outside a provost marshal's office at 

Aquia Creek, Virginia, in 1862...." (modern caption), from the Time-Life series, The 
Civil War: Spies, Scouts and Raiders, vol. 18. 

Figure 13. Sherman's Campaign — Provost Marshal's Office, Atlanta [Ga.] — Citizens Getting 

Passes To Go North and South, In Consequence of Gen. Sherman's Order For The 
Departure of All Citizens, from Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, October 29, 
1864. 

Figure 14. The Military Authorities at Washington, DC, Examining Passes in 1861, from Frank 

Leslie's Illustrated History of the Civil War. 

Figure 15. Provost-Marshal's Office, Department of the Cumberland, from Miller, The 

Photographic History of the Civil War, vol. 7. 



Figure 16. Headquarters of Provost-Marshal-General, Defenses South of the Potomac, from 

Miller, The Photographic History of the Civil War, vol. 7. 

Figure 17. General Lew Wallace Considering My Case [Baltimore, Md.], August 8, 1864. From 

Taylor's The James E. Taylor Sketchbook. 

Figure 18. General Sheridan writing his dispatch to General Grant, announcing his victory, at 

Miss Wright's desk [Winchester, Va.], from Taylor's The James E. Taylor 
Sketchbook. 

Figure 19. Sheridan Reading Mosby's Pronunciamento [Winchester, Va.], from Taylor's The 

James E. Taylor Sketchbook. 

Figure 20. General Sheridan and the "Horse" Question [Lockwood House, Harpers Ferry, WV], 

from Taylor's The James E. Taylor Sketchbook. 

Figure 21. General Rosecranz, Commanding The Department Of Western Virginia, Surrounded 

by His Staff, at Their Headquarters, Clarksburg, VA — From a Sketch by Our 
Special Artist with General Rosencranz's Command, from Frank Leslie's Illustrated 
History of the Civil War. 

Figure 22. John Brown arraigned before Judge Richard Parker to be Sentenced States the 

Motives for his invading Virginia [Courthouse, Charles Town, now WV], from 
Taylor's The James E. Taylor Sketchbook. 

Figure 23. Plausible cartoon. 

Figure 24. Painting, The Long Bill, by James Henry Beard, 1840. 

Figure 25. Billhead, H.L. Vervalin & Co., Rochester, N.Y., 1862. 

Figure 26. Lithograph, Interior of a Country Store, drawn by Sol Eytinge, Jun., from a sketch 

by Miss Mary L. Stone. Reproduced in Harper's Weekly, April 20, 1872. 

Figure 27. Letterhead, "Montony & Schoonmaker," Troy, N.Y., 1868. 

Figure 28. Painting, Village Post Office, by Thomas Waterman Wood, 1873. 

Figure 29. Account Book Cover, "W.H. Bullock," 1870-90. 

Figure 30. Painting, The Country Store, by Winslow Homer, 1872. 

Figure 31. Advertisement, "Interior of a Dry Goods House," James Beck & Co., New York, 

NY., 1855-75. 

Figure 32. Wood engraving of store interior by Alexander Anderson. 

Figure 33. Sutler's Store, Fort Dodge, Kansas, 1867. From Harpers Weekly. May 25, 1867. 

Figure 34. Interior of Country Store, 1869. From Hearth and Home, vol. 1, no. 27, June 26, 

1869. 



VI 



Figure 35. Exterior of a Country Store, 1869. From Hearth and Home, vol. 1, no. 38, 

September 11, 1869. 

Figure 36. Advertisement, "Inside View of Retail Grocery Using Standard Barrel Trucks," 

1875-95. 

Figure 37. Print, On Main Street, by Jennie Brownscombe, 1880-1900. 

Figure 38. Print, The Country Store: A Typical Scene Found by the Artist Near Kennebunk, 

ME, by Abbott Graves, 1897. 

Figure 39. Account Book Cover, "Bennett & Sissin, Valley Farm," ca. 1895. 

Figure 40. Billhead, "L.D. & J. Collins, Jr. Forwarding and Commission Merchants," West 

Troy, N.Y., 1868. 

Figure 41. Advertisement, "Fox & Woodford, Wholesale and Retail Grocers," 1870-90. 

Figure 42. Billhead, "H.B. Foster, Wholesale & Retail Dealer," Concord, N.H., 1853. 

Figure 43. Billhead, "R. Thompson, Dealer in Dry Goods, Ready-made Clothing, Flour, Grain 

and Groceries," Warner, N.H., 1869. 

Figure 44. Officer's Quarters in a casemate at Fort Monroe, Virginia, ca. 1861-1865. 

Figure 45. Officer's Quarters at Fort Sumter, South Carolina. From a sketch by an officer on 

Major Anderson's staff. Harpers Weekly, February 23, 1861. 

Figure 46. Lt. Col. W. C. Ward's Quarters, 1861. Drawn by Alfred Waud. 

Figure 47. The General's Room in Larrick's Hotel, from Taylor's The James E. Taylor 

Sketchbook. 

Figure 48. General Sheridan's Personelle [sic], from Taylor's The James E. Taylor Sketchbook. 

Figure 49. Interior of the home of Mr. Joseph Denny, in Winchester, Virginia, from Taylor's 

The James E. Taylor Sketchbook. 



vn 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 



The production of this report was a truly collaborative effort. Shelley Kaplan 
researched and wrote the historical data sections on the provost marshal's office. 
Pat Craig researched and wrote the history of Building 34/35, and located the 
illustration of James Taylor's room. Pat also conducted some general research on 
dry goods stores and collected dry goods inventories from Jefferson County. Carol 
Petravage continued the research on dry goods stores, collected inventories from 
Loudoun County, wrote the furnishings plans for both structures, the Taylor 
exhibit, and the Officer's Quarters, and compiled the final report. Bill Brown 
reviewed the furnishings plan for the provost marshal's office and suggested 
improvements to the Taylor exhibit. Kam Sloan and Karen Matson edited the 
document for publication, and Brenda Hooper assisted with inventory 
transcription. 

The indexing of information in Jefferson County census and property records and 
newspapers continues to be a tremendous resource during the preparation of the 
Harpers Ferry furnishings reports. Pat Chickering, Stan Bumgardner, and Mike 
Jenkins have provided the Division of Historic Furnishings with countless leads 
and valuable advice, as well as sharing the results of their extensive research. 
The authors of this volume thank them for their continued support. 

Carol Petravage 
Pat Craig 
Shelley Kaplan 



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ADMINISTRATIVE DATA 



LOCATION AND PROPOSED USE 

Harpers Ferry National Historical Park, originally called Harpers Ferry National 
Monument, was established by Congress in 1944 to be "a public memorial 
commemorating historical events at or near Harpers Ferry" (Public Law 386). 
According to the Interpretive Prospectus, approved in 1980, two of the major 
themes to be interpreted in the lower town are the Civil War and industrial 
history. 

Building 34 is located on the south side of Shenandoah Street in lower town 
Harpers Ferry. In 1973, Harpers Ferry NHP furnished Building 34 as a living 
history civil war recruiting office, representing a function which existed in 
Building 35 prior to the war. 1 The Interpretive Prospectus states that " building 
34, now furnished as a recruiting office, will instead be converted to a provost 
marshal's office of the war era. This officer would have served as liaison with the 
remaining civilian population and performed military police duties. Furnishings 
would have been sparse and plain, very similar to the current furnishings. The 
objective is to change the emphasis from recruiting to Harpers Ferry as an 
occupied town." 2 Harpers Ferry NHP staff replaced the recruiting office exhibit 
in 1982 with a provost marshal's office exhibit. 3 The front room represents a 
provost marshal's office, with the back room as a temporary detainment space for 
prisoners. 4 When the site is staffed, usually by costumed interpreters, the visitor 
is allowed to enter the building. At other times, interpretive panels are placed in 
the doorway and the entrance is chained. 



1 No evidence has been found which substantiates former park historian Charles Snell's supposition that the recruiting office 
function continued in the town at all during the war. National Park Service, Historic Building Report, Part II, Historical Data 
Section, Building Nos. 34-35, 32, 33, and34A, prepared by Charles W. Snell (Harpers Ferry National Monument March 4, 1959), 
pp. 24-25 [hereafter cited as HFNM). As Dennis Frye, Chief of Interpretation at Harpers Ferry National Historical Park 
(hereafter cited as HFNHP) has noted, given that Harpers Ferry was "enemy territory" during the war, this function would not 
have been logical. Telephone interview, September 19, 1990. 

2 National Park Service, Interpretive Prospectus: Harpers Ferry National Historical Park, Harpers Ferry Center, 1980, 
p. 18. 

3 Although a card for each object installed in the room exists in the park files, no historic furnishings report was completed. 
The furnishing was based on a general knowledge of provost marshals and military interiors; further research was limited by 
the expediency required for furnishing. Bill Brown, Staff Curator, Historic Furnishings, Harpers Ferry Center, July 16, 1990. 

4 Research into the Harpers Ferry provost operations has revealed no evidence that prisoners were kept in the provost 
marshal's office. The only evidence for non-staff sleeping in the office was the instance of two confederate deserters and their 
wives; the Moulton description of the event, along with other descriptions of treatment of confederate deserters after Lincoln's 
offer of amnesty to such soldiers argues that these visitors would not have been treated as prisoners. Charles Moulton to Fannie 
Moulton, December 20, 1863; to Frank Moulton, December 27, 1863, typescripts of original letters prepared by Lee and Karen 
Drickamer on deposit at HFNHP. 



Officially, the office is interpreted to the 1863-65 period, although documents from 
throughout the war are posted there. Since the last refurnishing, new 
documentation— primarily the Charles Moulton material—has become available 
which, combined with comparative research, will provide a more accurate 
furnishings plan and fuller interpretation. This Furnishings Report provides the 
historical documentation and recommends the changes necessary to accurately 
portray a Civil War era provost marshal's office. This furnished building will help 
to interpret the military presence that influenced so much of civilian life in 
Harpers Ferry during the Civil War. 

Building 35 also stands on the south side of Shenandoah Street and shares the 
eastern wall of Building 34. The Interpretive Prospectus recommends that this 
structure continue to be interpreted as a general store, since "the general store 
merchandise will relate to the type of clientele in this 'government town' and to 
the types of transportation that would have brought it here: canal and railroad." 5 
This Furnishings Report examines the role of dry goods and general merchandise 
stores in the Harpers Ferry/Bolivar area during the mid-nineteenth century, and 
ties the furnishings of the front room in this building to the inventory of a specific 
general store. The rear wall of this front room will be moved towards the rear of 
the building to its historic location. The rear portion of Building 35, currently 
interpreted as a storeroom, will be used for a newly constructed elevator and fire 
stair. 

In the course of researching these buildings, researchers identified an illustration 
of a bedroom on the top floor of Building 35, drawn in 1864 by the occupant, 
James Taylor, a war correspondent boarding in the house. Illustrations of 
Harpers Ferry Civil War interiors are quite rare, and park staff and researchers 
agreed that installing a furnished exhibit on the second floor of Building 35 
showing Taylor's room would increase visitors' understanding of the effect of the 
war on the town and the role of war correspondents in visually bringing the war 
home to people living far from the front. 

A furnished exhibit portraying a Civil War officer's quarters will occupy the large 
front room on the second floor of Building 34. The two areas to be furnished are 
connected by a small, inner room which will house interpretive exhibits. These 
exhibits, together with the James Taylor room and the Civil War officer's quarters, 
will convey to visitors the boarding house character of the upper floors of this 
building during the Civil War. 



NFS, Interpretive Prospectus, p. 24. 



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Floor Plans for First Floor 




Floor Plans for Second Floor 



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The following planning documents affect the use and management of Building 
34/35: 

IDLCS: 00557 (Buildings 34 and 35), Management Category A, must be 
preserved. Harpers Ferry National Historic Park was entered on the National 
Register October 15, 1966. 

"Historic Building Report, Part I, Building Nos. 34-35 and 32 and 34A," Harpers 
Ferry National Monument. October 1957. 

"Historic Building Report, Part II, Historical Data Section, Buildings Nos. 34-35, 
32, 33 and 34A," Harpers Ferry National Monument. March 4, 1959. 

"Development Concept Plan, Harpers Ferry National Historical Park," Harpers 
Ferry Center. 1978. 

Interpretive Prospectus, Harpers Ferry National Historical Park, Harpers Ferry 
Center. 1980. 

Historic Structures Report: Archaeological Component. Package 116, Denver 
Service Center. November 1989 

HAFE Package 116, Historic Structures Report, History Section, Block B, Lots 2 
and 3, Shenandoah Street, Park Buildings 32, 33, 33 A, 34/35, 34A, and 36, 
Harpers Ferry National Historical Park, Harpers Ferry, West Virginia. Based on 
the preliminary report of Perry G. Fisher, July 1989. A Cooperative Agreement 
between the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service and 
University of Maryland. Denver Service Center. 1992. 



INTRODUCTION 



Historic furnishings planning for Harpers Ferry National Historical Park provides 
a variety of challenges because of the complex physical and cultural resources 
encompassed by the historic district of the lower town. The unique problems faced 
in the planning process for Building 34/35 required frequent consultation with 
park staff and planning documents to assure that we were effectively meeting the 
stated objectives for the park. 

The Interpretive Prospectus cites four major themes for interpretation: the John 
Brown raid, industrial history, the Civil War, and black education. These themes 
are clearly centered in the early to mid-nineteenth century. The majority of the 
existing structures in the lower town were constructed or significantly altered 
during the late nineteenth century, leaving only fragmentary traces of the early or 
Civil War era town. The greatest historic furnishings challenge at Harpers Ferry 
NHP is reconciling the interpretive goals with historic use and the preservation 
needs of the physical structures located within the park. 

The approach taken in this project combined research regarding historical 
occupancy and use of the structures with research in specified theme topics. It 
was decided through consultation with park and regional office staff that 
whenever possible, research in historical occupancy and use would serve as the 
foundation for the planning of historic interiors. In those structures where the 
chronology of use did not further park interpretive themes, historic interiors would 
be furnished based upon room functions researched and documented to other 
structures whose historic uses were more pertinent to the designated themes. 

Historical occupancy and use for the project structures was determined through an 
analysis of available primary documents and existing research reports. New 
evidence obtained from primary documents previously unavailable was 
incorporated into the historical data section. 

In 1982, park staff informally installed a provost marshal's office in Building 34 
after perceiving the need for an exhibit that would interpret to the visitor the 
impact of the military presence in Harpers Ferry during the Civil War. Visitors 
have responded favorably to the interpretation presented in this historically 
furnished interior. The original location of the provost marshal's office is a 
privately owned commercial building on High Street that is unavailable for use by 
the park. Therefore, regional, park, and historic furnishings staff determined that 
the continued use of Building 34 as a historically furnished provost marshal's 
office addressed critical interpretive themes in the most heavily visited corridor of 
the park. 



6 



Building 35 existed during the Civil War but was radically altered both inside and 
out during the late nineteenth century. Historical research indicates that Mrs. 
Cornelia Stipes operated a boarding house in Building 35 for all or part of the 
Civil War period. In an effort to interpret industrial history as well as trade and 
transportation issues, the park installed a general merchandise or dry goods store 
on the first floor of Building 35 in 1973. This furnished interior enables the park 
to interpret changes in consumer goods that occurred during the 1850s because of 
the rise of industrialization and improvements in transportation networks. Park 
staff feel that devoting the entire structure to the interpretation of a boarding 
house would deprive them of a particularly effective interpretive tool; therefore, 
regional, park, and historic furnishings staff determined that continuing to 
interpret the first floor of Building 35 as a general merchandise store best served 
the interpretive goals as stated in the Interpretive Prospectus. The rear room, 
currently interpreted as a storeroom, will be used for an elevator and fire stair. 

However, recent research has identified pictorial documentation for one of the 
rooms in Building 35 during its use as a boarding house during the Civil War. 
Park interpretive staff are excited at the prospect of interpreting this part of the 
building's history as well. Therefore, the historic furnishings plan provides for the 
second floor room in the northeast corner of Building 35 to be interpreted as the 
room of James Taylor. Taylor, a newspaper correspondent and artist, included in 
his sketchbook a drawing of the room in Building 35 where he stayed during the 
Civil War. Since research indicates that Civil War officers also lived in the 
upstairs rooms, the second floor room in the front of Building 34 will be 
historically furnished as an officer's quarters. 

Because the past, present, and proposed uses of Building 34/35 are so complex, 
this historic furnishings report is organized as follows. The following chapter 
summarizes the architectural history and discusses in greater detail the social 
history of Building 34/35. Part I outlines the role of the provost marshal in 
Harpers Ferry and includes a furnishings plan for Building 34 based on evidence 
for provost marshal's office interiors in Harpers Ferry and elsewhere. Part II 
examines the role of the general merchandise or dry goods store in mid-nineteenth 
century Harpers Ferry and includes a furnishings plan for the front room of 
Building 35 based on an 1854 Loudoun County store inventory. Part III briefly 
describes Stipes' boarding house, including James Taylor's role as a visual reporter 
for Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper. It includes the evidence Taylor left 
behind that enables the park service to accurately reproduce his room, as well as 
the site specific and comparative evidence for a Civil War era officer's quarters. 
Part III also includes furnishings plans for both rooms. 



BUILDING 34/35 

ANALYSIS OF HISTORIC OCCUPANCY 

Construction and Early Use (1812-1858) 

In a letter dated April 4, 1812, Samuel Annin, paymaster and military storekeeper 
of the Harpers Ferry Armory, requested permission for his son, Joseph, to erect a 
small brick building on armory land for the purpose of operating an apothecary. 6 
The secretary of war granted permission in a letter dated May 12, 1812. 7 The 
young Annin erected a two-story brick building measuring approximately 23 by 34 
feet, which he used as an apothecary store and dwelling. 8 This building forms the 
core of what is known today as Building 35. After resigning from his position as 
paymaster in 1815, Samuel Annin moved into this building with his son. 

In 1816, Annin complained that the new paymaster of the armory had granted 
permission to Basil Williamson, a Harpers Ferry hotel and tavern keeper, to erect 
a tavern house upon the same lot as himself, impacting the existing structure. 
The proposed new building would require Annin to remove the existing porch on 
the west end, which provided a covering for the steps leading down into the cellar 
kitchen. It would also eliminate his garden area to the west of the dwelling. 9 
Annin proved persuasive in his arguments to the War Department as the proposed 
lease to Williamson was cancelled on April 21, 1816. 10 

Samuel Annin and his son probably left the Harpers Ferry residence by the end of 
1818. n Their departure resulted in an exchange of letters between the Ordnance 
Department, War Department, and the armory superintendent which sought to 
resolve Joseph Annin's claims for compensation of the construction costs for this 



6 Letter from Samuel Annin to William Eustis, secretary of war, April 4, 1812, quoted in National Park Service, "Historic 
Building Report, Part II, Historical Data Section, Bldgs. No. 34-35, 32, 33 and 34A. The Samuel Annin House, Lot No. 3, Block 
B, Shenandoah Street," prepared by Charles W. Snell (unpublished manuscript, HFNM, March 4, 1959), p. 3. 

7 Letter from William Eustis, secretary of war, to Joseph Annin, May 12, 1812, quoted in NPS, "Historic Building Report, 
Part II, Historical Data Section. ..The Samuel Annin House," p. 3. 

8 National Park Service, A Comprehensive History of Armory Dwelling Houses of the U.S. Armory and Harper's Ferry, 
Virginia, 1798-1884. In Three Volumes. Harpers Ferry NHP, WV. A History of the Construction, Repair, Improvement and 
Acquisition of Armory Dwelling Houses, 1798-1841, prepared by Charles W. Snell (Denver, CO: Denver Service Center/National 
Capitol Team, November 1981), vol 1, p. 44. 

' Letter from Samuel Annin to Maj. John Graham, February 8, 1816, quoted in NPS, "Historic Building Report, Part II, 
Historical Data Section. ..The Samuel Annin House." pp. 4-5. 

10 NPS, "Historic Building Report, Part II, Historical Data Section. ..The Samuel Annin Hous. 

11 Ibid., p. 6. 

s 



building. The information contained in the various letters suggests that the 
federal government finally re-secured its claim to the building and lot by 1821, 12 
and began using the structure as quarters for the master armorer. 

An 1821 survey of buildings at the United States Armory at Harpers Ferry 
describes Building 35 as "One Dwelling House, 36 by 26 feet, two stories and a 
cellar. Built of Brick. Estimated Value: $2,500." 13 

The front room on the first floor of Building 34 (room 103) was probably built 
between 1818 and 1827. 14 In 1827, a "kitchen for the Master Armorer's 20 by 22 
feet, 1 story brick..." was constructed. This kitchen probably appears on an 1835 
Winchester and Potomac Railroad map attached to the southwest corner of 
Building 34/35. 15 Building 34/35 was enlarged to a two-and-a-half-story building 
with six dormer windows in 1837. 16 Room 204 was probably added at this 
time. 17 

Ordnance Department receipts document the maintenance performed on the 
dwelling. One workman was paid for eight days work repairing, plastering, and 
whitewashing; the next month a carpenter was contracted to repair the flooring in 
the house and kitchen, constructing new window frames and shutters for the 
front, putting in stops, and repairing all doors and windows. He made three 
clothes presses. On the exterior of the property, the carpenter constructed 47 feet 
of paling fence base and cap and hung one gate. 18 The annual report of 
government property issued for the year July 1, 1850, to June 30, 1851, notes that 



12 Ibid., p. 7. 

13 Ibid., p. 8. 

14 Most of the woodwork in this room dates to the first quarter of the 19th century. Architectural plans indicate that the 
three walls of room 103 were built against the existing structure, and the door between them was made by enlarging an existing 
window. From National Park Service, "Harpers Ferry Buildings 34 and 35, Observations Concerning Historic Interior Fabric," 
prepared by Michael F. Trostel, (undated preliminary report [1993], doc. no. HFD-676), p. 1. 

15 "Map of Harpers Ferry, showing the location of the Winchester and Potomac Railroad, Drawn by Lieuts. White Allen and 
R.S. Smith, U.S. Army, Under the Direction of James Kearney, Lt. Col. and T.K. Map no. 2-1835. Approved by President 
Andrew Jackson, January 27, 1835." National Archives & Records Administration, Records Group 77 [hereafter cited as NARA, 
RG]. Records of the Office of the Chief of Engineers. Fortification Map file, part of Map Drawer no. 150, Sheet 82-2. 
Reproduced as Appendix II in NPS, "Historic Building Report, Part II, Historical Data Section. ..The Samuel Annin House." 

16 NPS, A Comprehensive History of Armory Dwelling Houses..., p. 170. 

17 Greek Revival door and window casings in this room clearly indicate that room 204 was added to building 34/35 many 
years after the first floor (room 103) was built, probably in the 1830s or 40s. See NPS, "Harpers Ferry Buildings 34 and 35, 
Observations Concerning Historic Interior Fabric," p. 2. 

18 National Park Service, HAFE Package 116, Historic Structures Report, History Section, Block B, Lots 2 and 3, Shenandoah 
Street, Park Buildings 32, 33, 33A, 34/35, 34A, and 36, Harpers Ferry National Historical Park, Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, 
prepared by Patricia Chickering with Michael A. Jenkins (through a Cooperative Agreement between the U.S. Department of 
Interior, NPS, and University of Maryland), p. 11. Based on the preliminary report of Perry G Fisher, July 1989. 



the master armorer's house received two coats of patent oil paint on its exterior, 
and that lightning rods had been installed. 19 An 1854 letter from the Chief of 
Ordnance, Col. Henry K. Craig to Armory Superintendent W.H. Bell, ordered Bell 
to make "such repairs on the house recently occupied by Mr. Burton, as are 
necessary to fit it for the new Master Armorer...." 20 The condition of Building 
34/35 apparently deteriorated during the mid- to late 1850s: 

Major Byington stated to me while he lived in the House about 1858 or 1859, that 

21 

he was fearful that it would fall in whenever he went in the upper part of it. 

The apparent lack of maintenance may have been due to the recession being 
experienced at the armory. A board of officers that met in Harpers Ferry in 1851 
had recommended to the secretary of war that surplus land and buildings 
belonging to the armory be sold. The board mentioned Building 34/35 in its report 
as follows: 

The Master Armorer and Clerks now occupy houses on ground which should be 
sold; these houses should be reserved from the sale until suitable ones are erected 
for their use. All other dwellings should be removed from the land reserved.... 

The board's recommendation was approved by the secretary of war, and the 
arsenal yard (in which the master armorer's house was located) was subdivided, 
although the lots were not included in the 1852 sale of government lands. With 
the money raised from the sale of lots and buildings, it was proposed that new 
quarters be constructed for the officers of the armory. 23 

The secretary of war did not approve this suggestion, and construction plans were 
abandoned for the next four years. In 1856, however, the issue of new residences 
for the armory was again raised and this time approved. A joint resolution was 
passed by Congress in 1856 which authorized the secretary of war to apply the 
funds from the 1852 government sale to permanent improvements at the armory. 



19 NPS, "Historic Building Report, Part II, Historical Data Section. ..The Samuel Annin House," pp. 9-10. 

20 Craig to Ball, April 10, 1854, as quoted in NPS, "Historic Building Report, Part II. Historical Data Section. ..The Samuel 
Annin House," p. 10. 

21 Affidavit of Jesse W. Graham, June 14, 1878, Harpers Kerry Abatement Cases, as quoted in 
NPS, "Historic Building Report, Part II, Historical Data Section. ..The Samuel Annin House." p. 11. 

22 Report of a Board of Officers, September 24, 1851, as quoted in NPS, "Historic Building Report, Part II, Historical Data 
Section. ..The Samuel Annin House," p. 17. 

23 NPS, "Historic Building Report, Part II, Historical Data Section. ..The Samuel Annin House," pp. 17-19. 

10 



Consequently, planning began for the construction of three new dwellings, 
including a new master armorer's house, located adjacent to Building 34/35. 24 

The old house is on the same lot, and very near to one of its [Building 36's] gables, 
and is quite in a dilapidated condition. The outhouses attached to the old house, 
are wanted for the use of the new one; if the old house is retained, new outhouses 
will have to be built for the new house.... Besides the materials in the old house can 
be very profitably employed in the construction of outhouses for the new Quarters 
on the Hill.... I therefore recommend the pulling down of this house and the saving 
of the materials, as above named. 

When Samuel Byington resigned as master armorer in 1858, his replacement 
Benjamin Mills arranged a swap of residences with the paymaster's clerk, John E. 
Daingerfield, in which Daingerfield would live in Building 34/35 until the adjacent 
dwelling was completed. 26 Daingerfield moved into the new residence by July 
1859. 27 



The Civil War Period (1859-1870) 

As a direct consequence of the attack of John Brown's Raiders on the arsenal in 
1859, Superintendent Barbour requested that army regulars be stationed at 
Harpers Ferry for protection. Troops arrived in town in November. In a letter 
dated November 8, 1859, from George Mauzy to James H. Burton, a former 
master armorer at Harpers Ferry, Mauzy states that 

Your old quarters are now used as a recruiting station by Capt. Burton, there is a 
Co. of Soldiers, who were sent here from Govs. Island to protect Government 

28 

property.... 

Building 34/35 was probably used as a recruiting station until April 1860, when 
Captain Burton and his men withdrew from Harpers Ferry. 29 



24 Ibid., p. 21. 

25 Superintendent Alfred M. Barbour to Col. Henry K. Craig, July 16, 1859, as quoted in NPS, "Historic Building Report, 
Part II, Historical Data Section.. The Samuel Annin House," p. 22. 



lit; 



U7 



■jh 



1'1> 



NPS, "Historic Building Report, Part II, Historical Data Section. ..The Samuel Annin House," p. 22. 

Ibid. 

Ibid., p. 24. 

Ibid. 

11 



The stable may have been used by a nonresident of Building 34/35 during this 
period. When James McGraw sold a business in 1861 to his nephew, Patrick, two 
of the items listed in the conveyance were a "stable & ice house near the Market 
House at Harper's Ferry." 30 Lot 3, Block B, where the stable associated with the 
master armorer's dwelling is located, is directly in front of the market house lot, 
and therefore may be the stable referred to in the deed. 

Other documented uses of Building 34/35 reflect civilian use and occurred during 
the last years of the war. The journal entries of James E. Taylor, a war 
correspondent traveling with the Sheridan campaign through the Shenandoah 
Valley in 1864, indicate that Mrs. Cornelia Stipes operated a hotel or boarding 
house in the structure. During the Civil War, the provost marshal granted 
licenses and rented vacant buildings to traders and sutlers who applied for 
permission to sell goods or operate businesses in Harpers Ferry. The money 
obtained from these rentals was given to the surgeons to benefit the sick and 
wounded. 31 When Taylor arrived in Harpers Ferry, he was led to a hotel by a 
young boy and introduced to Mrs. Stipes, the proprietress. Taylor explains that 

Mrs. Stipes catered to sojourners at the Ferry to the extent of table board and 
lodging, not from choice but necessity caused by her husband's business reverses 
owing to the War, and his inability to catch on again, when it fell to the lot of 
Madam to entertain transients to keep the wolf from the door. 

Taylor goes on to describe his room at the hotel: 

I am at once conducted to my quarters, a sky parlor under the slanting roof, the 
only available room unoccupied, but make no 'kick,' thankful at being supplied at 
all, considering the demand at this time by correspondents, army contractors, and 

33 

sutlers for lodgings. 

Taylor later remarks upon how uncomfortable his lodgings are during warm 
weather: 



IWd Book :(9 pp 396-97, Jefferson County Courthouse [hereafter cited as JCC1, Charles Town. West Virginia 

31 Charles H. Banes, History of the Philadelphia Brigade, (Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott & Co., 1876), p. 124. 

32 James E. Taylor, With Sheridan Up the Shenandoah Valley in 1864. Leaves From A Special Artist's Sketch Book and 
Diary [a.k.a. The James E. Taylor Sketchbook], (Cleveland: The Western Reserve Historical Society, 1989), p. 30. This is an 
annotated printing of the original sketchbook. (Hereafter cited as The James E. Taylor Sketchbook.) However, according to 
newspaper accounts, Cornelia Stipes' husband Thomas died of consumption in 1840 (Virginia Free Press, January 29, 1840, p. 
3, col. 3). The 1840 through 1880 censuses list Cornelia Stipes as head of household, indicating that she never remarried (U.S. 
Bureau of the Census, Jefferson County, Virginia: Sixth Census, 1840, p. 243; Seventh Census, 1850, p.409B; Eighth Census 
1860, p. 198; and Jefferson County, West Virginia: Ninth Census, 1870, p. 17; Tenth Census, 1880, p. 3). 

33 Taylor, The James E. Taylor Sketchbook, p. 30. 

12 



Stripped to the buff, for the thermometer ranged in the nineties in my loft, I 
proceed to put a number of special subjects in ship-shape and perspiration oozing 
from my pores without a let-up, except to respond to the supper call, when Wright 
gathers a few more 'crumbs' from me. 

According to Taylor, the dining room for hotel guests was located on a lower floor. 
Next door to the hotel stood the master armorer's house (Building 36), which 
served as army headquarters and was occupied by Brig. Gen. John D. 
Stevenson. 35 Building 34/35 also apparently had a porch, since Taylor mentions 
holding a conversation with two other journalists on one. 36 Although Taylor does 
not pinpoint the location of this porch in his journal entry, his sketch of 
Shenandoah Street shows Stipes' boarding house with a small front portico. 37 He 
also reports leaving his horse in the stable associated with Stipes' boarding 
house. 38 

When Brig. Gen. Edward D. Ramsay inspected the buildings and stores at 
Harpers Ferry in 1865, he described Building 34/35 as follows: 

Dwelling House No. 2 - two story, brick, located on Shenandoah Street. In fair 
condition and occupied as quarters for Officers. 

Mrs. Stipes purchased property two blocks away on Shenandoah Street in April 
1865 and may have moved out of Building 35 at that time. 40 

Mrs. Annie Kirby may have lived in Building 34/35 in the late 1860s. In 1878, the 
current owners of the building, the minor children of James McGraw, stated that 
"Mrs. Kirby occupied the property until the Spring of 1870, and since that time we 
have occupied it with the exception of five or six months." 41 Mrs. Kirby is listed 



34 Ibid., p. 215. 

35 Ibid., p. 30. 

36 Ibid., pp. 42-43. 

37 Ibid., p. 580. 



:is 



Ibid., p. 247. 



39 Ramsay to Brig. Gen. A.B. Dyer, Chief of Ordnance, July 27, 1865, as quoted in NPS, "Historic Building Report, Part II, 
Historical Data Section. ..The Samuel Annin House," p. 25. 

40 Deed Book 1, p. 156, JCC. 

41 "N.T., C.A., and Jas. C. McGraw for Abatement on Purchase of Lot of Land No. 3 Block B at Harpers Ferry," August 6, 
1878, quoted in National Park Service, HAFE Package 116, Historic Structures Report, History Section, p. 14. 

13 



in the 1870 census as a middle-aged milliner with two children. 42 No rental 
agreements have been located for either Mrs. Stipes or Mrs. Kirby. The history of 
occupancy for this building reflects the transience of people in Harpers Ferry 
during the Civil War, and the lack of legal and government documents can 
perhaps be explained by the upheaval in business and social matters caused by 
the war. 



The McGraw Years (1870-1898) 

Building 34/35 was among the lots and structures included in the 1869 sale of 
government properties. The building, located on Lot 3, Block B, was purchased by 
Margaret T., Catherine A., and James C. McGraw, the children of James McGraw, 
for $5,100. 43 The family was probably in residence in Building 34/35 by June 
1870. James McGraw immediately began making improvements upon the 
property. 

Most of the information about McGraw's early years in Building 34/35 comes from 
the records of price abatement hearings held in 1878. Terrible floods in 1870 and 
1877 ruined the hopes of many property owners for revitalizing Harpers Ferry 
after the demise of the armory. Additionally, many lower town lots failed to be 
developed because Capt. F.C. Adams, the major purchaser of government property 
at the 1869 sale, became involved in various chancery cases and in a right of way 
dispute with the B&O Railroad in the 1870s. 44 Consequently, those who paid the 
inflated prices for government property at the sale in 1869 appealed to the 
government for relief based on the current depressed economic conditions in 
Harpers Ferry in the 1870s. McGraw submitted vouchers and an itemized list of 
his expenditures on the property, dating from 1870. Most of his costs in the early 
part of this decade dealt with repairs or modifications to the already existing 
structures, but some indicate adaptations to accommodate the needs of his 
business. 45 

Building 34/35 suffered extensive damage in the September 1870 flood shortly 
after McGraw took up residence. In his testimony on behalf of McGraw and his 
children in their abatement petition, Jesse W. Graham described the condition of 
the lot and buildings prior to McGraw's improvements: 



42 U.S. Bureau of the Census, Ninth Census of the United States (1870), Jefferson County, West Virginia, p. 21. 

43 NPS, HAFE Package 116, Historic Structures Report, History Section, p. 15. 

44 Memorandum from Pat Chickering to Carol Petravage, dated March 16, 1992, p. 1. 

45 NPS, HAFE Package 116, Historic Structures Report, History Section, Appendix 2, pp. 73-75. 

14 



[there was] no pavement in front of the Building or shade Trees, both ends and one 
side wall badly cracked, a badly broken Slate Roof that would make the House 
untenable. Floors sunken, and without the brick pillars put in by Mr. McGraw to 
support the floors, it would have fallen in long ago. There was no outbuildings 
except a small and badly damaged one story kitchen, without floors or 
windows. ..had Mr. McGraw not put in about $1600 worth of repairs, the House 
would have fallen in long ago.... The repairs Mr. McGraw put on the House alone, as 
above stated, and two thousand dollars worth of new out buildings and fencing, 
makes the property look quite valuable, but in its exposed condition from the floods, 
and from its liability to be bodily sweeped away, as the fencing & outbuildings & 
coal and other goods were either damaged or entirely swepted [sic] away from this 
property in 1870 and 1877, few people would care to pay more for the property than 
the amount I have named and take the risk of losing so heavily. Mr. McGraw has 
had a large portion of the House replastered this summer, and built a new Corn 
House and large ware room for coal, goods & c in the yard besides. ..the true value 
of the Building at the time of the purchase was the value of the material in it, it 
being condemned by the United States as unfit for use [sic] . 

Jesse Graham's reference to the coal and other goods that were swept away by 
floods suggests that McGraw had transferred his grocery and hardware business 
from its previous location on the north side of Shenandoah Street. Since it does 
not differentiate between the damage done by the 1870 and 1877 floods, Graham's 
statement alone cannot confirm that the McGraw business was operating on the 
Building 34/35 site during the early 1870s. 

While the location of his store in the early 1870s is still unclear, there is no doubt 
that his business was already well established. The earliest advertisement found 
for James McGraw dates from 1857 and notes the relocation of his grocery and 
liquor business from High Street to the storeroom previously rented by Israel 
Russell (probably building 43). 47 McGraw apparently ran into financial problems 
since he sold his merchandise to his nephew Patrick McGraw on January 14, 
1861, and on January 17 conveyed his personal property in a trust to George N. 
Lynch to secure payments owed to a list of creditors (see Appendix A). 48 The 
inventory of items sold to his nephew indicates that McGraw sold liquor and 
groceries and suggests that he operated a livery as well, since a number of 
vehicles and horses are listed. 49 



46 Ibid., quote found in Appendix 2, pp. 73-75. 

47 Virginia Free Press, July 2, 1857, p. 3, col. 1. 

48 Deed Book 39, pp. 396-97, JCC. 

49 Ibid. Of particular note is a listing for John Brown's horse blind at $20. The obituary for McGraw in a local newspaper 
comments that "he was well acquinted [sic] and had considerable business transactions with John Brown just prior to the Brown 
raid. Brown left his horse with him at the time of his capture to settle some indebtedness." Virginia Free Press, November 1, 
1893, p. 3, col. 2. 

15 



In November 1865, James McGraw advertised in the local press that he had 
erected a "large & commodious stable. [With] Horses & vehicles for hire." 50 It is 
unknown where this stable was built although one possible location was Wager 
Lot 48, which McGraw bought from Noah and Sarah Ann Swayne in August 
1865. 51 Alternately, McGraw may have built his livery on armory land across 
the street (Lot 3, Block B), since there is evidence that he was associated with the 
old stable belonging to Building 34/35. To date, no archeological evidence has 
been found to support a second stable on the lot. 52 McGraw may have rented the 
outbuildings on Lot 3, Block B, prior to his purchase of the property in 1869. 53 

McGraw's claim against the United States quartermaster and commissary stores 
for $3,675.99 worth of merchandise and services taken during the war years 
indicates that he stayed in business during the war. 54 Some of this claim 
undoubtedly derived from his livery business, since horses were in great demand 
throughout the war years. 55 McGraw's livery business is also mentioned in two 
court cases. 56 

After the war, McGraw's emphasis seemed to shift away from the livery trade. 
His purchase of the stock of liquor and other merchandise in the saloon of his 
nephew, Patrick McGraw, in the autumn of 1866 indicates that the liquor trade 
remained an important part of his business. 57 In the late 1860s and early 1870s, 



60 Virginia Free Press, November 9, 1865, p. 3, col. 1. 

51 Deed Book 1, p. 182, JCC. 

62 National Park Service, Historic Structures Report: Archaeological Component. Package 116: Block B, Lot 3, Buildings 
32, 33 A, 33, 34 A, 35, Shenandoah Street, Harpers Ferry National Historical Park, Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, prepared by 
Paul A. Shackel (draft, HFNHP, November 1989), pp. 10-14. 

3 McGraw had a history of purchasing property after leasing it. After living on High St. (Wager Lot 26) during the Civil 
War, he later purchased the property in the 1869 government sale. See Joseph Barry, The Strange Story of Harper's Ferry, With 
Legends of the Surrounding Country, (Martinsburg, WV: Thompson Brothers, 1903; reprint Harpers Ferry, WV: The Woman's 
Club of Harpers Ferry District, 1979), p. 130, for a description of McGraw's High Street residence; see the Virginia Free Press, 
December 6, 1869, p. 2, col. 1, for a record of the 1869 sale. 

M NARA, RG 123. CD 9183. Index of Claims, Quartermaster General Office. Material at Archives Annex, Suitland, 
Maryland. Documentation for the 1892 claim indicates that papers concerning the earlier claim were returned to attorneys in 
Washington "at their request" in May 1871, with the information that the claim had been four times rejected, and that in 1892 
"...it does not appear that any papers are on file in the Miscellaneous Division |of the Treasury Department! touching the 
question of the loyalty of the said McGrau Isic]." 

5 James Taylor had great difficulty in securing a mount while staying in Harpers Ferry. Taylor, The James E Taylor 
Sketchbook, pp. 38-43. 

s See Debt Appeal, 1866, James McGraw vs. Thomas A. Kirwan, Circuit Court, JCC. An overview of the depositions 
suggests that Kirwan frequently hired horses and buggies from McGraw. Average cost of keeping a horse at McGraw's stable 
was $0.75/day. Rental of a horse or buggy was $3/day or $5/day for both. See also Debt Appeal, James McGraw vs. Joseph 
Myers, September 22, 1873, Circuit Court, JCC. 

67 Deed Book 1, p. 436, JCC. 

16 



McGraw's newspaper advertisements emphasize groceries, liquor, and coal. As 
McGraw's business affairs prospered, he invested a portion of the money he 
earned into improvements on the Lot 3, Block B, property. In the early 1870s, he 
made repairs on the sewer and cistern in the rear yard and he installed a pump. 
He also repaired the roof, gutters, downspouts, and missing window panes; on the 
interior he re-plastered. 58 

McGraw also rebuilt the old stable on the property. In his abatement claim he 
submitted an itemized list of costs incurred that included an entry for removing a 
stable from off the road. 59 This entry probably refers to the damage caused by 
the 1870 flood which swept most of the outbuildings off the property. Apparently 
the framed portion of the structure settled down in Market Street, requiring its 
removal by McGraw. 

Seven years after the 1870 flood, McGraw spent $600 to build an ice, carriage and 
coal house, probably on the foundations of the old stable. During investigations 
conducted around Building 32, archeologists uncovered an 1866 penny in a 
builders' trench, supporting a construction date of at least 1866. The archeologists 
concluded that 

the bottom 2.7 ft. ..of the foundation probably related to an earlier building. In 
1877, McGraw built his 'Ice/Carriage/Coal' house, probably accounting for the 

f\C\ 

coarse building layer above the finely finished foundation he reused. 

The measurements of the currently existing structure are approximately the same 
as those of the old stable. 61 A photograph from 1892-95 shows a two-story shed 
off the main structure at the back of the lot that was clearly used for the storage 
of coal or other goods directly unloaded from rail cars. 62 

During the abatement proceedings, Jesse Graham testified that McGraw also 
spent $2,000 on constructing new outbuildings and fencing, including a corn house 



58 NPS, HAFE Package 116, Historic Structures Report, History Section, p. 21. 

59 Ibid. 

60 NPS, Historic Structures Report: Archaeological Component. Package 116, pp. 14-15. 

61 NPS, HAFE Package 116, Historic Structures Report, History Section, p. 21. 

62 "Harper's Ferry from Loudoun Heights," HF-99, Historical Photograph Collection, HFNHP. 

17 



and ware room for coal and other goods. 63 A later deed refers to a series of sheds 
located along the back boundary of the property. 64 

As the decade progressed, McGraw continued to expand his business, increasing 
the scope and volume of his coal and hardware lines. A September 1878 
announcement stated that he had recently received 120 tons of cargo in his yard 
from the canal boat, McFannon. 65 He notified the public only two months later 
of shipments of 200 tons of coal, 100 kegs of nails, and 50 kegs of horse and mule 
shoes, among other items. 66 

With the growth of his coal business, McGraw apparently took steps to insure his 
investment. In 1881, R.A. Alexander, an agent for the Aetna Insurance Company, 
reimbursed McGraw $100 for a fire in his coal yard. 67 The coal portion of his 
business continued to increase and ads appeared which listed deliveries of 1,000 
tons in his yard. McGraw was also the successful bidder in 1885 for a contract to 
supply coal for the Jefferson County free schools. 68 

Meanwhile, the abatement claims process dragged on. In February 1880, the 
abatement claim was finally approved, lowering the original purchase price to 
$1,200, although the lot remained unpaid until December 1882. The children 
transferred title to their father on December 4, 1882, but it wasn't until November 
8, 1883, that the deed was finally recorded. 69 

In May 1882, the Virginia Free Press noted that James McGraw had a "large 
fhousel in course of construction." 70 Later that year, the Spirit of Jefferson 
published this account of McGraw's new residence (Building 33): 

It is a massive stone structure, about 36 x 57 feet in size, three stories and an attic 
in height, covered with slate, and with an attractive brown sandstone finish. On 



: ' NFS, IIAFE Package 116, Historic Structures Report, History Section, p. 22. 

"' Deed Book 83, pp. 493-503, JCC. 

65 Spirit of Jefferson , September 3, 1878, p. 2, col. 4. 

66 Ibid . November 12, 1878, p. 2, col. 4. 

" Virginia Free Press, November 19, 1881, p. 3, col. 1. 

68 Spirit of Jefferson, September 15, 1885, p. 3, col. 1. 

09 Deed Book M, p. 205, and Deed Book P, p. 51, JCC. 

70 Virginia Free Press, May 6, 1882, p. 3, col. 1. 



18 



the first floor is a spacious store-room and a large hallway, on the second and third 

7 1 

six rooms each for dwelling purposes, and on the attic floor, four rooms. 

By late 1883 or early 1884, James McGraw had moved his business into the new 
store room in Building 33, and the McGraw family had moved into their new 
residence on the upper floors. 

McGraw rented out his former residence and store, but the information regarding 
the new occupants is sketchy. A close examination of the 1880 census suggests 
that a hat and bonnet-maker, Frances McDonnell, and her sister Annie, may have 
been living in the building at that time. The post office was probably moved from 
Building 36 to Building 34/35 in 1887. 72 Finally, John Koonce may have occupied 
the building as well, since beginning in September 1887, he regularly advertised 
his services as a rental agent, rent collector and a notary, located in the office over 
the post office. 73 

In April 1888, the Spirit of Jefferson announced that 

Mr. James McGraw is fitting up his former residence in Shenandoah street for a 
store room, which will be occupied after the 15th of this month by M. Cohen & Co., 
clothiers. 

Cohen's store may have been located in Building 34 since the post office had 
moved from Building 36 into Building 35 in 1887. 75 Evidence does not indicate 
whether the post office shared its space with another business. 

In the late 1880s, McGraw directed much of his energy towards his new business 
venture, a beer bottling operation, housed in a new two-story building. This 
structure, with its stone foundation and first story, and a framed second story, 
was built directly behind his residence in Building 33. 76 



71 Spirit of Jefferson, November 14, 1882, p. 2, col. 1. 

2 Ibid., August 30, 1887, p. 3, col. 1, notes J. Garland Hurst's preparations to outfit building 36 for his personal occupancy, 
and commented that it had until recently housed the post office. Later references to the Post Office clearly locate it in building 
34/35. See Spirit of Jefferson, July 28, 1891, p. 3, col. 2. 

73 Harper's Ferry Sentinel, December 31, 1887, p. 5, col. 4. 

74 Spirit of Jefferson, April 17, 1888, p. 2, col. 4. 

5 Interpretation of the location of these two functions hinges upon a reference in the Spirit of Jefferson, July 28, 1891, p. 
3, col. 1. The news item comments on the anticipated move of the post office from its present location to a "room west of it, 
newly fitted for that purpose." This would seem to imply that prior to 1891, the post office was located in the eastern half of 
building 34/35, that is, building 35. 

76 NPS, HAFE Package 116, Historic Structures Report, History Section, p. 28. 

19 



By July 1891, McGraw had raised Building 34/35 to three stories and added the 
stuccoed wings in the rear. 77 The newly renovated interior contained a large 
store room plus 30 large rooms intended for a hotel or boarding house. The post 
office, which was probably located in Building 35, was scheduled to move into a 
"room west of it, newly fitted for the purpose." 78 The rooms were painted by 
William Davis by mid-May 1892. The Spirit of Jefferson reported that there were 
"28 rooms besides the post office and store; 57 doors elegantly grained in walnut 
and other items to correspond." 79 This description closely matches the current 
configuration of these buildings. 

McGraw may have added a series of balconies along the rear second story of 
Building 34/35 at this time. Although no balconies are indicated on the Sanborn 
map of 1894, a photograph of Harpers Ferry taken from Loudoun Heights around 
1895 clearly shows the balconies. 80 McGraw may have added the balconies 
between the time that the insurance survey and photograph were taken. 

Meanwhile, McGraw continued to prosper in his business ventures. His son, 
James C., joined him in the business, taking a particular interest in the beverage 
bottling and retailing aspects, and in 1890 James McGraw announced that his son 
was taking over the business from him. 81 

Building 33A was built in the summer of 1888 to serve as a bottling plant. 82 
Building 32 may have been used in the operation as well, as its deep stone 
foundations would have provided a cool storage area. Building 32 was certainly 
part of the bottling operation by 1894, since the Sanborn fire insurance map for 
that year includes the building as part of the beverage bottling operation. 83 

Within three years of relinquishing his position as head of the bottling business, 
James McGraw died. James C. McGraw, acting as the administrator of the senior 
McGraw's estate, estimated its value at $155, 000. 84 



77 Ibid., pp. 30-31. 

78 Spirit of Jefferson, July 28, 1891, p. 3, col. 2. 

79 Ibid., May 17, 1892, p. 3, col. 1. 

80 NPS, HAFE Package 116, Historic Structures Report, History Section, p. 31. 

81 Spirit of Jefferson, May 13, 1890, p. 3, col. 2. 

82 NPS, HAFE Package 116, Historic Structures Report, History Section, p. 28. 

83 Sanborn and Perris Insurance Map, 1894. 



84 Virginia Free Press, November 1, 1893, p. 3, col. 2; also NPS, HAFE Package 116, Historic Structures Report, History 
Section, pp. 34-35. 

20 



James C. McGraw concentrated his efforts on the beer and beverage bottling 
operation. By March 1895, he announced plans to build a large brewery on Block 
C, alongside the Shenandoah River and across from the market house block. 85 
McGraw continued to operate the hardware business out of Building 33, and 
rented a portion of Building 34/35 to I.V. Pentz for use as a general store. 86 

The brewery enterprise apparently stretched the financial limits of James C. 
McGraw, for on October 1, 1897, he and his surviving sister, Catherine A., 
assigned all of their property to the family attorney, James M. Mason, Jr. The 
trust deed describes the McGraw holdings: 

Said lot is improved by two large stone and brick buildings, the one of which is 
used by said James C. and Katie A. McGraw as their residence [Building 33] as 
well as the store rooms of said J.C. McGraw, the other of which contains two large 
store rooms on the lower floor [Building 34/35], each building being three and a half 

87 

stories in height, and other buildings. 

A public auction of the McGraw holdings and personal household goods was held 
on December 23, 1897, to satisfy the debts to their creditors. The contents of their 
hardware business were sold on February 10, 1898 (see Appendix A). 88 

James and Katie did not stay in town to watch the sale of their home and 
possessions, having left Harpers Ferry before the news of the assignment of their 
property and possessions was made public. They hoped by doing so "to avoid the 
mortification of witnessing the excitement caused by their unexpected 
assignment." 89 

Their bankruptcy resulted in numerous chancery suits in the Jefferson County 
court. The suits were consolidated and a final decree involving the cases was 
entered on February 24, 1899. 90 The decree confirmed the earlier 1898 sale by 
the trustees of that portion of Lot 3 on which buildings 33, 33A, and 32, were 
situated. J. Perry Haddox, Joseph H. Savage and his brother, Ralph, all of 
Winchester, Virginia, purchased the property for $4,000 and were further granted: 



85 Spirit of Jefferson, March 12, 1895, p. 2, col. 4. 

86 Ibid., November 10, 1896, p. 3, col. 2. 

87 Deed Book 83, pp. 493-503, JCC; quoted in NPS, HAFE Package 116, Historic Structures Report, History Section, p. 37. 

88 Spirit of Jefferson, February 8, 1898, p. 2, col. 3. 

89 Ibid., October 5, 1897, p. 2, col. 1. 

90 NPS, HAFE Package 116, Historic Structures Report, History Section, pp. 38-39. 



21 



...the furnace and all appliances belonging thereto, including the smoke-stack, now 
in the cellar of the said McGraw Post Office Building attached to said building in 
the rear thereof, the said parties to remove the same within the next 30 days with 
as little damage to said Post Office Building as possible. 

...all the right, title and interest of J.C. and Katie A. McGraw in and to that portion 
of the alley in rear of and abutting on said above granted lot; and in the portion of 
the Winchester and Potomac Railroad abutting on and in rear of said portion of the 
said alley, including the coal bins under said railroad track on, or supposed to be 
on, the lot herein conveyed... right to remove or cut away the portion of the shedding 
outbuilding lying west to the alley in rear of the above conveyed property so far as 
said building or shedding lies on the lot above granted. ..provided said shedding or 
frame outbuilding is removed with as little damage as ordinary care and diligence 

91 

may cause. 

Haddox and the Savage brothers also purchased the brewery property for their 
Belvidere Brewing Company and used these buildings in conjunction with that 
business. 92 

The trustees continued to rent out space in the various buildings and outbuildings 
while the legal issues were being resolved. In October 1897, the post office moved 
from the McGraw building, probably Building 34/35, to the Ames Building, 
opposite the Hotel Conner. 93 Seven months later, the rear wing of the McGraw 
residence (Building 33A) was leased to August and Laura Krueger, and Henry and 
Eva Schafer. 94 Within Building 34/35, the Pentz store continued operation under 
the management of Ira C. Allstadt. Allstadt, his mother, and his siblings probably 
lived on the upper floors or in the rear wing of the building. 95 Allstadt remained 
in business there until at least December 1902, when he announced plans to 
relocate. 96 The rest of the family may have continued to live in Building 34/35, 
however, since a 1905 wedding notice states that his sister, Cassie, was married to 
E.M. Elder at the home of the bride's mother on Shenandoah Street. 97 



91 Ibid.; Deed Book 86, pp. 260-266, JCC. 

92 NPS, HAFE Package 116, Historic Structures Report, History Section, p. 38. The 1902 Sanborn map notes that these 
structures were used for beer bottling and cold storage. 

93 Spirit of Jefferson, October 12, 1897, p. 2, col. 1. 

94 Deed Book 84, pp. 364 (Krueger) and 441 (Schafer), JCC. 

95 U.S. Bureau of the Census, Twelfth Census of the United States (1900), Jefferson County, West Virginia, p. 79A. 

96 Spirit of Jefferson, December 23, 1902, p. 2, col. 2. 

97 Ibid., July 4, 1905, p. 2, col. 2. 



22 



The Doran Years (1899-1953) 

William Doran purchased the McGraw post office building (Building 34/35 portion 
of Lot 3, Block B), for $4,775 in early 1899, 98 and probably moved into the 
building with his sister Mary Ellen (known as Ella), and their widow mother, 
Sarah." Another possible resident of either Building 34/35 or 33 is the editor of 
the Harpers Ferry Sentinel, who moved down from the Camp Hill area. 100 

Evidence does not indicate exactly when the Dorans opened their store. In 1902, a 
general store (presumably the Pentz operation) was still located in Building 35. A 
variety store had replaced the post office in Building 34 and may have been 
operated by the Doran family, or they may have rented that location to another 
merchant. If the latter were true, the Doran business may have been located in 
the old McGraw hardware building (Building 33), which housed another general 
store in 1902. 101 

Because of financial difficulties, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Savage and Mr. and Mrs. 
J. P. Haddox, the owners of buildings 33, 33A and 32, sold their holdings and 
interests in Lot 3, Block B, to Mary Ellen Doran in 1907 and closed their beverage 
and bottling business. 102 

A pool hall on the lower floor and a restaurant on the upper floor replaced the 
general store in Building 33 between 1902 and 1907. The Doran business 
operated out of the entire bottom floor of Building 34/35. 103 A furniture store 
replaced the pool hall and restaurant in Building 33 sometime between 1907 and 
1912. 104 



98 Ibid., January 24, 1899, p. 3, col. 1; Deed of Bargain and Sale, January 12, 1901; Deed Book 90, p. 188, JCC. 

99 Sarah, William, and Mary Ellen Doran are listed directly above the Allstadt family in the 1900 Census. U.S. Bureau of 
the Census, Twelfth Census of the United States (1900), p. 79A. 

100 Spirit of Jefferson, October 16, 1900, p. 2, col. 3. The notice in the newspaper remarks only that he has moved to 
"McGraw's house in Harpers Ferry." "McGraw's house" could refer to any of a number of properties owned by the McGraws 
including buildings 34/35, building 33, or a building located on Wager Lot 26. The McGraw in question may be John McGraw, 
unrelated to the McGraws of buildings 32 through 35 altogether. 

101 Sanborn and Perris Insurance Map, 1902. 

102 NpS) HAjrg Package 116, Historic Structures Report, History Section, p. 39. 

103 Sanborn and Perris Insurance Map, 1907. A photograph taken about 1910 showing William Doran posing in front of the 
store display windows confirms this use. HF-417, "Mr. Doran & his store, ca. 1910," Historical Photograph Collection, HFNHP. 

104 Sanborn and Perris Insurance Map, 1912. The Spirit of Jefferson reported on September 19, 1911, p. 3, col. 4, that Sarah 
and William Doran had built a large elevator in the rear of the McGraw property, which they had converted into apartments. 
The paper further noted that the Dorans' furniture business was housed on the lower floor. 

23 



The Farmers Advocate reported in 1919 that W. & S.L. Doran sold their entire 
stock and fixtures to the Pennsylvania Underselling Company. 105 However, a 
year later the same newspaper commented that William and his sister had re- 
stocked their store after the sale and reversed their departments "so that the finer 
goods are now sold in the lower room of the McGraw property." 106 

William Doran died in November 1925. 107 Probably because William died 
intestate, his sister announced a going-out-of-business sale in February 1926. The 
stock was sold at one-third its value to the Viener Brothers, and Goodman Sales 
System of Baltimore disposed of the stock. 108 That same year, a bakery began 
operating out of Building 34/35. The bakery had a pastry and cake department, 
marketing a brand of items under the "Martha Washington" label. 109 Later that 
year, a dentist, Dr. Charles Hutchinson, opened an office in the Doran building, 
although it is not clear whether his office was located in Building 34/35, 33, or 
45. no Mary Ellen Doran, together with her niece Mary Cecilia Doran, resumed 
the dry goods business by late 1927. m 

The bakery operation proved unsuccessful, and on February 9, 1928, the local 
newspaper reported that Eugene Bready, the sole owner of the Jefferson Baking 
Company, had signed a deed of trust turning over the business to his attorney, 
F.A. Brown. Only two months later Commissioner Briscoe asked to receive proof 
of the debts against Bready and the Jefferson Baking Company. Public sale of the 
business and equipment was held the following month in front of Building 
34/35. 112 

Charles T. Smith purchased the bakery on June 27, 1928. The new owner held a 
contest to select a trade name for the baked goods. The winning entry was 
submitted by Mrs. M. Naill of Harpers Ferry. Her suggested trade name was 
"Marvel," and the new loaf of bread was to be called, "Smith's Honest Loaf." 113 



105 Farmers Advocate, July 26, 1919, p. 2, col. 4. 

106 Ibid., June 12, 1920, p. 1, col 5. 

107 Farmers Advocate , December 5, 1925, p. 1, col. 2. 
109 Spirit of Jefferson, February 10, 1926, p. 3, col. 3. 

109 Ibid., Historical and Industrial Edition (supplement), July 21, 1926. 

110 Ibid . December 8, 1926, p. 3, col. 2. 

111 Farmers Advocate, October 29, 1927, p. 1, cols. 1 and 2. 

112 Spirit of Jefferson, February 9, 1928, p. 3, col. 5; April 12, 1928, p. 7, col. 4; and May 31, 1928, p. 6, col. 3. 



113 Ibid., July 19, 1928, p. 1, col. 1. 

24 



The business must have prospered for in 1929, Smith moved the bakery from 
Building 34/35 into the former Presbyterian Church located on Shenandoah 
Street. 114 

Little other evidence exists for occupants or uses of Building 34/35 from the late 
1920s until 1952, when the State of West Virginia purchased Lot 3, Block B. In a 
personal interview with Mrs. Mary Cavalier Dalgarn and her brother, Frank 
Cavalier, both of Bolivar, West Virginia, Mr. Cavalier remarked that he had made 
milk deliveries in the 1930s to Mrs. Bell, who lived upstairs over the Doran stores. 
He also remembered that Mr. Baumgardner boarded in Building 34/35 when he 
owned the bakery in the Presbyterian Church building ( 1934-39?). 115 Mr. 
Cavalier also remembered that Josephine and John DeLauder lived in Building 
34/35, probably early in their marriage. Josephine DeLauder was the daughter of 
William Doran and the niece of Mary Ellen Doran. 

In 1947, the Doran property was split between the heirs, with William Doran, the 
son of William and Mary Elizabeth Doran, receiving the portion of the property 
containing buildings 30, 31, 34, 34A, and 35; and his sister, Mary Cecilia Doran 
receiving the rest of the property. 116 In 1952, William Doran and his mother 
Mary Elizabeth (who had retained a dower interest in the property) conveyed 
Building 34/35 to the state of West Virginia. 117 Within the next year the State 
of West Virginia turned over these properties to the National Park Service, and 
they were incorporated into Harpers Ferry National Monument. 

In 1943, the Sunday Sun, a Baltimore newspaper, painted a vivid picture of 
Harpers Ferry's decaying economy: 

Along Shenandoah Street, from the Railroad to Herr's Island once lined with 
substantial stores, hotels and homes, but six houses are occupied, two of these 
being stores. The hotels are gone, the brick and stone business houses are empty 
and desolate, the dwellings are in ruins. 



114 Ibid., October 10, 1929, p. 8, col. 1. 

115 Personal interview conducted with Mary Cavalier Dalgarn and Frank Cavalier, August 8, 1990, by Patricia Craig. It 
is not presently known when the Baumgardner bakery closed, although it may have ceased operation after being damaged in 
the 1936 floods. On the other hand, Jefferson County property records note that Baumgardner was delinquent on his taxes for 
the years 1939-1945 (Deed Book 189, p. 56, JCC), so the bakery may not have closed until 1939. 

116 Deed Book 170, p. 133 (William Doran) and p. 135 (Mary-Cecilia Doran), JCC. 

117 Deed Book 190, p. 315, and Deed Book 191, p. 41, JCC. 

118 R.E.L. Russell, "Where Waters Won," an illustrated magazine supplement in The Sunday Sun, July 11, 1943. 

25 



The rapidly changing history of buildings 32, 33, and 34/35 during the twentieth 
century illustrates the fact that, despite abundant power and excellent 
transportation systems, Harpers Ferry never recovered the strong industrial 
economy it enjoyed during the mid-nineteenth century. 



26 



Chronology of Building Use: Building 34/35 



1812-1818 



Two-story brick structure is built by Joseph S. Annin, son of 
Paymaster Samuel Annin. Used as dwelling and apothecary by 
Joseph Annin and, beginning in 1815, by his retired father 
Samuel. 



1818-1827 

1818-1830 
1821 

1827 

1830-1850 
1837 



Front room on the first floor of Building 34 (room 103) added to 
original structure. 

Armory quarters for Master Armorer Armstead Beckham. 

Government settles claims of Samuel Annin on dwelling and lot 
with Joseph S. Annin, in the amount of $2500. Federal 
government regains full control of property. 

One story brick addition with slate roof constructed as kitchen 
wing. Dimensions: 20 feet by 22 feet. 

Armory quarters for Master Armorer Benjamin Moor. 

Building 34/35 enlarged to a 2 1/2-story building with six 
dormer windows. 



1850-1854 
1854-1858 



11/1858- 
07/1859 



Armory quarters for Master Armorer James H. Burton. 

Armory quarters for Master Armorer Samuel Byington 
(through October, 1858). 

Armory quarters for Paymaster's Clerk John E. Daingerfield. 



07/1859- 
11/1859 



Probably vacant. 



11/1859- 
04/1860 



Recruiting Office and possibly quarters for Captain Burton. 



04/1860- 
01/1861 



Probably vacant. 



27 



Chronology of Building Use: Building 34/35, continued 

1861-1865 Probably used intermittently as officers' quarters for both 

Union and Confederate troops. 

1864 Mrs. Cornelia Stipes operates a boarding house in an 

undetermined portion of the building. 

1869 Federal government sells property to Margaret T., Catherine 

A., and James C. McGraw, minor children of James McGraw, 
for $5100. 

late 1860s Occupied by Annie E. Kirby, a milliner. 

to spring 

1870 

1870-1883 Residence and store of James McGraw and children. 

1878 Abatement claim submitted by McGraw family to reduce 

purchase price of property. 

1880 Title is transferred from the federal government to Margaret 

T., Catherine A., and James C. McGraw on January 5, 1880. A 
hat and bonnet-maker, Frances McDonnell, and her sister, 
Annie, may have rented rooms in the building. 

1882 McGraw children convey the property to their father on 

December 4, 1882. 

1883 McGraw family moves residence and business to adjacent 
Building 33. 

1887 Post office moves from Building 36 into Building 34/35, 

probably to the first floor of Building 35. John Koonce, notary, 
rental agent and rent collector, occupies an office over the post 
office in Building 35. 

1888 M. Cohen & Company, clothiers, begin business in Building 

34/35 around April 15, 1888. 

1891 McGraw adds a third story to Building 34/35, resulting in a 

large store room and 30 large rooms for hotel or boarding use. 
The post office moves into a "room west of it newly fitted for 
that purpose," probably Building 34. 

28 



Chronology of Building Use: Building 34/35, continued 

1896 I.V. Pentz opens a general store in Building 34/35. 

1897 Property is assigned to James M. Mason, Jr., the McGraw 

family attorney. 

1899 William Doran purchases property for $4775. Doran family 

operates general store, with rooms or apartments rented to 
tenants, on the upper floor and in the rear. 

1902 Variety store located in Building 34. 

1919 The stock and fixtures of Wm. & S.L. Doran are sold to the 

Pennsylvania Underselling Company. However, several 
months afterward, the Dorans restock their shop. 

1926 Mary Ellen Doran announces the end of her business. The 

stock, purchased at one third its value by Viener Bros., is 
disposed of by The Goodman Sales System of Baltimore. The 
Jefferson Baking Company begins operations in the entire 
brick Doran Building (34/35). 

1927 Mary Ellen Doran, together with her niece Mary Cecilia Doran, 

resume the dry goods business. 

1928 Jefferson Baking Company is sold to Charles T. Smith on 

June 27, 1928. Smith takes possession of the building on 
July 1, 1928. 

1929 Marvel Bakery moves from the Doran Building to the Old 

Presbyterian Church. 

1947 Doran property split between William and Mary Cecilia Doran. 

William received the portion of the property containing 
buildings 30, 31, 34, 34A, and 35; and Mary Cecilia received 
the rest of the property. 

1952 William Doran and Mary Elizabeth Doran (who retained a 

dower right) sell property to the State of West Virginia. 



29 



PARTI 
THE PROVOST MARSHAL'S OFFICE 



ANALYSIS OF HISTORIC OCCUPANCY 

General Duties and Organization 

As the enforcer of military law, the Civil War provost marshal's responsibilities 
extended to both military and civilian life. The duties of his office included 
administering the oath of allegiance to civilians and deserters from the opposing 
army, regulating civil affairs, issuing passes for travel, supervising the provost 
guard and prisons, capturing deserters of their own army, seizing contraband and 
controlling the mail, supervising stragglers, regulating prices and preventing 
illegal liquor sales to soldiers, as well as completing the voluminous paperwork 
involved in all the above. Military scholar Kenneth Radley noted that "a provost 
system largely based on British precedent existed since the [American] Revolution, 
but it had been restricted to purely military functions," whereas during the Civil 
War its powers were extended to include authority over civilians. 119 The duties 
of Union and Confederate provost marshals were similar except for variations 
necessitated by the Confederate ownership of slaves, such as impressment of 
blacks. 120 

The Provost Marshal Department became a separate function under the War 
Office as a result of the Enrollment Act of March 3, 1863. Col. James Fry was 
given the title of provost marshal general. Under this act the federal government 
took control of recruiting away from the states, 121 which explains why the 
majority of official orders and regulations sent to provost marshals was concerned 
with issues of recruiting. 122 The recruiting function was much more important 
for provost marshals in states such as New York and Connecticut. In military 
zones and border states, the provost marshal's duties concentrated on matters of 
policing and security. 



119 Kenneth Radley, Rebel Watchdog: The Confederate States Army Provost Guard, (Baton Rouge and London: Louisiana 
State University Press, 1989), p. 1. 

,2n Ibid., pp. 51-52. 

121 Francis A. Lord, They Fought for the Union, (Harrisburg, PA: The Stackpole Company, 1960), p. 125. 

122 Such as Regulations for the Government of the Bureau of the Provost Marshal General of the United States. Washington: 
Government Printing Office, 1863) and Index to Circulars, Provost Marshal General's Office, (no publication information, 1863). 



:\o 



In fact, the regulations initiated from the provost marshal general's office in 1863 
seemed to have little effect on those provost marshals and staff detailed for duty 
in military zones and enemy territory, where circumstances and prior precedent 
shaped action. For example, the regulations allowed the provost marshal to 
employ two clerks, whose duties would include acting as recorder for the board of 
enrollment. In military areas, the size of provost marshal office staffs varied, 
since they were detailed from military units as needed. 123 

The proper rank for a provost marshal was captain. 124 These officers were 
expected to report to state acting assistant provost marshals general under the 
provost marshal general of the United States, although provost marshals in 
military areas were responsible to their department commanders. 125 The actual 
organization was not as clear as the manual defined, as hinted in the statement 
by Civil War General Curtis that the "creation of the so-called provost-marshal 
invented a spurious military officer.... Everybody appoints provost-marshals and 
these officers seem to exercise plenary powers." General Schofield argued that the 
officers were "entirely independent of all commanders except the commander of 
the department, and hence of necessity pretty much independent of them." 126 
Many other officers had authority to issue passes as well, making forgeries easier 
and causing debates over jurisdiction. 127 

Despite concerns over the provost marshal's authority or purpose, the officer, his 
staff and guard were of vital importance in areas under martial law, such as 
Harpers Ferry, West Virginia. The provost marshal's office, which could be a tent 
in the field or a courthouse in the center of town, was always distinguished by the 
throngs of soldiers and civilians waiting their turn outside its doors. The 
omnipresent and intrusive nature of their authority in areas under military law is 
evidenced by the comments of contemporary observers, which will be referenced 
later in this report. 



123 Ibid., p. 2.; also Lord, They Fought for the Union, p. 125. 

124 Regulations... of the Provost Marshal General (1863), p. 2. 

126 Ibid., p. 3. According to Dennis Frye, telephone interview September 19, 1990, provost marshals of military areas 
actually reported to the commander of their military districts. 

126 Holland Thompson, "The Provost Marshal and the Citizen," in The Photographic History of the Civil War by Francis 
Trevelyan Miller, ed., (New York: Thomas Yoseloff, 1957), vols. 7 and 8, p. 190. 

127 Alexander Hunter, Johnny Reb and Billy Yank, (New York and Washington: The Neale Publishing Co., 1905), p. 599; 
John Beauchamp Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, Earl Schenck Miers, ed. (New York: Sagamore Press, Inc., 1958), p. 69. 



31 



The Provost Marshal in Harpers Ferry 

Harpers Ferry changed hands several times during the Civil War, but the Union 
army occupied the town for the majority of the period. The Confederates probably 
implemented a provost system during the longest period of Confederate occupation 
from April 18 to June 15, 1861. Joseph Barry, a resident of Harpers Ferry during 
the war, mentions that during this period of occupation guards were posted along 
the streets and many citizens were "confined in filthy guard houses" by the 
Confederates, suggesting that military law was in effect. 128 Little is known 
about the military control of Harpers Ferry during the intermittent Union 
occupation during 1861 and 1862; the volatility of the situation during that time 
suggests that any provost system in place was not on the intricate and organized 
level of the 1863-65 period. 129 

In Spring 1863, the 34th Massachusetts was the first Union regiment to occupy 
Harpers Ferry after the Confederate evacuation of that year. 130 With the arrival 
of the 34th, 131 a provost marshal's operation was set up with office staff and 
provost guards, which remained in place for the remainder of the war, except for a 
few brief occasions when Confederate troops forced federal evacuation. The 
numbers of staff which worked in the office ranged from two (a provost marshal 
and clerk), to six (four clerks, an assistant provost marshal, and a provost 
marshal), to at least eight, including six clerks. 132 The staff changed quite often, 
as both officers and clerks were ordered back to their regiments at intervals, 
replaced by soldiers from other regiments. 

A large number of the Harpers Ferry provost marshal staff during the war were 
detailed from the 34th Massachusetts regiment, including clerk Charles Moulton, 
who arrived with his regiment and was detailed as provost marshal clerk on 
October 8. Two of the provost marshals Moulton reported to during his tenure, 
Captain Potter and Captain Pratt, were from the 34th, adding to the camaraderie 
of the office (Pratt and Potter both achieved the rank of major before the end of 
the war). Because of Moulton's outstanding writing skills and efficiency, he was 



' Barry, The Strange Story of Harpers Ferry, pp. 100-02. The dates of confederate occupation have been taken from 
National Park Service The Fortifications at Harpers Ferry, Virginia in 1861 and Jackson's Attack, May 1862, prepared by 
Charles W. Snell (HFNHP, February 9, 1960), p. 5. 

9 For an eye-witness description of life in Harpers Ferry in the early years of the war, see Barry, The Strange Story of 
Harper's Ferry, pp. 96-124. 

130 Charles Moulton, dispatch to Berkshire Eagle, August 20, 1863, typescripts of original letters, HFNHP. 

131 Lee C. and Karen D. Drickamer, eds., Fort Lyon to Harper's Ferry: On the Border of North and South with "Rambling 
Jour," (Shippensburg, PA: White Mane Publishing Co, Inc., 1987), p. 10. 

132 This information was inferred from various references in Charles Moulton's unedited letters and dispatches, HFNHP 

32 



saved from being ordered back to his regiment many times by provost marshals 
who found him indispensable. In August 1864, for a period of about two weeks, 
Moulton was transferred to the quartermaster's office to clerk there. 133 

Thus, Moulton was able to comment on the office operations from 1863 to 1865 
(after Lee's surrender) through his position as provost marshal's clerk. The 
Harpers Ferry office performed all the responsibilities typical of provost marshal 
offices in areas under martial law: administering the oath of allegiance, 
regulating civil affairs, issuing passes for travel in and out of Harpers Ferry, 
supervising the provost guard, reading mail and opening packages looking for 
contraband, even regulating prices and controlling the illegal liquor sales to 
soldiers. In the five hours the pass room was open each day, it was not 
uncommon for provost marshal staff to issue several hundred passes. 134 Staff 
were on duty all night to receive prisoners or address any other concerns that 
might arise. 135 The clerks were responsible for completing reports of all daily 
transactions and lists of prisoners, as well as compiling them into weekly and 
monthly reports. The provost marshal was even responsible for supervising 
executions. The provost marshal staff, like others in the army who worked in the 
Harpers Ferry business district, interacted with the civilians and patronized the 
local restaurant proprietors. While relations were at times strained, assignment 
to the provost office apparently was considered prestigious by the local population; 
the staff were "the favored recipients of splendid bouquets every day from the 
young ladies of Bolivar." 136 

Beginning in December 1863, a provost marshal general also was stationed at 
Harpers Ferry, heading the Department of West Virginia. 137 According to 
Moulton, his office was "located with Gen. Sullivan's headquarters" and he had 
command "over all the officers in the Department of West Virginia, including this 
Division." 138 The special orders naming a Captain Inwood as Provost Marshal of 
Harpers Ferry on April 7, 1865, illustrates the division of power between the 
provost marshal and commander of the Middle Military District, General 
Stevenson, whose headquarters also was located in Harpers Ferry (in park 
Building 36): 



133 Charles Moulton to Fannie Moulton, July 29, 1864, and August 14, 1864, typescripts of original letters, HFNHP. 

134 Ibid., October 18, 1863, and November 1, 1863, typescripts of original letters, HFNHP. 

135 Charles Moulton to Frank Moulton, December 9, 1863, December 27, 1863, and February 5, 1864, typescripts of original 
letters, HFNHP. 

136 Charles Moulton to Fannie Moulton, June 7, 1864, typescripts of original letters, HFNHP. 

137 Charles Moulton to Frank Moulton, December 9, 1863, typescripts of original letters, HFNHP. 



138 Ibid. 

33 



Capt. Inwood will have charge of all matters relating to the Provost Marshal's Dept. 
except such as specially relate to the command of General Stevenson. All 
applications for passes through the lines, or to the front, all invoices and permits 
for sutlers goods for troops other than those under Gen. Stevenson's command, and 
generally all business concerning troops or persons beyond Gen. Stevenson's lines 
must be presented at Capt. Inwood's office. 

Nothing in this order shall be construed to interfere with the control of Gen. 
Stevenson in his own command or his power to grant passes to citizens or soldiers 
within his own lines, or to persons in the military service or duty. 

Gen. Stevenson will furnish a company of Infantry as Provost Guard to report to 

139 

Captain Inwood. 

The duties of the provost marshal's office magnified as Harpers Ferry became the 
base of operations for General Sheridan's Valley campaign in August 1864. The 
military support services already in Harpers Ferry, such as storehouses of 
supplies, increased. The Harpers Ferry provost office now supervised all other 
provost marshals in the military district of Harpers Ferry ("some half-a-dozen 
offices") of which Harpers Ferry was the headquarters. Approximately 100 
prisoners were sent to Harpers Ferry each day and then forwarded to northern 
prisons. This necessitated larger staff, longer working hours, and relocating the 
guard house to a larger building to detain these prisoners, as well as an increase 
in the amount of paperwork coming in and going out. 140 In October, the base of 
supplies for Sheridan's army was moved to Martinsburg, causing some relief in 
Moulton's workload but also "a less lively appearance" for Harpers Ferry. 141 By 
May 1865, passes were no longer required for citizens, and on the twelfth of that 
month Moulton left to rejoin his regiment, having been finally ordered back. 142 

For the majority of Union occupation (mid-1863 to mid-1865), the provost 
marshal's office was located in a brick building on the east side of High Street 
with the ordnance and quartermaster offices in the stone buildings immediately to 
its north. The location of the provost marshal's office in the vicinity of other 
military or government offices was customary procedure. 143 In his July 27, 1865, 
inspection report of government property at Harpers Ferry, Brig. Gen. Edward D. 
Ramsay noted that the building occupied as the provost marshal's office was "a 



139 NARA, RG 393, part 4, vol. 4/7,8, entry 528, p. 224, special order #87, signed by Major General Hancock, A.A.G., 
Headquarters, Middle Military Division. 

140 Charles Moulton to Frank Moulton, August 28, 1864, typescripts of original letters, HFNHP. 
U1 Charles Moulton to Fannie Moulton, October 7, 1864, typescripts of original letters, HFNHP. 

142 Ibid., May 7, 1865, and May 12, 1865, typescripts of original letters, HFNHP. 

143 Ibid., March 30, 1864, typescripts of original letters, HFNHP (Martinsburg) and Joseph Ward. "The Civil War Letters 
of Joseph P. Ward, 34th Massachusetts Regiment, Co. E," bound transcripts, HFNHP. p. 60 (Washington). 

34 



three story brick" building, which he designated as number 16 on his report, "in 
fair condition," located on High Street. 144 Charles Moulton described the 
building as "Number 45 High Street." 145 Located on Wager lot 20, the building 
was owned by the U. S. government and used prior to the war as a dwelling for 
armory workers. Armory worker William Moore may have lived there before the 
Civil War. 146 Figure 5 indicates the probable configuration of this building in 
the 1860s. 

The office was briefly moved to a location on Shenandoah Street by a newly 
assigned provost marshal in late July 1864, and quickly moved back to the High 
Street location two weeks later when that provost marshal was reassigned to 
nearby Sandy Hook. The High Street location was preferred to the dusty but 
more visible location on Shenandoah Street. Charles Moulton commented that the 
temporary location "near the depot, in a corner" allowed the interim provost 
marshal to "'show off as much as possible on the Main Street," but in actuality 
was 

the poorest location that could have been procured, it being in the central part of 
town, where the street is blockaded from morning till night with army wagons, 
rendering the rooms very warm and uncomfortable and a cloud of dust rising 
continually filled the office and its contents with dirt. The tables and desks were 
covered with dust.... So the first thing we done was to place the property and effects 
back again in our old, spacious, cool and airy rooms. 

The office may have been located elsewhere prior to Moulton's duty. Stencil 
markings probably relating to the provost marshal's department exist on a second 
floor wall of a Shenandoah Street building (park building 44); the lettering 
appears to have been intended for marking barrels. The room may have been 
used for storage of goods or quarters for provost marshal personnel. Although 
there appears to have been a Confederate provost marshal's office during that 
army's occupation, the location of the office is unknown. 



144 Brig. Gen. Inspector Edward D. Ramsay, to Brig. Gen. A.B. Dyer, Chief of Ordnance, July 27, 1865, Map Drawer no. 10, 
HFNHP, photocopy from NARA, RG 156. The location was determined by comparing the Ramsay list's description and order 
of buildings to the physical evidence on High Street. The building identified as the former provost marshal's office, 3 High 
Street, is currently privately owned and occupied as the "Silver and Sun" photographic studio. 

145 Charles Moulton to Fannie Moulton, April 17, 1864, typescripts of original letters, HFNHP. He also describes the "Green 
House," a favorite saloon for officers, as "No. 40" High Street. (Charles Moulton to Fannie Moulton, March 30, 1864, transcripts 
of original letters, HFNHP). Since Moulton addressed his correspondence in this manner, it is assumed that these numbers 
were in common use at that period, although this has not been corroborated due to the scarcity of information on the physical 
appearance of wartime Harpers Ferry. 

146 National Park Service, "Historic Building Site Survey Report: Wager Lots No. 17-34, 1782-1869," prepared by Arthur 
L. Sullivan (HFNM, February 18, 1959, revised May 15, 1959), High Street Studies Series, no. 1, pp. 64-65. Sullivan's 
determination that Moore lived in the house is based on his examination of the 1860 census. 

147 Charles Moulton to Fannie Moulton, August 14, 1864, typescripts of original letters, HFNHP. 

35 



Based on the arrangement of other provost marshal operations, the Harpers Ferry 

provost marshal would have located his office on the first (ground-level) floor, the 

most accessible and visible location. 148 The provost marshal's clerks, including i 

Charles Moulton, lived in the High Street building at least part of the time, 149 

probably upstairs; the use of the basement is not known. It may have been used 

for confiscated goods and clothing, since there is evidence for such use of the ' 

basement in a Richmond Confederate provost marshal's office. 150 

In addition to the provost marshal general's office located at headquarters, provost 

marshal operations also included the prisons, or guard houses. Various buildings 

were used as guard houses, including the fire engine house, known as John ■ 

Brown's fort. Nathaniel Hawthorne mentioned that the engine house was "a place 

of confinement for rebel prisoners" when he visited during the Civil War. 151 r 

Armory factory buildings were also used. One Confederate prisoner held there in 

late 1863 to early 1864 provided this description. He was 

i 
immediately taken before the provost marshal and subjected to another 
examination. ...Then [he] was placed in the garrison guard-house, a horrible place, 
worse by far than a jail. ...Originally it had been part of the old Armory building, i 

burnt during the first year of the war. Nothing but the walls had been left 
standing; these had been roofed over.... There were three large rooms connected by 
doorways which had no doors, but instead stood a sentinel with loaded musket to m 

prevent going from one apartment to another.... The room upon the left was for the 
use of the officer of the day; that in the center was for Rebel prisoners, while in the 
one on the right were confined Yankees held in durance for a gamut of crimes, ■ 

running from desertion to murder.... It was hard to become accustomed to those iron 
bracelets. 

Even more space was necessary during Sheridan's campaigns. As Charles 
Moulton noted, 

So great has been the increase in our prisoners that it has become necessary to 

remove the Guard House to a large and more spacious building. It is now located ^ 

in a old factory building, four stories high, the Federal, Rebel and Citizen prisoners 

being placed in separate rooms. The guard occupies the remaining floor... the 

building being higher it required a smaller guard than before as the prisoners have 



MM 



149 



160 



161 



See Illustrations, specifically figures 4-23. 

Charles Moulton to Fannie Moulton, December 20, 1863, typescripts of original letters, HFNHP. 

Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, p. 69. 

Cited in "Notes on John Brown's Fort During the Civil War," n.d., interpretive materials, HFNHP. 






162 Hunter, Johnny Reb and Billy Yank, pp. 480-82. Hunter provides an excellent account of prison life in Harpers Ferry 
from the perspective of a captured Confederate soldier. 

36 -a 



no way of escape, but to leap out the windows.... One of the Federal prisoners did 
jump out a 4th story window...." 

At the height of operations, some Confederate prisoners were kept in Bolivar. 154 
Even the upper floors of the Presbyterian church were used as a guard house. 155 
Also, two rooms were used as a guard house on property owned by J.C. Smith. 156 

In the yard of one of the guard houses, the provost marshal had placed "a little 
contrivance" which consisted of "4 sticks driven into the ground and the criminal 
is spread out and his hands and feet tied to the poles." Moulton implied that this 
"spread eagle" was the fate of citizens who illegally sold liquor to soldiers. 157 

The provost marshal organization affected the physical landscape beyond these 
few structures, however, since they controlled the guards who were stationed 
along the streets and at town borders, and who met every train. 



EVIDENCE OF ORIGINAL FURNISHINGS 

Discussion of Sources 

The evidence for furnishing the Harpers Ferry provost marshal's office has been 
derived largely from the documentary material contained in Charles Moulton's 
letters and supplemented by other information listed below. A complete listing of 
the sources used in this report may be found in the bibliography. 

No comprehensive study of the provost marshal's function in the civil war has 
been written, although aspects have been treated in surveys of the war. Rebel 
Watchdog: The Confederate States Army Provost Guard, focuses on the provost 
guards under the marshal and is useful since the Confederacy modeled its provost 
department after that of the U.S. Army. 



153 Charles Moulton to Frank Moulton, August 28, 1864, typescripts of original letters, HFNHP. The building described may 
have been the cotton factory on Virginius Island. 

154 Ibid., September 23, 1864, typescripts of original letters, HFNHP. 

155 Barry, The Strange Story of Harper's Ferry, p. 147. 

156 Perry Collection, Virginia Historical Society, Richmond. CW-D-246, Box 42, letter to Quartermaster General's office in 
Washington, D.C., dated Nov. 29, 1865. Notes of Kira Ramakrishna, research historian, HFNHP. The location of J.C. Smith's 
property is unknown. 

157 Charles Moulton to Frank Moulton, October 20, 1864, typescripts of original letters, HFNHP. 

37 



Official correspondence and orders located in the Official Records of the Union and 
Confederate Armies, and in bound compilations of circulars provide information on 
duties and staff. The Revised U.S. Army Regulations of 1861... (1863) offers 
guidance on what furnishings and stationery all military offices were allowed. 

The only source indicating specific furnishings information for the Harpers Ferry 
provost marshal's office is the material written by Charles Moulton, provost 
marshal's clerk at Harpers Ferry, compiled into a volume entitled, Fort Lyon to 
Harpers Ferry: On the Border of North and South with "Rambling Jour." 
Transcriptions of the complete, unedited letters to his family are located in 
Harpers Ferry NHP; these have been used in preference to the edited compilations 
except for commentary by editors of the volume. Moulton's letters appear to be 
the best known source of the daily operations of any provost marshal's office 
during the Civil War. Since Moulton worked as a journalist before the war, his 
writings are frequent (almost ninety letters have been found, many totaling four 
pages each) and reflect an observant personality. Also, Moulton's skills as a clerk 
kept him from being returned to his regiment or reassigned elsewhere, so he was 
able to write from the office over a two-year period. 

The 1865 Ramsay inspection and the 1959 Sullivan report, as well as physical 
evidence from the extant building, provided information on the contemporary 
description and prior use of the High Street building in which the provost 
marshal's office was located. 

Moulton mentions that one of his forms was printed at Harpers Ferry at the "new 
printing office." Descendants of a local family have donated a Civil War period 
printing press that was used locally after the war and may have been located in 
the printing office to which Moulton refers. 

Prisoner reports and other material from the period in 1863 when Captain Brady 
was provost marshal at Harpers Ferry and correspondence from Captain Flagg of 
the quartermaster's office are located on microfilm at Harpers Ferry NHP. 
General information on Harpers Ferry during the Civil War is summarized in a 
series of reports by park historian Charles Snell listed in the bibliography. 
Taylor's The James E. Taylor Sketchbook includes information regarding the 
military presence at Harpers Ferry. The letters of Joseph Ward and Horace Ball, 
two Civil War soldiers from the 34th Massachusetts regiment, discuss the life of a 
soldier stationed in Harpers Ferry. The Civil War reminiscences of Harpers Ferry 
residents Joseph Barry and Anne Marmion offer supplementary material on the 
town during this period. Orders contained in Record Group 393 in the National 
Archives provide very general information about Harpers Ferry military 
personnel. 



38 



No pictures of the Harpers Ferry provost marshal's office exist. Civil War period 
images of Captain Pratt, provost marshal at Harpers Ferry, are extant. 

Some general comparative evidence of other provost marshals' offices aided in the 
preparation of this report. Diaries and letters of civilians and soldiers mention 
encounters with provost marshal staff and visits to their offices. These sources 
tend to be more descriptive than official records, although one must sort through a 
great quantity of information for brief mentions of physical evidence for the office. 
These sources are listed in the bibliography. 

Comparative interior sketches of provost marshals' offices from both Leslie's and 
Harper's histories of the war, and exterior photos from several sources are useful 
since they assist in determining room arrangement, types of furnishings, and 
exterior treatment. These offices were not all furnished the same, and that 
diversity is evident in the source material. Since certain regulations pertained to 
all military offices, images of other types of military offices are included in this 
report, as well. 



Evidence Specific to Harpers Ferry 

From the book, Fort Lyon to Harper's Ferry: On the Border of North and 
South with "Rambling Jour", The Civil War Letters and Newspaper 
Dispatches of Charles H. Moulton. (Evidence is arranged by type of 
furnishings.) 

— Passes I Pass Book 

My duty is to write passes and issue them to the persons who may call for them, 
entering every name in a book with the place of their residence, number of the 
pass, when going, for how many days, before whom they took the oath, etc. 
(October 18, 1863) 

Some days the office is crowded and we give out from 100 to 500 passes. 
(October 18, 1863) 

— Desks I Furniture 

The tables and desks were covered with dust.... (August 14, 1864) 

I am seated at the desk. ...One of the clerks sits half reclining at one of the desks. 
(December 27, 1863) 

Near the fireplace lies the Lieut, of the Guard at the duty.. .on a bench sleeping. 
(December 27, 1863) 



39 



I took down the list book to record [names of prisoners]. (February 5, 1864) 

I sleep in the office now.... (February 5, 1864) 

...the young soldier stood on the opposite side of the railing, some three or four feet 
from her while she sat inside and remaining seated.... (April 17, 1864) 

on my writing desk (June 21, 1864) 

The official documents which we had left in their proper places in the 'pigeon holes' 
of the desks, with every month's papers neatly wrapped together.... 
(August 14, 1864) 

I have got us a new desk put up today. (January 12, 1865) 

Confiscated Goods I Contraband in Letters 

Every trunk and all the private baggage that comes on the cars is searched and if 
anything contraband is found in them, the whole lot is confiscated. This gives me 
the chance to read all the letters and correspondence that may be in the possession 
of a person. (October 18, 1863) 

whenever we have had any articles of food or clothing on hand in the office, I have 
given it to her [his landlady]. I have given her at different times, one or two 
patterns for calico dresses, sugar, tea, or any other little things we may be 
possessed with. (June 21, 1864) 

I also gave them [soldiers] second-hand pants and several articles of cast-off 
clothing that we had in the office and would have gladly given them more if we had 
not been extensively thinned out by the recent raid.... (July 29, 1864) 

You ought to see the pile of knives [confiscated jackknives] and other "relics" we 
have on hand-about a barrel full. (October 7, 1864) 

Stationery I Reports I Miscellaneous 

'two or three placards for the office' which Moulton lettered. (November 1, 1863) 

You will notice the heading of this sheet which was done at the new printing office 
in this place. (December 9, 1863) 

'papers being lying [sic] on the table' with Captain Potter's [provost marshal] 
signature. (February 5, 1864) 

Since Johnny left I have taken his place in the Capt.'s Office and have the Morning 
reports to make out and the orders and lists of prisoners to write, etc. 
(February 5, 1864) 



40 



I never was so mad in all my life. Federal Prisoner's name had been entered on the 
Rebel Prisoner or Citizen book, Prisoners of War in the Rebel Deserter book and 
vise versa. (August 14, 1864) 

a Weekly Report is sent from each office [in the district], and at the end of the 
month I shall have to form a consolidated Monthly Report [consolidation of 
prisoners listings].... Our sheets for this purpose are 2x3 feet in size. ..about like the 
paper the Courier is printed on in size and ruled fine, half-spaces. Lately I have 
been obliged to splice these sheets, having some 200 names to enter, their charges, 
etc.... (August 28, 1864) 

Moulton 'posted up in the office' 1864 'Cattle Show bill' from home. (April 17, 1864) 

tell Frank to have the [Berkshire] Courier discontinued until he hears from me. 
(March 25, 1865) 

one of the clerks reading a "volume of 'yallow-kivered litterture'. 
(December 27, 1863) 

We are the favored recipients of splendid bouquets every day from the young ladies 
of Bolivar. (June 7, 1864) 

Comparing quartermaster's office to provost marshal's office: 'we have a carpet on 
the floor. I hardly knew how to behave—it seems like a parlor after coming out of a 
dirty old Prov. Marshal's habitat....' (August 4, 1864) 



— Clothing 



'Fatigue sack coats' clerks wore as opposed to dress coats. 
(December 20, 1863) 

he even hung his overcoat and cap in another room. (March 1, 1864) 

Moulton wears 'dark blue pants and sack coat.' (June 7, 1864) 

All I lost was what I left in the office-two dress coats, a pair of shoes, two pairs of 
socks and one pair of drawers. (July 18, 1864) 



From the book, With Sheridan Up the Shenandoah Valley in 1864: Leaves 
from a Special Artist's Sketchbook and Diary [The James E. Taylor 
Sketchbook] . 

Describing High Street: "composed of habitations of brick, stone and wood, with 
slanting roofs and dormer windows, and railing'd stoops—flush with the sidewalk 
with alternating piazzas and balustrades at the east and north side of the more 
pretentious buildings." (p. 43) 



41 



Taylor mentions dropping a mailpouch off at headquarters on Shenandoah (p. 38) 
and later comments that he was depositing mail in the mailbag at the provost 
marshal's office (pp. 215, 250). However, given his documented confusion of 
provost marshals with commanders, it is not likely that the mailbag was located 
in the provost office. 



Government Regulations 

— The 1861 Army Regulations (revised 1863) 

The furniture for each office will be two common desks or tables, six common 
chairs, one pair common andirons, and shovel and tongs, (p. 162, par. 1088) 

The following books are to be allowed to each company: one descriptive book, one 
clothing book, one order book, one morning report book, each one quire, sixteen 
inches by ten. (p. 24, par. 127. For a list of the quarterly issue of stationery, see 
Appendix B.) 

The regimental and company desk prescribed in army regulations will be 
transported; also for staff officers, the books, papers, and instruments necessary to 
their duties, (p. 164, par. 1098) 

— The Index to Circulars, Provost Marshal General's Office, 1863 

Provost Marshal will, hereafter, make a Weekly Report, upon Blank forms to be 
furnished from this Bureau, of all officers, soldiers, and citizens employed by them; 
and will forward the same to this office, through the Acting Assistant Provost 
Marshal General of their State or Division, (circ. #105, Dec. 2, 1863) 



U.S. War Department Regulations for the Government of the Bureau of 
the Provost Marshal General of the United States (1863). 

That for each of said districts there shall be appointed by the President a provost 
marshal, with the rank, pay, and emoluments of a captain of cavalry, or an officer 
of said rank shall be detailed by the President, who shall be under the direction 
and subject to the orders of the provost marshal general.... 
(#6, p. 2; see forms in Appendix C.) 



Other Provost Marshals 

The Richmond Confederate passport office "was a filthy one; it was inhabited—for 
they slept there-by his [General Winder's] rowdy clerks. And when I stepped to 
the hydrant for a glass of water, the tumbler repulsed me with the smell of 
whiskey. There was no towel for me to wipe my hands with, and in the long 
basement room underneath, were a thousand garments of dead soldiers, taken from 

42 



the hospitals and the battlefields, and exhaling a most disagreeable, if not 
deleterious, odor." (Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, p. 69) 

The [Richmond Confederate] Provost Marshal's office kept a blackboard on which 
he who ran might read the names of the regiments sent to the Peninsula.... and not 
until a stranger who was copying from it fled on being questioned was it done away 
with. (Bill, The Beleaguered City: Richmond, 1861-1865, p. 115. Although this is a 
fairly trustworthy secondary source, the information on the blackboard should be 
corroborated since the author did not quote his source.) 

Marsena Patrick, Provost Marshal General of the Army of the Potomac, and his 
staff brought furniture along when he moved into Richmond to be Union provost 
marshal in 1865. (Patrick, Inside Lincoln's Army: The Diary of Marsena Rudolph 
Patrick, Provost Marshal General, Army of the Potomac, p. 495) 

Of the Charleston Confederate provost marshal operations: "many a luckless wight 
in military or semi-military costume, who had no leave of absence to show, was 
trotted off to the guard house, where he either did have or at some future time will 
have an opportunity of giving an account of himself." (Hagood, Memoirs of the War 
of Secession: From the Original Manuscripts of Johnson Hagood, p. 78) 

The quiet precincts of the city hall were suddenly converted into a veritable camp, 
to the manifest delight of the urchins who thronged the railings of the enclosure 
gazing admiringly upon the taut canvass walls. There was a great rush to the 
passport office. (Hagood, Memoirs of the War of Secession: From the Original 
Manuscripts of Johnson Hagood, p. 78) 

The passport office was now at leisure and finally organized by establishing two 
offices in different departments, one for citizens with separate desks of application 
for males and females (whites) and for negroes bond and free; another for the 
military with a separate desk for invalid soldiers from which all other applicants 
were excluded. (Hagood, Memoirs of the War of Secession: From the Original 
Manuscripts of Johnson Hagood, p. 79) 

A Confederate soldier named Patterson went to a Confederate provost marshal's 
office to "procure the necessary papers" to join his command but was directed to 
Sgt. Crow's office: "As I stood outside waiting my time, I noticed that none came 
back, but as soon as they received their papers they went upstairs. I 'began to smell 
a rat' and as I had no notion of remaining cooped up there until tomorrow 
morning.... I thanked my stars that I was still outside and left." (Patterson, Yankee 
Rebel: The Civil War Journal of Edmund DeWitt Patterson, pp. 80-81) 



43 



FURNISHINGS PLAN (Provost Marshal's office) 

Overview 

Physical evidence of the High Street building and descriptions in the Moulton 
material indicate that the Harpers Ferry provost marshal's office consisted of a 
front and a back room. The furnishings plan takes into consideration the 
configuration and size of the High Street office, although this can only be done in 
a general way in order to accommodate the architecture and interior space of 
Building 34. 158 In the High Street office, all traffic went through the front room, 
which was used primarily as a passport office and staffed by clerks and an 
assistant provost marshal. The provost marshal and the chief clerk occupied the 
rear office. 159 The passport office should have three desks with chairs for the 
staff, as well as a bench to accommodate others waiting. The staff varied between 
two and eight, and the exact number of desks or chairs is not known; therefore, 
the number of desks has been based on the space available in the rooms. The 
Army Regulations provide for "six common chairs" for the whole office. The 
pictorial evidence indicates that the chairs probably would have been some kind of 
Windsor. 160 There was a railing in the front room, placed across the room to 
divide the clerks' desks from the civilians and soldiers waiting for passes. 161 The 
desks held the standard desk equipment, as well as mail which was read and 
confiscated if disloyal sentiments were found. There are several references to 
passes in Moulton; since the front room was the pass room, it would be logical for 
pass blanks to be stored in the front room. 162 Bibles would have been located in 
the front office on desks, readily available for administering the oath of 
allegiance. 163 Fireplace equipment was issued by the government. 164 Moulton 
mentions a bench, probably backless, by the fireplace in the front room, which 
may have been pushed out of the way or moved to the waiting area during the 
day. Locating the bench by the fireplace would hamper the flow in Building 34, 



168 See working drawings of proposed furnishings included in this report. 

169 Moulton, October 18, 1863; February 5, 1864. 

100 The army regulations only allow for "two common desks or tables"(p. 162); given the fact that officers purchased their 
own desks which they brought with them to their various assignments (personal interview with Bill Brown, July 16, 1990), this 
number for the clerks is less than that mentioned by Moulton. The type of desks varied, as shown by the pictorial evidence, 
and by the fact that Moulton mentions "tables and desks." 

161 Moulton, April 17, 1864. For examples of railings used in interiors for similar purposes, see figures 22 and 23. The 
railing in the Harpers Ferry Provost Marshal's office may have been more temporary in nature. 

162 See Appendix B for a list of the quarterly issues of stationery from the Revised U.S. Army Regulations of 1861..., see 
Moulton, October 18, 1863, for evidence of mail. 

163 See figure 7 in the Illustration section of this report. 

164 Revised U.S. Army Regulations of 1861.... (1863) p. 162, para. 1088. 



44 



therefore the bench should be used as a supplemental bench in the waiting 
area. 165 

Each month's papers were placed in pigeonholes, probably in the desks in the back 
room, since that is where the monthly reports were filled out. The monthly 
reports of prisoners were 2 by 3 feet in size and would have been folded to fit in 
the pigeonholes. The weekly reports sent from each provost office in the division 
would also have been stored in the back room, as well as other papers and 
ledgers. 166 The office had at least one bed, most likely a hospital cot, for clerks 
to sleep on when on duty, and probably temporary bedding, such as bedrolls. 
Since Moulton describes four deserters sleeping in the "adjoining room" when he is 
writing from what appears to be the front room, the cot should be placed in the 
back room. 

Other furnishings included hooks or pegs in the wall on which to hang coats and 
hats. 167 Moulton also fabricated placards in his own handwriting, possibly the 
names of the staff for each desk (or at least the officers with their titles) or a sign 
posted with the pass room hours (9-11 a.m. and 1-4 p.m.). 168 The provost 
marshal's office had a large quantity of confiscated goods, clothing, and food on 
hand at any given time. While it is not clear whether these would have been 
stored in the office, or perhaps in the basement, it would not be inaccurate to have 
a sampling in the office. 

The excerpt below from a letter written by Charles Moulton describing the evening 
shift helps to explain the arrangement of the office: 

It is Sabbath evening half past 10 o'clock. ...I am seated at the desk, passing 
industriously the hour of my "turn" at sitting up at night, waiting for the 
train.... inside there is a blazing fire. ...Near the fire-place lies the Lieut, of the 
Guard at the depot, on a bench sleeping... just before going on his tedious night's 
duty. One of the clerks sits half-reclining, at one of the desks, deeply absorbed in 
the pages of a volume of "yallow-kivered litterture." In the neighboring room are 
four persons who have "put up" as guests of the hospitable "P.M. Hotel-de- 
Ville." 169 



165 Moulton, December 27, 1863. 

Ibid., August 14, 1864; August 28, 1864. 
Ibid., November 1, 1863; fig. 8. 
Ibid., November 1, 1863. 
Ibid., December 27, 1863. 

45 



|M, 



11.7 



1CH 



ii;:) 



The office should also include objects that reflect the staffs connection to their 
hometowns, since many of the staff were from Massachusetts and some even came 
from the same regiment. Evidence indicates that Moulton posted a cattle show 
notice from Pittsfield, Massachusetts, on a wall in the office. Since Moulton 
subscribed to The Berkshire Courier, and others in the office read it as well, a copy 
should be placed on one of the desks. 170 Moulton's family addressed his mail to 
the provost marshal's office; therefore, letters from home would probably be 
located on or in the desks. As the above quotation suggests, the office could also 
contain reading material used to pass the long evening hours. Local female 
citizens gave the clerks daily "bouquets" in the spring, probably consisting of fruits 
and vegetables, which should be placed on the desks or tables. 171 

The exterior of the building is integral to the furnishings plan. The building had 
to be immediately identifiable, since everyone traveling in and out of town was 
required to stop there first. Based on photographs and sketches of exteriors of 
other provost marshal offices, the exterior should have a large sign in black 
lettering over the door reading "Provost Marshal" and possibly an American flag 
hanging outside. 172 

All of the furnishings should look well-used, since hundreds of people passed 
through the office in a day and buildings used by the military during the war did 
not survive in very good condition. Brigadier General Ramsay remarked that "the 
costly quarters of the Superintendent of the Armory, of the Paymaster, and other 
conspicuous and valuable buildings belonging to the government, have been 
wantonly abused, and I am sorry to say, as I am credibly informed, mostly by our 
own troops [during the course of the war]." 173 Since this building had been an 
armory worker's dwelling prior to the war, fixtures appropriate to comparable 
domestic living spaces of the period should be installed. 

As the pictorial evidence indicates, interiors of provost marshal's offices varied 
widely. This may be a result of the expediency often necessary in setting up such 
an office and instituting martial law. The building's previous use also affected the 
furnishings since the military used domestic, commercial, and municipal buildings. 
The furnishings could reflect the furniture and fixtures of previous occupants who 
were forced in many instances to flee from the area. The furnishings also 



170 Ibid., April 17, 1864, and March 25, 1865. The cattle show to which Moulton refers was a descendent of the first 
agricultural fair in America. (Telephone interview with Carolyn Banfield, Director, Berkshire County Historical Society, 
September 24, 1990). 

171 Ibid., June 7, 1864. 

172 See figures 10-12 in the Illustration section of this report. 

173 Ramsay to Dyer, July 27, 1865, p. 4, HFNHP. 



46 



reflected the relative permanency of the office; certainly the relative stability of 
the Harpers Ferry provost marshal's office suggests that it would contain more 
objects from the "settling in" process, than would an office at the onset of Union 
occupation (see figure 6, the illustration of the Charleston, South Carolina, provost 
marshal office for an example of the latter). 

Although the evidence indicates that Harpers Ferry had a printing office, a Civil 
War printing press has been included in the furnishings plan for the provost 
marshal's office. An original press with a local provenance has been donated to 
the park. The press was probably used by Union forces during the occupation, 
possibly in a building once located on the second lot east of Bridge Street. 174 
Printed forms and handbills were important to the operation of a provost 
marshal's office. Therefore, furnishings division and park staff felt that the 
printing press should be displayed in the provost marshal's office unless another 
more appropriate location is found for it. 



Interpretive Objectives and Operating Plan 

The provost marshal's office will allow an interpretation of the impact of the Civil 
War on Harpers Ferry, allowing the visitors to understand what life was like here 
for local citizens, military personnel stationed here, and visitors passing through 
town. An important aspect of the interpretation is the interaction of local civilians 
with military personnel from the north. Moulton comments on many differences 
between New England and Virginia/West Virginia, and the attempt to preserve 
their northern culture through objects displayed in the office. The office may also 
stimulate discussions about the people who traveled through Harpers Ferry during 
the war, including prisoners, and their different impressions of the town. 

During the busiest tourist seasons, the exhibit will be staffed and visitors will be 
invited into the front room. The back room will be viewed from the doorway at the 
rear of the building, which will be fitted with a hinged, full-length glass or acrylic 
plastic door in addition to its historic door. By special arrangement with park 
staff, visitors with mobility limitations will be escorted through this doorway and 
through the back room so that they can view the front room through doorway 110. 
When unstaffed, visitors will enter room 102 from Shenandoah Street and view 
the room from behind the historic barrier. An alarm will sound if visitors attempt 
to cross this barrier. The rear room will still be viewed from the rear doorway. 
Interpretive panels located inside the front and rear doors will provide background 
information when the building is unstaffed. 



174 Memorandum from Dennis Frye to Supervisors, et al., April 1, 1993, p. 1. This memo draws its conclusions from a 
document: "Statement of Abandoned Property at Harpers Ferry and Bolivar, Jefferson Co. Va.," February 24, 1864, No. 19698, 
Cotton and Captured Property Records, Entry 370, located in U.S. Dept. of Treasury Records, NARA, RG 56. 

47 



Documentation for provost marshal's and clerks' wear may be gleaned from 
Moulton evidence and comparative pictorial documentation. Costumed females 
are appropriate waiting on a bench, but never behind the desks. The 
interpretation of this exhibit would be enhanced if a sentry were stationed at the 
entrance, since this was a frequent practice at provost marshal's offices. 



48 




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Recommended Furnishings 

Provost Marshal's office, room 103, (front) Building 



34. 



Object and Location 

TABLE with fall-front 
MILITARY DESK (NE 
corner) 

TABLES, 2 (SW corner) 



DESKS, tabletop, 2 (on 
tables in SW corner) 

CHAIRS, Windsor, 3 (one 
behind each desk or table) 



BENCH, Windsor (against 
west wall in NW corner) 

BENCH, common backless 
(against north wall in NW 
corner) 

RAILING (two sections of 
railing separating NW 
corner from rest of room) 

LAMP, lard oil, with paper 
shade (on desk in NE 
corner) 



CANDLESTICKS, 2 (on 
fireplace mantel) 

CANDLES, 5 (two in 
candlesticks, three on 
mantel near candlesticks) 

MATCHBOX, with matches 
(on mantel near 
candlesticks) 

ANDIRONS, SHOVEL, and 
TONGS (near fireplace) 



Documentation 

Moulton letters, 12/27/63, 
6/21/64, 8/14/64, 1/12/65; 
figure 6. 

Moulton letters, 8/14/64; 
figures 6, 8, 17, 18, 19, 21. 

Moulton letters, 6/21/64, 
8/14/64, 1/12/65, figure 6. 

Moulton letters, 12/27/63; 
figures 6, 8, 17, 18, 20, and 
21. 

Moulton letters, 4/17/64; 
figure 17. 

Moulton letters, 12/27/63. 



Moulton letters, 4/17/64; 
figures 22 and 23. 



Moulton letters, 12/27/63 
letter indicates that clerks 
were required to work at 
night and would require 
artificial illumination. 

Moulton letters, 12/27/63. 
Moulton letters, 12/27/63. 

Moulton letters, 12/27/63. 



Army Regulations of 1861 
(1863), p. 162, par. 1088. 



Recommendation 



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Use HAFE 5141, paint red. 



Reproduce. 



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50 



Provost Marshal's office, 

Object and Location 

PENS, INK BOTTLES, 
PAPER SPEARS (assorted 
on desks) 



PAPERS and FORMS, asst. 
(a quantity of papers and 
forms on each desk) 

LETTERS, 12 (on table) 

PLACARD, handwritten (on 
desk in NE corner) 

BOOK, popular fiction, 
with yellow cover (on table 
in SW corner near wall) 

ARTIFICIAL FRUITS and 
VEGETABLES,in redware 
bowl (on fireplace mantel) 

NEWSPAPER, Berkshire 
Courier (on table in SW 
corner near center of room) 

NOTICE of Pittsfield, 
Mass. Cattle Show (on west 
wall between windows) 

PEGS, wooden, 3 (on east 
wall) 

SACKCOATS, 2 (on pegs on 

east wall) 

DRESS COAT (on peg on 

east wall) 

HAT, 1, and CAPS, 2 (two 
on pegs on east wall, one 
on table in SW corner) 

BIBLES, 3 (one on each 
desk or table) 



room 103, continued 

Documentation 

Moulton letters, 10/18/63 et. 
al. indicate that the clerks' 
primary occupation was 
writing; figures 6, 8, 7, 17, 
18, 19, and 21. 

Moulton letters, 10/18/63, 
8/14/64, 12/9/63, 2/5/64, 
8/28/64; figures 6 and 7. 

Moulton letters, 10/18/63. 

Moulton letters, 11/1/63. 

Moulton letters, 12/27/63. 



Moulton letters, 6/7/64. 



Moulton letters, 3/25/65. 



Moulton letters, 4/17/64. 



Moulton letters, 3/1/64; 
figure 7. 

Moulton letters, 12/20/63; 
6/7/64. 

Moulton letters, 7/18/64. 



Moulton letters, 3/1/64; 
figures 7, 18, 19, and 20. 



Moulton letters, 10/18/63; 
figure 6. 



Recommendation 



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Acquire reproduction, 
papers and forms 



Acquire reproductions. 
Acquire reproduction. 

Acquire period piece. 



Acquire artificial fruits and 
vegetables and period bowl. 



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51 



Provost Marshal's office, room 103, continued 



Object and Location 



Documentation 



Recommendation 



WATER COOLER (on 
small table against south 
wall) 

TABLE, small (against 
south wall) 

TUMBLER, glass (on small 
table near water cooler) 

CURTAINS, 5 pr. (one pair 
at each window) 



WINDOW SHADES, 5 (one 
shade at each window) 



MAPS, 2 (one above 
mantel, one on south wall) 



Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's 
Diary, p. 69. 



Jones, p. 69. 
Jones, p. 69 



Since the provost marshal's 
office occupied a former 
home, curtains are 
appropriate window 
coverings. 

Since the provost marshal's 
office occupied a former 
home, window shades are 
appropriate window 
coverings. 

The provost marshal's office 
needed maps of the local 
area to conduct business. 



Acquire reproduction or 
period piece. 



Use HAFE 7002. 



Acquire reproduction. 



Acquire reproductions. 



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Use HAFE collection and 
acquire reproductions. 



NOTICES, handwritten 
and printed (on north and 
west walls) 



TRAIN SCHEDULE (on 
south wall) 



WASTEBASKETS, 3 (one 
near each desk and table) 



Notices of standing 
regulations and other 
orders were typically posted 
in a provost marshal's 
office. 

The provost marshal 
needed to be aware of the 
local train schedule in order 
to carry out his duties. 

The amount of paperwork 
generated in this office 
indicates a need for 
wastebaskets. 



Acquire reproductions. 



Acquire reproduction. 



Acquire period pieces. 



52 




s 

o 
o 

o 

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O 

J/) 



c/3 

O 
> 

o 



Recommended Furnishings 

Provost Marshal's office, room 104, (back) Building 



34. 



Object and Location 

DESK, 1 (against north 
wall in NW corner) 

TABLE with fall-front 
MILITARY DESK (between 
window and door, against 
west wall) 

CHAIRS, Windsor, 2 (one 
behind each desk) 

CABINET (north wall near 
door) 



WASTEBASKETS, 2 (one 
near each desk) 



LAMP, solar (on desk 
against north wall) 

CANDLESTICK (on 
windowsill in west wall) 



CANDLES, 3 (one in 
candlestick, others on sill 
next to candlestick) 

MATCHBOX, with matches 
(on sill next to candlestick) 

STOVE, with stovepipe 
(south wall) 

SANDBOX (under stove) 



Documentation 

Moulton letters, 8/14/64; 
figures 17, 18, and 20. 

Moulton letters, 8/14/64; 
figures 17, 18, and 20. 



Moulton letters, 12/27/63; 
figures 6, 8, 17-21. 

Military offices that 
generated large quantities 
of paperwork required large 
cabinets to file and store 
documents. 

The amount of paperwork 
generated in this office 
indicates a need for 
wastebaskets. 

Figure 19. 



Moulton letters, 12/27/63, 
indicates that clerks were 
required to work at night. 

Moulton letters, 12/27/63. 



Moulton letters, 12/27/63. 
Figure 7. 



A sandbox was a common 
period practice to protect 
the floor underneath a 
stove. 



Recommendation 



Use HAFE 6343. 



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Acquire period piece. 

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Acquire period piece. 
Acquire period piece. 
Acquire reproduction. 



54 



Provost Marshal's office, room 104, continued 
Object and Location Documentation 



Recommendation 



SHOVEL and TONGS 
(near stove) 

PENS, INK BOTTLES, 
PAPER SPEARS (assorted 
items on desks) 

PAPERS and FORMS 
(assortment of papers and 
forms on each desk and in 
cabinet) 

PLACARD, handwritten (on 
desk against north wall) 

PEGS, wooden, 2 (on east 
wall) 

SACKCOAT (on peg on east 
wall) 

DRESS COAT (on peg on 
east wall) 

CAPS, 2 (one on peg on 
east wall; one on desk 
against west wall) 

LEDGERS, 2 (on desk 
against west wall) 

BARREL, with ASSORTED 
KNIVES (in southwest 
corner) 

SHELL JACKETS, 
Confederate, 2 (draped over 
barrel) 



TRUNK, traveling, small 
(in southwest corner near 
barrel) 

SUGAR, in sack (in 
southwest corner near 
barrel) 



Army Regulations of 1861 
(1863), p. 162, para. 1088. 

Moulton letters, 10/18/63; 
figures 6, 7, 8, 17-19, 21. 



Moulton letters, 10/18/63, 
8/14/64, 12/9/63, 2/5/64, 
8/28/64; figures 6, 8, and 9. 



Moulton letters, 1171/63. 



Moulton letters, 3/1/64; 
figure 7. 

Moulton letters, 12/20/63, 

6/7/64. 

Moulton letters, 7/18/64. 



Moulton letters, 3/1/64; 
figures 7, 18, 19, and 20. 



Moulton letters, 8/14/64. 



Moulton letters, 10/7/64. 



Confederate clothing and 
other items were frequently 
confiscated by the provost 
marshal. 

Moulton letters, 10/18/63. 



Moulton letters, 6/21/64. 



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papers and forms. 



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Acquire reproductions; 
secure knives in barrel. 



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55 



Provost Marshal's office, room 104, continued 



Object and Location 



Documentation 



Recommendation 



HOSPITAL COT, with 
MATTRESS (in southeast 
corner) 

BEDROLL (on cot in 
southeast corner) 



Moulton letters, 2/5/64, 
11/1/63. 



Moulton letters, 2/5/64, 
11/1/63. 



Acquire reproductions 



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CURTAINS, 4 pr. (one pair 
at each window) 



WINDOW SHADES, 4 (one 
shade at each window) 



MAPS, 2 (one on east and 
north walls) 



PRINTING PRESS, on 
storage box (against east 
wall) 



NOTICES, printed (above 
printing press on east wall) 



Since the provost marshal's 
office occupied a former 
home, curtains are 
appropriate window 
coverings. 

Since the provost marshal's 
office occupied a former 
home, window shades are 
appropriate window 
coverings. 

The provost marshal 
needed maps of the local 
area to conduct business. 

The provost marshal 
needed to produce a variety 
of printed passes and 
notices. 

A variety of printed notices 
were issued by the provost 
marshal. 



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HAFE uncataloged 
(recently donated) 



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56 



Recommended Furnishings 
Exterior. 



Object and Location 

LITHOGRAPH, from 
Harpers Weekly (on west 
wall above clerk's desk) 

PLACARD, with pass room 
hours (posted on door) 

U.S. FLAG, ca. 1863-64, on 
flagpole (mounted on 
exterior wall near door) 

SIGN, "Provost Marshal" 
(mounted on exterior over 
door) 



Documentation 

Lithographs are 
appropriate informal wall 
decorations 

Moulton letters, 11/1763. 



Figure 11. 



Figures 10, 12, and 16. 



Recommendation 
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Concept for Interpretive Panels 

The purpose of these panels will be to explain the functions of a provost marshal's 
office and to describe what it was like to live in an occupied town during the Civil 
War. One panel will be located in the front room and one in the back room. 

Certain duties of the provost marshal's office, such as issuing passes for travel, 
seizing contraband, controlling the mail, administering the oath of allegiance, 
regulating prices, and preventing illegal liquor sales to soldiers impacted directly 
on the lives of the inhabitants of Harpers Ferry. 

Other duties included supervising the provost guard and prisons, capturing 
deserters, supervising stragglers, and completing the voluminous paperwork 
involved in all of the above. 

Possible illustrations: 

— Citizens of Charleston, S.C., Taking the Oath of Allegiance Soon After the 
Evacuation of the City by General Hardee, figure 6. 

— Issuing Passes at St. Louis, figure 7. 

— The Provo Marshal's Office on the East Side of Loudoun Street North of Water 
St., figure 11. 



57 



PART II 
THE GENERAL STORE 

ANALYSIS OF HISTORIC OCCUPANCY 

General Stores in Harpers Ferry During the Mid-Nineteenth Century 

The geographical and physical location of Harpers Ferry helped to promote the 
growth and expansion of its mercantile trade. With its close proximity to 
Washington, D.C. and its access to both land and water routes, Harpers Ferry was 
ideally situated for commercial enterprises. By 1851 Harpers Ferry was connected 
to the outside world by two bridges that accessed three major turnpikes, had a 
well established canal system along its riverbanks and was located on the route of 
two railroad companies. 175 

The residents of Harpers Ferry obtained the necessities of life from a variety of 
sources. Those with access to land undoubtedly kept a garden and perhaps 
livestock as well. Residents could also purchase food at the Harpers Ferry 
farmers market, described by war correspondent James Taylor in late summer 
1864: 

On the shore beside the North Abutment, a subject presented in the Harpers Ferry 
Market in full blast which holds forth each day, Sunday excepted-a privilege, from 
necessity, granted the farmers of the East bank of the Shenandoah [e.g., Loudoun 
County, Virginia-Confederate territory] irrespective of their political affiliations, 
providing they guarded their tongues and attend strictly to the business in hand, 
the disposal of their merchandise. 

The truck, as I made note, comprised butter, head cheese, eggs, poultry, beef, 
bacon, lamb, hams, spare ribs, new potatoes, and blackberries which were brought 
in sufficient quantities to supply the wants of the Ferryites and army mess 
caterers. 

Without the roped off space, or market, was a cordon of vigilant-eyed provo guards 
with loaded Enfields and orders to prevent, at all hazards, surreptitious 
communications passing between the disloyal residenters [sic] and secret emisaries 
[sicl of the Confederacy in the guise of hucksters, and to guard against spies 
slipping through the bound. 



176 National Park Service, A Compendium of the Commercial and Industrial Advertisements of the Business and 
Manufacturing Establishments of Harpers Ferry and the Island ofVirginius, 18241861, prepared by Charles W. Snell (Denver 
Service Center, 1973), pp. 11-14. 

176 Taylor, The James E. Taylor Sketchbook, pp. 30-31. 

58 



Items that could not be purchased at the farmers market could usually be found in 
a wide variety of retail establishments located in the lower town, including ready- 
made clothing stores, confectioneries, drug stores, and dry goods stores, among 
others. During the period 1850-1865 at least fifteen merchants sold dry goods in 
the Lower Town section of Harpers Ferry, but there were never more than six 
conducting business in the same year. 177 At the end of this chapter is a map 
locating Harpers Ferry merchants. 

Actually, the terms "dry goods" and "general store" are both essentially 
misnomers. Virtually all of these stores sold a wide variety of goods, including but 
not limited to food, liquor, medicine, tobacco products, housewares, ready-made 
clothing, hardware, books, stationery, as well as dry goods and notions. In 
Harpers Ferry, many of the stores specialized in one aspect of this trade. For 
example, Singleton Chambers sold a huge variety of dry goods but virtually no 
food. 178 On the other hand, Isaac Fleming sold a variety of food but no dry 
goods at all. 179 Merchants seldom referred to their establishments as dry goods 
or general stores, instead simply listing the merchandise available, the name of 
the proprietor, and occasionally the location of the store. 180 For the purposes of 
this report, all stores selling a variety of merchandise will be called general stores. 

Jefferson and Loudoun County general store inventories reveal the types of 
supplies available in nearby stores. Very little fresh meat, fruits, or vegetables 
appear in the inventories, although perishables must have been available 
occasionally at stores that took farm produce in trade. Probably most customers 
purchased fresh foods at the local market. The fact that fresh foods do not appear 
on the inventories may also indicate that trustees sold off perishable items quickly 
instead of waiting until the main auction was held. 

Stores did stock foods that had a long shelf life, like preserved meats and fish, 
crackers, cheese, dried fruit, and fruits preserved in jars. Although fruits and 
vegetables preserved in metal cans were available in the United States as early as 
1837, 181 evidence from inventories indicates that canned food was not regularly 



177 This information is condensed from National Park Service, "The Business Enterprises and Commercial Development of 
Harpers Ferry's Lower Town Area, 1803 to 1861," prepared by Charles W. Snell (HFNHP, NPS Historic Resource Study, 1973). 

178 Singleton Chambers Inventory, October 16, 1859, Will Book 16, pp. 252-57, JCC; also see inventories in Evidence of 
Original Furnishings in Part II, General Store section of this report. 

179 Isaac Fleming Inventory, September 23, 1853, Will Book 14, pp. 47-49, JCC; also see inventories in Evidence of Original 
Furnishings in Part II, General Store section of this report. 

180 See evidence section of this report for examples of advertisements. 

181 Alec Davis, Package and Print: The Development of Container and Label Design, (New York: Clarkson N. Potter, Inc., 
1967), p. 81. 

59 



stocked in local general stores in the 1850s. 182 The expense of canned food 
generally justified its use only in situations where food could not be regularly 
obtained in the usual fashion, for example, during long journeys overland or by 
sea or during a war. 183 In fact, the widespread use and acceptance of canned 
food probably dates to the years after the Civil War, when many soldiers became 
introduced to the concept of food in tins. 

The foodstuffs most commonly found in local stores are staple goods, including 
flour, sugar, rice, salt, coffee, tea, spices, extracts, tobacco (including cigars, snuff, 
and loose tobacco), molasses, oils, vinegar, and a variety of medicines. Stores also 
sold a surprising variety of condiments such as mustard, bottled pepper sauce, and 
catsup, leading one to speculate on the need to spice up what was probably a fairly 
monotonous diet. 

Storekeepers who obtained a license were allowed to sell liquor and wines in their 
stores. Probably the most widely available item besides tobacco was candy, 
indicating that general stores catered to the vices of both old and young. 

A variety of housewares could be purchased at many general stores, including 
dishes, knives and cutlery, tinware, ironware, glassware, stoneware, lighting 
supplies, and cleaning supplies. Some stores sold blind paper, wallpaper, rag 
carpeting, bedding, and other furnishing goods. The availability of indigo and 
other dyes indicates that some cloth finishing took place in local households. 

The large quantity and variety of textiles in the inventories suggests that 
members of local households also sewed their own clothes on a regular basis. The 
quality of cloth varied from rugged jean, a twilled cloth made from linen and 
cotton, to fine silks and satins. Crepe, a light silk fabric frequently used for 
mourning clothes, is often found on inventories. Stores that stocked a large 
quantity of cloth usually also stocked the patterns, buttons, thread, and other 
notions required for completing the garment. 

Items of clothing that could not be easily or fashionably made at home were also 
available at many general stores. Hats and caps, boots and shoes, and accessories 
such as fans, parasols, handkerchiefs, belts, socks, gloves, ties, bonnets, and 
collars appeared most commonly on the inventories. Pants, shirts, and vests 
appeared rarely, probably because the general store could not compete with the 



182 References to canned food indicate that it was scarce and expensive. Two cans of peas appear in the listing of the sale 
of the Isaac Rose property in Jefferson County in 1854 selling for $.31 each. In the same inventory, a working shirt sold for 
$.40, and four pounds of prunes for $.24. 

1M Admiral William Edward Parry took canned roasted veal on his voyage in search of a northwest passage in 1824. Alec 
Davis asserts that "the first satisfactory method of food preservation in containers was evolved in France early in the nineteenth 
century, to feed Napoleon's armies." Davis, Package and Print: Development of Container and Isabel Design, p. 80. 

60 



price and variety available in the local ready-made clothing stores. Personal items 
like hair accessories, cologne, toothbrushes, and luggage were also available. 

Some stores stocked stationery and books. Generally, the majority of books were 
schoolbooks, including such classics as the McGuffey Reader series. Bibles and 
hymnbooks were also popular. Naturally, writing paper, pens, pencils, ink, 
envelopes, slates, and slate pencils were also readily available. The musically 
inclined could acquire jews harps or violin strings. 

The stores that carried hardware usually stocked a variety of hand tools, locks, 
nails, and other fasteners. Harness and grooming supplies were often listed in the 
inventories. Plows and other agricultural equipment were available for the 
farmer. The hunter could supply himself with guns and ammunition, while the 
fisherman could acquire fishing line and hooks. Those who preferred to be 
independent of the local shoemaker and repairer could purchase shoemaking 
supplies. 

Illustrations of general stores in the nineteenth century invariably show a 
cramped and cluttered interior. Some stores tried to impose an order on the 
display by putting grocery items on one side of the store room (usually the right) 
and dry goods on the other. Glass, hardware, and crockery were often located to 
the rear of the store. 184 Certain store fittings appear to have been standard. 
Candy was typically stored in large glass jars and tea in metal canisters, both on 
shelves behind the counter. Frequently barrels, sacks of food, or other large items 
were slumped on the floor. At least one set of scales and weights stood on the 
counter, as well as wrapping paper and string. Paper bags, which did not become 
widely available until after the Civil War, appear locally in the 1863 inventory of 
goods in Thomas Rawlins hardware store. 185 More commonly, tea, coffee, spices 
or other "dry" items would be weighed and wrapped in paper, as evidenced by 
such entries as the listing of "7 papers polishing powders" in an 1857 inventory of 
Israel Russell's business. 186 

Goods once viewed as luxury items became increasingly common as improvements 
in the transportation systems of the latter half of the nineteenth century affected 
the volume and variety of merchandise offered for sale. As railroads replaced the 
canals as the major transporter, merchants were able to purchase goods at lower 
prices. Better and cheaper transportation also encouraged farmers to specialize in 
cash crops, freeing farmers from the need to patronize a single store which 



1M Larry Freeman, The Country Store, (Watkins Glen, NY: Century House, 1955), p. 18. 
1M Will Book 16/17. Addendum, p. 15, JCC. 
186 Deed Book 15, pp. 236-40, JCC. 

61 



assigned them credit for groceries and clothing. 187 In Harpers Ferry, deed books 
document the local practice of assigning the wages and powers of attorney of 
armory workers to town merchants as settlement on outstanding bills. 188 

The increasing trend towards a cash-based system in the mid-nineteenth century 
helped to offset the control of merchants over workers and farmers. The stores in 
Harpers Ferry reflect this change in business. In an announcement of his store's 
opening (in park building 45), John Price notifies the public that since his dry 
goods and grocery establishment will be "selling exclusively for Cash, he is 
enabled to sell at lower prices than at credit Stores...." 189 Thomas Peacher, who 
operated a business at the corner of Shenandoah and High Streets (park building 
12) advertised in 1856 that: 

....[he] would respectfully inform his friends and the public generally, that he has 
opened a large and well selected stock of Dry Goods, Groceries, Queensware, Books, 
Shoes, Hats, Caps, &c. in the Store Room known as "Stephenson's Corner" [sic] 
being on the corner of Main and High Streets, to which he invites the attention of 
all who desire to buy CHEAP for cash. Our goods having been purchased for cash 
we are enabled to sell 25 to 50 per [sic] cheaper than can be bought elsewhere. 190 

However, some merchants continued to accept produce in exchange for goods. 
James McGraw, who operated grocery and liquor stores on Shenandoah Street, 
advertised that he would take corn in exchange for merchandise as late as 
1876. 191 

In the early nineteenth century, most merchants made yearly buying trips to 
major cities or wholesale centers. Since goods tended to be scarce in the earlier 
years, merchants purchased whatever was available. 192 However, by mid- 
century transportation had improved to the point that merchants could easily 
travel twice a year to large eastern cities where a hugh selection of dry goods, 
clothing, and other items were readily available. Most merchants purchased stock 
in spring and fall to accommodate their customers clothing and dry goods needs 
during the changing seasons. Over and over the headlines announce the arrival of 
new stock: 



Freeman, The Country Store, p. 23. 



Deed Book 31, p. 25, JCC. In this example, A. McCan, an armory worker, gave his power of attorney to W. Anderson 
& Co., as well as assigning his wages to Anderson & Co. for January-July, 1850. 



IM 



1DO 



Virginia Free Press, January 24, 1856, p. 2. 

Ibid. 

1,1 NPS, HAFE Package 116, Historic Structures Report, History Section, p. 24. 
192 Freeman, The Country Store, pp. 24-25. 

62 



Great excitement! Fresh and New styles of spring and summer Goods 



193 



Latest Arrival. We have now completed opening our stock of Fall and Winter 
Goods. 194 

Just arrived, new and cheap. The undersigned has just returned from the Eastern 
Markets with the largest and most complete stock of Goods he has ever offered at 

,, • i 195 

this place. 

Both railroad and canal facilitated the transportation of these goods to Harpers 
Ferry. By the Civil War, a complex transportation network allowed the 
distribution of an amazing quantity of goods across most of the country. Although 
many products were sold in sophisticated packages, the bulk of items in a general 
store were sold the way they had been for centuries, singly or in packages made 
up by the storekeeper. To become more competitive, many storekeepers insisted 
on a cash only policy, although the barter system hung on in small towns through 
the nineteenth century. Thus, before the Civil War, the groundwork was laid for 
the great changes in merchandising that would occur in the last decades of the 
century. 



193 Virginia Free Press, August 11, 1859, p. 1, col. 2. 

194 Ibid., October 21, 1858, p. 3, col. 2. 
198 Ibid., April 20, 1854, p. 3, col. 2. 

63 




& Location of General Store/Dry Goods Merchants in Harpers Ferrv 1850-1865 

y v: x 



EVIDENCE OF ORIGINAL FURNISHINGS 

Discussion of Sources 

The furnishings plan for the general store is based on evidence from inventories, 
advertisements, and illustrations from the mid-nineteenth century. Inventories 
were collected from Jefferson and Loudoun counties for the years 1850-1860. An 
inventory was selected if it specifically mentioned that it contained articles from a 
general or dry goods store; if it was the inventory of a known general or dry goods 
merchant; or if it seemed to contain a quantity or variety of items too large for 
personal use. A total of 11 potentially useful inventories were collected and are 
reproduced in this report. 

Some inventories are more complete than others. Generally, inventories or lists of 
sales of the estate of a deceased merchant have been judged to be the most 
complete and, therefore, most accurately reflect the contents of the store. A list of 
items in a deed of trust is useful because it indicates the kinds of things in a 
particular store, but it is probably not complete since the owner usually selected 
specific items to use as collateral. 

Inventories were examined from both Jefferson and Loudoun counties in order to 
get a broad view of store merchandise while staying in the same geographic area. 
With a few minor exceptions, the list of furnishings is based solely on the 
inventory of Thomas Dorrell of Loudoun County. Close comparisons of all the 
inventories revealed that the Dorrell inventory was the most appropriate choice 
for this exhibit in terms of time period, quantity of merchandise, and variety of 
stock. Using one inventory exclusively assures that the refurnishing represents 
the actual contents of a particular store, and is not simply a compilation of typical 
general store items. This approach will result in the most historically accurate 
interior possible, given the constraints of available evidence. 

However, inventories do not usually give information concerning the placement of 
each item. For this information this report depends on comparative pictorial 
evidence, consisting largely of lithographs, paintings, drawings, billheads, and 
advertising material. This pictorial evidence dates from the 1850s through the 
end of the nineteenth century, although considerably more weight has been placed 
on the earlier evidence. 

Finally, advertisements from local newspapers for shops in Harpers Ferry and the 
surrounding communities supplied information on what was available at nearby 
stores. 



65 



Inventories 

The following inventories have been edited and reorganized into categories to 
facilitate comparisons. In most inventories the prices for each item listed have 
been deleted to save space. No objects have been deleted from the inventories; 
however, some items have been combined. For example, if 100 yards of calico was 
listed in the original inventory in five 20 yard lots, the fabric was listed in the 
edited inventory simply as "100 yards calico." The items have been divided into 
the following categories: food and containers; housewares; clothing and 
accessories; dry goods and notions; hardware; books and supplies; and store 
supplies. This arrangement assists the reader in ascertaining the particular 
specialty of a store, if one existed, or at least the relative emphases placed on 
different kinds of stock. 

The following inventories are reproduced in this report: 

Thomas S. Dorrell, Loudoun County, Va., 1854 

Harpers Ferry or Bolivar inventories: 

William Chambers (Harpers Ferry or Bolivar), 1858 
Israel Russell (Harpers Ferry), 1857 
Beckham and Coons (Harpers Ferry), 1856 
Isaac Fleming (Harpers Ferry), 1853 

Other Jefferson County inventories: 

Singleton Chambers, 1859 

Margaret House, 1856 

Joseph T. Grantham, 1853 

Isaac Rose, 1854 

Dolphin Drew, 1856 

Joseph Myers (Myerstown), 1867 

Thomas Rawlins, 1863 

Other Loudoun County inventories: 

James Johnston, 1854 
Benjamin D. Rathie, 1859 
S. Mahlon Nichols, 1859 
James H. Nichols, 1856 



66 



INVENTORY of THOMAS S. DORRELL 

Loudoun County 

1854 



Food and Containers 



99 [lbs?] Rice 

Jar & Prunes 

26 Pepper 

11 Jars & Candy 

387 [lbs?] Brown Sugar 

Lot of Pickels 

14 lbs. Ginger 

1 Box & Wafers 

1 Box Cigars 
222 [lbs?] Coffee 
30 Molasses 
Barrell & Mackrell 

2 Barrells & Herring 
Lot of Lard Gross 
Barrell & Salt 

43 1/4 lbs. Tea 
6 lbs. Tea 
11 lbs. Salratis 
Meat Hogshead 

5 Midlings New lbs. 92 
Lot Nettlest?] 

15 lbs. Allspice 
Pipes Gross 

1 Bot Snuff 

I 3/4 lbs. Nut Megs 
Box & Ginger 

4 [lbs?] Palm Nuts 

6 doz Bottles 

6 1/2 p Bottles 
8 Twists Tobacco 
146 lbs Tobacco 
Chocolate 
8 Mustard 

16 lbs. Coffee 

3 Bunches Nettlest?] 
Beans 

II Castor Oil 

1 Doz. Peppermint 

Cloth & Sage 

1 1/4 Cloves 

1 Paper Baking Pd 

20 Ga. Malaga Wine 

1 Bottle of Cod Liver Oil 

Lot of meat 

Segars 



2 Doz Bottles 
Bag of Onion Seed 
Damaged lbs. 50 
4 Black Tea 
Bag & Coffee 
87 Ga. Whiskey 
Barrell & Crackers 

2 lbs. Tea 

3 Whiskey Barrels 

4 Black Tea Ballance 
Lot of Oatmeal 

5 Flour Barrels 
5 Soles lbs. 40 

3 Shoulders lbs. 46 

3 Hams lbs. 78 

5 Shoulders lbs. 96 

35 Ga. French Brandy 

Salt & Sack 

5 1/2 Potatoes 

5 Potatoes 

5 Midlings New lbs. 102 

38 Ga. Rum 

4 Hams lbs. 64 

5 Potatoes 

Housewares 

6 Bowles 

8 Glass Plates 

5 Brooms 

3 Teapot 
2 TeaPot 

4 Knives 
2 Jugs 

6 Chambers 

5 Dishes 

2 Pictures & Frames 
8 Pen Knives 

6 Tumblers 

26 Small Mugs 

6 Bowles 

6 Bowls Common 

4 Bowles 

1 Stone Jar 

5 Bowles 



67 



T.S. Dorrell Inventory, 1854 (con't) 



2 pr Pitchers 

1 pr Decanters broke 
8 pr Decanters 
38 Tumblers 
12 Soap 
1 pr Dish 

3 Plates 

1 pr Decanters 

2 Comforts 
1 Waiter 

1 Waiter Large 
10 Blankets 

1 Bottle 
6 Bowles 

3 1/2 Doz plates 

5 Comforts 

2 Pitchers 

2 Glass Lamps 
Cups & Saucers 
15 [?] Soap 
Waiters 

3 Pitchers 
2 Teapots 

6 Bowles 

4 Jugs 

2 Cream Mugs 

5 1/2 Starch 

Wash Bowl & Pitcher 
8 P. Knives 

6 lbs. Starch 

101 1/2 [lbs?] Soap 
Soap Fat 
Bedstead 

4 Knives 

3 Linen Towels 

1 Table 

2 Stone Jars 

116 3/5 boxes B. Candles 
98 Cups 

1 Long Eight Day Clock 

2 Spittoons 
Stove &c 

6 Butcher Knives 

5 Salt Sets 
10 Soap 

2 Brooms 
1 Broom 
Lounge 



6 Cups & Saucers 

Sad Irons 

12 [lbs?] Soap 

1 Sconce & Pitcher 

1 Pitcher & Bowles 

3 Shaving Glasses 

Lot of Carpet 

Sieve 

Tray & Spoon 

Shovel & Tongs 

lRug 

20 Salts 

3 1/2 Doz. Spoons 
6 Pictures 

15 Mugs 

6 Cups & Saucers 

5 Grators 

Lot of Cracked Jugs 
1 P. Kettle 
Lot Bowles &c 

16 Bowles 

6 Plates 
Dish & Plates 
1 Jug 

1 Large Basket 
1 Sieve 

Clothing and Accessories 

4 pr. Shoes 

1 Bead Bag 
48 pr. Shoes 

2 pr. Boots 
2 Colongne 
10 pr. Combs 

2 Coats 

3 pr. Boots 
10 pr. Gloves 

9 prs Boots 

2 Vials No. 6 
8 pr Shoes 

10 pr. Gloves Ballance 

3 pr. Pants 

2 pr. Boots 

3 Vests 

1 pr. Pants 
8 Umbrellas 

4 Hands 



68 



T.S. Dorrell Inventory, 1854 (con't) 



25 Silk Hands 
8 Blk Hands 

1 pr Drawers 

2 Net Shirts 

3 pr. Pants 
2 Coats 

2 Vests 

4 Pr Drawers 
4 Shirts 

2 Shirts 
4 Hats 

4 Carpet Bags 
2 Port Monies 
32 pr. Hose 

15 Purses 

4 B Purses paid 

8 pr Socks 

9 P. Books 
Lot combs 
22 pr. combs 

10 pr. Gloves 
7 Straw Hats 
60 Combs 

6 side combs 

12 pr. side combs 
50 Combs 
2 Vests 

1 Shawl 

2 Combs 
Lot Combs 

2 Neck [Handkerchiefs?] 

7 Silk Hats 
1 Shawl 

8 P. Suspenders 
6 Side Combs 
24 Combs 

1 Hdf. 

1 Shawl 

1 Shirt 

Socks Little 

12 Pocket [Handkerchiefs?] 

Marbles 

16 prs. Shoes 
41 Fine Combs 

1 Handkerchief 

2 Razor Strop 

5 Umbrellas 

1 Handkerchief 



2 Handkerchiefs Gingham 

3 Handkerchiefs Cotton 
13 pr. Shoes 

ICoat 

30 Caps 

1 pr Shoes 

5 Coats 

20 Vests 

5 pr. Pants 

5 Vests 

Lot Shoe Strings 

7 Vests 

1 Satin Vest 

1 Handkerchief 

20 Gingham Hdf 

1 Vest 

5 Coats 

1 Shawl 

7 pr Pants 

3 Coat Pants 

1 pr Pants 

22 pr Suspenders 

2 Vests 
1 Coat 

1 Carpet Bag 

9 Pocket Boxes 

2 Cloth Coats 

3 Vests 

5 Handkerchiefs 

10 Handkerchiefs 

1 Carpet Bag 
ICoat 

3 pr Socks 

2 Trunks 
Coat & Hackle 
I.O.O.F. Regalia 
I.O.O.F. Regalia 
1 Gold Watch 

11 pr Shoes 

I Brush 

II Suspenders 
1 pr Shoes 

1 Vest 
Trunk 
1 Cloth Coat 

3 pr Shoes 

5 Slippers 

6 pr Boots 



69 



T.S. Dorrell Inventory, 1854 (con't) 



27 pr shoes 

3 pr Shoes Woman 

6 pr Shoes Mens 

Trunk 

1 Trunk 

1 pr Girls Shoes 

1 Shawl 

Pants &c 

1 Parasol 

1 Vest 

1 Coat 

1 Parasol 

1 pr Pants 

15 Handkerchiefs Gingn 

1 pr Shoes 
Coat Linen 

2 Razor Strops 

2 pr Shoes Off 

3 pr Shoes 
1 Vest 

1 pr Pants 
1 pr pants 

1 Green Jacket 

6 pr Gloves 

Dry Goods and Notions 

Lot of Remmants 

31 Twilled Cotton 

74 3/4 yds. Cotton Drilling 

33 V2 Calico 

11 yds. Netting 

65 yds. Laurel DB 

29 yds. Laurel D. Cotton 

39 yds. Shirting 

15 yds. Long Cloth 

39 yds. Cotton B 

54 1/2 Calico 

23 Calico Mouslin 

311/4 yds. Laurel B 

96 1/2 yds. Cotton 

7 yds. Cotton 

2 Lots of Needles 

8 Balls Tape 
Box & Cord 
Lot of Thimbles 
14 yds. Calico 
Box & Buttons 



Lot of Knitting n 
1 Gross Whalbone 

3 Gross Buttons 
1 Lot Buttons 

42 Cotton Wadding 

12 1/2 yds. Alpaca 
1 Lot Vest Buttons 
Lot Buttons 

9 Doz. sfkeins?] Silk 

Lot of Pins 

1 Lot Buttons Coat 

1 Doz. stkeins?] Silk Twist 

1 Lot of Buttons &c 

13 Flannel 

27 yds. Flannel 

30 Gingham 

24 Furniture Calico 

4 1/2 Plad Cotton 

24 yds. Satin Drilling 
16 yds. Calico 
102 yds. Calico 
111/4 Paper Gingham 
26 yds. Gingham 
511/2 yds. Gingham 

5 yds. Calico 

8 Satinette 
12 Cotton 

16 Red Flannel 

1 yds Jeans 

4 1/2 yds. Tweed 

24 yds. Linen Drilling 
7 3/4 yds. Hollan 

238 yds. Calico 
40 1/4 yds. Calico 

32 yds. Cotton 
196 3/4 yds. Calico 
4 3/4 yds. Gingham 
11 3/4 Plaid Cotton 

9 1/4 Flannel White 
69 1/2 yds. Calico 

17 1/4 Gingham 

25 Plad Cotton 

2 Lots Boss 

6 yds. Calico 
1 Coat Cloth 

33 1/2 Cambric 
4 Marino 

1 Coat Cloth 



70 



T.S. Dorrell Inventory, 1854 (con't) 



1 Bomba. Cloth 

215 yds. Black Cotton 

2 Cloth 

3 1/2 Cottonade 
8 Cottonade 
178 1/2 Calico 

8 1/2 yds. Undressed 

10 Calico 

7 Calico Ballance 
32 Calico 

40 Calico 
24 Calico 
3 Cotton 

19 1/2 Canton Flannel 

11 Linen Drilling 
3 3/4 Linsey 

1 3/4 Cambric 
6 Calico 

27 yds. Edging 
Thimbles 

F. Hooks 
15 Calico 

6 yds Cotton 
Tape 

2 Hooks & Eyes 
Lace 

2 Boxes Hooks & Eyes 
Bundle Tape 
Hooks & Eyes 
Hooks & Eyes 
Coat Check 
Coat Check 

7 yds Cotton 
19 yds Cotton 

8 Padding 

17 Cotton Jeans 

28 yds Cambric Green 
5 yds Tweed 

41 1/2 Ticking 
8 Flannel 

10 yds Twilled Cotton 

Jeans 

7 Cottonade 

7 3/4 Table Diaper 

2 Vest Patrons 

2 yds Tweed 

19 Cotton Jeans 

20 yds Twilled Cotton 



6 Linen Drilling 
21 Bed Ticking 
1 Doz. Boss 

9 1/2 Calico 

1 Piece of Cloth 
54 yds. Calico 

107 3/4 yds. Calico 

2 Vest Patrons 
23 yds. Cotton 

2 yds. Casimore 

5 1/2 yds. Calico 

11 3/4 yds. Mouslin 

3 1/2 yds. Ticking 
13 yds. Calico 

10 yds. C. Cambric 
8 [?] Thread 

11 Doz. Boss 
Lot of Boss 

20 172 yds. Calico 

19 yds. Green Cambric 

7 1/2 yds Cotton 

20 yds. Cambric 

11 yds. Cambric Ballance 
16 Calico 

7 3/4 yds. Gingham 

6 Check 

15 3/4 yds. F.W.D. Cotton 

10 yds. Cotton 

2 1/2 yds. Flannel 

Box & Buttons 

6 Check 

Box & Buttons 

10 1/2 Cottonade 

10 Check 

2 yds. Vesting 

3 yds. Satinette 
Vest Patron Satin 
2 1/2 yds. Sirge 

27 3/4 yds. Irish Linen 

8 Linsey 
10 Ticking 

2 Jeans 

3 Satinet 

9 3/4 Satinet 



71 



T.S. Dorrell Inventory, 1854 (con't) 



Hardware 

IKeg 

1 Wheel 

2 Barrels 
1 Hinge 

Lot Brick Mould 
Shot & Box 

1 Shot Gun 
Chain &c 
Barrel Keg 

4 Barrels 
Keg 
Tub 

5 Old Barrels 
5 Barrels 

Lot of Old Lumber 

Lot of Plank 

Barrell &c 

Lot of Plank 

Wheel Barrow 

Ax 

Ax & Saw 

2 Water Buckets 
Large Iron Pot 
Dog Iron 
Barrell 

IKeg 
Wheel 

1 Barrell 
Wood 
Hogshead 

Lot of Lumber (House) 

Saw 

Castor 

72 lbs. Shot 

14 3/4 lbs. Powder 

Rope & Brown? 

Barrell & Lime 

8 Lock Pad 

Mowing Scythe 

2 Barrels 
Keg & Pot 
Spade 
Shingles 
Hoe 

Sheep Shears 
Percussion Caps 



2 Spades 

77 lbs. 8 p[?] Nails 

Flints 

2 lbs. Indigo 

1 Pistol 

2 Doz. Tacks 
2 Castors 
3835 P. Caps 
Box of Glass 

4 1/4 doz. Tacks 
Tap Borer 
Curry Comb 
4 1/2 Saltpeter 
Lot of Cork 
20 lbs. Saltpetre 
19 Pasteboard 

2 Gross Matches 
Peg Cutter &c 
15 Blacking 

I Spade 
Saddle Bags 

9 Blk Brushes 

18 Lines or Bed Cord 

15 Cow Hides 

7 Lines 

4 Buckets 

4 White Wash B 

Books and Supplies 

3 Books 

II Pencils Lead 

1 Testament 

2 Vol. History of the World 
2 Books 

Robinson Crusa 
30 Paper 

8 Books 

9 1/2 Quires Paper 
Lot Slate Pnecils 
Book &c 

1 Book 

2 Boxes Pens 
Envelopes 



72 



T.S. Dorrell Inventory, 1854 (con't) 



Store Supplies 

Sundries 

Lot of Bags 

Sundries 

Lot of Boxes 

Boxes &c 

Fancy Box 

Lot of Old Barrels 

1 Ream W Paper 

2 Balls Twine 
Lot of Boxes 
Tobacco Knife 
14 Small Boxes 
Sundries 

21 Canisters 

1/2 Bushel Measure 

Counter Scales 

2 Canisters 
Scales & Weights 

3 Sacks 
2 Scoops 

1 Gal Measure &c 
Lot of Measure 
Boxes Lot 
Box &c 

1 Box 

Lot of Boxes 
Boxes &c 
Wrapping Paper 

2 Sacks 

1 Ledger 
Scale Beam &c 
Wrapping Paper 

Personal Items 

4 Shirts 

2 Towels 
Straw Bed 
Straw Bed 
1 Blanket 
1 Blanket 

3 Quilts 

Lot of Curtains 
Table Cloths 
Looking Glass 
1 pr. Bolster Cases 



4 Pillow Slips 

Cradle 

1 Counterpane 

1 Box 

Lot of Sundries 
Lot of Boxes 

2 Bags Shot 

3 Boxes &c 
Box & Wood 
Straw Bed 
Feather Bed 2 pieces 

4 Quilts 
Cot 

Lot of Sundries 

Feather Bed 2 pieces 

26 yds Carpet (good) 

Lot of Ironware 

Table Cover 

Griddle 

Cupboard 

Cook Stove 

Box & Bucket 

Bedstead Trundle 

1 Stove 

1 Bureau 

1 Clock 

Table 

Stuffer 

Oven & Lid 

1 pr. Bedstead 

15 yds Carpet (rug) 

Looking Glass 

1 Table & Cover 

1 Table & Cover (good) 

6 Chairs, Cane Seats 

6 Chairs 

Skillet 

Sofa 

Sad Irons 

Shovel & Tongs 

1 pr Blankets 

Unknown 

Lot of Bats 
Soats[?] 



73 



INVENTORY of WILLIAM CHAMBERS 

Harpers Ferry or Bolivar 

1858 



Food and containers 



Housewares 



270 Cigars 
Calomel 

19 Bottles Essences 

5 Bottles No. 6 

6 Bottles S. Lavender 

1 Bottle Laudanum 

6 Bottle hive syrup 
13 Bottles paregoric 

2 Bottles Castor oil 

21 Bottles packages - E. Coffee 

22 lbs. s. snuff 
4 lbs Candies 
2 lbs Lickorice 

2 3/4 lbs Allspice 
49 Tobacco 

32 lbs. black Pepper 

1 1/2 Tea 

33 lbs. Ginger 

7 lbs Al spice 
11 lbs. B. soda 

3 gals, molasses 

2 W. Barrels 

10 gals, vinegar 

1 vin-Barrel 

32 bush Bran & shorts 
61 lbs. S. sugar 
173 bble mackerel 

20 1/4 lbs. Candy 
6 Bush potatoes 
6 12 oz. mace 

93 1/2 lbs. coffee 
120 lbs. sugar 

21 lbs. Rice 

2 sacks of salt 



24 B. Candle Wick 
2 salt Boxes 

9 sheets wadding 
15 Comforts 

8 Blacking Brushes 

2 brass - C. sticks 

4 pair snuffers 
17 lbs. Candles 

25 yds. blind paper 

3 tin Buckets 

7 wash pans 

3 tin dinner Buckets 

1 tea Kettle 

5 coffee pots 

11 tin cups 

2 frying pans 

2 Grid Irons 

10 common Pitchers 

3 Tea pots 

55 glass Tumblers 

12 - Dishes 
12 - plates 

8 - mugs 

6 - sugar Bowls 

1/2 doze, cups & saucers 

9 clothes Lines 

7 w. wash Brushes 
64 cakes soap 

1 1/8 lbs starch 

100 Candles 

5 1/4 yds. Rag Carpet 

42 lbs. Hard soap 

1 Glass Jar and Camphene 

1 pair C. sticks 

1 stone Jar & Bowl 

29 lbs - washing soda 

37 Corn Brooms 

10 Buckets 
35 lbs starch 
20 lbs. Powder 

1 stone Jar 

2 pans & Bucket 

4 flat irons 



74 



W. Chambers Inventory, 1858 (con't) 



Clothing and accessories 

1 B. fur Hat 
1 pair T Clothes 

1 pair pants 
13 Fans 

2 W shawls 

2 Parasols 

15 L. Handkerchiefs 
1 shawl 

163 pairs of shoes (various prices) 

21 pairs of Boots 

52 pairs white Hose 

61 pairs colored Hose 

8 pair Black Hose 

13 pair m? & B sock 

38 pair C. stockings 

3 Fans 

6 Watch Guards 
3 purses 

29 silk Handkfs. 
57 Cotton Handkfs. 

I Cotton shawl 

3 razor strops 

10 pairs white C. Gloves 

16 pairs Ladies kid Gloves 

4 pair Gentleman's kid Gloves 
49 pairs black C Gloves 

10 pairs woollen Gloves 

7 pairs Bows Suspenders 

II pairs mens Suspenders 
1 pair B. Hose 

21 pairs hair pins 

8 pairs S. Combs 

18 1/2 pairs tuck Combs 

20 pairs pocket Combs 

7 fine pocket Combs 

10 straw Hats 

4 neck ties 

3 B silk Handkf 

7 Hats 

12 Caps 

1 black satin vest 



7 yds of green Flannel 

28 1/2 yds of white Flannel 
38 1/2 yds of Red Flannel 
1/2 yds of white Flannel 
26 yds of Cassinett 
10 1/4 yds. Casimere 

8 1/2 yds. Tweed 

17 3/4 yds. K Jeanes 
2 1/2 yds. Plaid 
70 Cotton Bats 

25 yds. Lawn 

5 1/4 yds. Gingham 
17 1/8 mouslin 
122 3/4 black Cambric 
10 3/4 yds K - Jeans 
68 yds Cambric 

34 yds Calico 

283 yds Gingham (various prices) 
117 3/4 yds Domestic Cotton 
22 1/2 yds Plaid 
55 yds Alpacka 
19 1/4 yds. mouslin 

35 1/2 yds. Alpacka 
22 1/2 yds Linen 
42 yds P. Cambric 
19 1/4 yds B Holland 
22 1/2 yds. C. Diaper 
41 1/2 yds. B. cotton 
34 yds B. Holland 

26 yds. C. Drilling 
40 yds. Check 

37 yds. Ticking 
5 yds Cotton 

34 3/4 yds Drilling 

197 yds Cotton (various prices) 

7 1/4 yds. of C. Shirting 

16 1/4 yds. of Gingham 

38 yds. of Der Baise 

1 3/4 yds. of B Holland 

768.75 yds Calico (various prices) 

14 3/4 yds. Nankeen 

212.25 yds. unbleached cotton 

27 1/4 yds. Cotton Flannel 



Dry goods and notions 

Dry goods sold in 126 lots. 
18 1/2 yds of cotton Flannel 



75 



W. Chambers Inventory, 1858 (con't) 



29 1/4 yds. C. Calico 

47 3/4 yds Irish Linen 

30 1/4 B. muslin 

6 1/4 yds. Casimuslin 
10 yds. Casinet 

23 3/4 yds C. Fringe 
15 yds B. mouslin 

50 1/4 yds Debaise 
12 1/4 yds Diaper 
10 5/8 yds. satinet 
3/4 yd. B. silk 

2 3/8 yds. B. satin 
75 1/4 yds. Cambric 

7 1/4 yds. Green Bilrage(?) 

2 yards Brown Bilrage(?) 
77 3/4 worsted 

17 1/2 doz. Brass Buttons 

57 2/3 B. horn Buttons 

9 5/6 B. w. Buttons 

14 2/3 doz. B. Lasting buttons 

12 1/2 doz. B. horn Buttons 
17 5/6 doz. B. Lasting Buttons 
9 Doz. B. silk Buttons 

3 1/2 doz B. Jet Buttons 

8 doz. mole Buttons 

75 1/4 doz C shirt Buttons 
19 1/2 doz. pearl Buttons 
7 doz. Pins 

48 3/4 yds. of B. Crepe 
79 pieces Black Binding 

13 pieces Tape 

3 1/2 lbs. skein Cotton 
1 lb. Thread 

7 1/4 doz whalebones 
42 Bunches Bobinet 
6 steel p. Beads 

93 Thimbles 

8 pieces silk Braid 

1 1/2 doz. gilt Buttons 
1/2 lbs. sewing silk 
1 vest pattern 
Remnant of Calico 

51 1/12 doz. spool Boss 
3 5/12 doz. Cord 

3 doz. Braid 

4 spools Floss 

39 skeins worsted 

1 1/2 lbs. knitting Cotton 



9 paper needles 
7 sets knitting needles 
17 cards hooks & eyes 
13 1/2 doz silk Buttons 
62 3/4 yds. Fringe 
245 3/4 yds. Lace 
415 1/4 yds. Ribbon 

Hardware 

3 Curry Combs 

2 paint Brushes 

1 gross screws 

4 pairs shears 

9 pairs scissors 

5 plane Bitts 

6 large Gimblets 
11 small Gimblets 
16 saw Files 

29 doz Screws 

5 pad Locks 

3 butcher Knives 

26 pairs 4 in. Hinges 

7 1/2 pairs 3 in. Hinges 

8 pairs 1 1/2 in. Hinges 
11 pen Knives 

11 barlow knives 

6 small pen knives 
179 papers of Tacks 
3 1/2 lbs. Indigo 

3 Hoes 

3 mason's Lines 

10 balls Twine 

13 1/4 dose F. Hooks 

4 Latches 

2 Door Locks 
39 lbs. shot 

1 Tobacco Knife 
273 lbs. nails 

8 pitchforks 

2 Rakes 

2 spades & Hoe 

11 mason's Lines 



76 



W. Chambers Inventory, 1858 (con't) 



Books and supplies 

15 1/2 quires F.C. Paper 
19 quires Letter Paper 
1 lot slate pencils 

15 copies of Bon(?) spellers 

16 McGuffey's 1st. Reader 
5 McGuffey's 2 Reader 

14 McGuffey's 3 Reader 
3 McGuffey's speller 

1 McGuffey's 4th Reader 
9 " W. Dictionary 

26 " P. Arithmetic 

8 " S.E. Grammar 

9 " Copy Books 
12 Primers 

3 copy swift N. Philosophy 

10 picture Books 
5 Slates 

9 lead pencils 
14 pen holders 

2 gross pens 

4 packages Envelopes 
16 bottles Ink 

2 Reams paper 
57 dose Pens 



77 



INVENTORY of ISRAEL RUSSELL 

Harpers Ferry 

1857 



Food and containers 

18 Boxes Blackberry 
6 Boxes Mustard 

6 Sacks table salt 

1 lot cloves & Jar 

2 Jars preserved damsons 
1 Lot of Mace & Jar 

8 lbs dried currants 
23 lbs Black Tea 
17 Boles Black Tea 
26 lbs Blk pepper 

1 lot allspice & pepper 
6 1/2 lbs Grouse Ginger 

19 papers cut & dried tobacco 

4 wky Barrels 

3 half Barrels 

2 molasses galls 

5 empty flour bblls 

Housewares 



6 pr. Ladies slippers 
6 pr. Gent canvas 
5 pr. shoes 

10 pr. Ladies pumps heeled 
2 pr. shoes 

Hardware 

2 Bottles Varnish 
1/2 lb Indigo 
28 lbs salt Petre 

11 lbs madder 
31 lbs copperas 
23 lbs sal cratns 
2 lbs alum 

1 Tobacco knife 
1 Peg cutter punch & scrape 
1 1/2 Boxes Glass 10x12 
1 lot of spiggots 

Books 



7 clay pipes 

7 papers polishing powders 

8 1/2 lbs Epsom slats 
6 Glass Jars 

1 Stone Jar 

13 Boxes Blacking 

14 lbs sla. soda 

6 Polishing Powders 

2 Water Buckets 
230 brooms 

4 pair Candlesticks 

Clothing 

2 pr. Boys Boots 
10 pr. Boys shoes 
1 pr. add shoes [?] 

8 pr. coarse boys shoes 
1 pr fine Boots no 11 

1 pr. fine Boots no 12 
1 pr. coarse Boots 

9 pr. Brogans 

3 pr. fine shoes misses 
3 pr. Ladies shoes 



1 perpetual Almanac 
Store supplies 

2 Tea Cannisters 
5 Sugar Boxes 
10 Barrel covers 

2 Reams wrapping paper 

1 pr. scales & weights 

1 24 Hour clock 

1 coal stove & pipe 

1 writing desk 

5 Empty Boxes 

1 Lot measures and [??1 

1 pr. platform scales 

1 Peck & half Peck measure 

1 Thermometer 
7 glass Jars 

2 tea canisters 

2 pairs scales & weights 

1 ten plate stove & pipe 

2 half bushels & peck measure 



78 



INVENTORY of BECKHAM and COONS 

Harpers Ferry 

May 1856 



Food and containers 

1 Bll oil 

40 or more whiskey oil and other empty Blls 
80 galls Sperm & oil 
20 Blls Whiskey, Brandy 
and other Liquors 

2 dz bottles french Brandy 
3 " " Champagne Wine 
80 Gallons Vinegar 

12 " Mustard 
40 Galls Molasses 

4 dz Eperen(?) Coffee 

100 lbs Imperial & other tea 
300 lbs Coffee 

500 lbs Brown & White Sugar 
75 lbs tobacco 

Housewares 

5 trunks 

24 tubs Assorted Sizes 

1 Dz looking glasses 

5 Bureaus. 6 Tables, 4 Safes 

4 pr Bedsteads 4 Washstand 

150 yds Ingrain list and Rag Carpet 

12 pr Blankets 

150 yds ticking 

40 lb(?) Starch 

1 copper Tea kettle 

3 iron Do 

1 Hearth rug 

24 pair Table Cloths 

2 Clocks 

2 dz glass and other Lamps 

4 dz willow and other baskets 
1 Dz Lanterns 

10 Dz Corn Brooms 
10 sets knives and forks 
200 lbs Tallow, Sperm and adam(?) 
candles 

1 Dz Coffee mills 

100 lbs Rozin and Castile soap 

2 Cooking Stoves 

2 Coal egg(??) Stoves 
1 Tailor Stove 



1200 more(?) SiRers 

2 dz iron pans 

400 or more tinpans 
40 dz Silver Britania Tin & 
other Spoons 

3 Bellmetal Kettle 

1000 or more Queensware 
such as Dishes, Cups, Saucers 
Bowls plates, tea ware 
Dining ware Pitchers & c 

51 glass Bottles Assorted 

3 Stocks of Stock Dyes 
100 Stone & other Jugs 
2 Dz Waiters Assorted 

4 dz or more glasses and tumblers 

Clothing and Accessories 

12 Blanket shawls 
2 Dz umberelleas 
1 2(??) carpet Bags 
80 pr Half Hose 

80 pr stockings 
4 Dz Suspenders 
1 Dz Vests 

1 Dz pants 

75 pr Boots & Shoes 

4 dz or more Silk B(?) and other 

hats 
4 dz Bullskin gloves 

Drygoods, notions 

81 lbs (?) cotton thread 
24 doz spools boss 

80 or more pieces Calico 
1000 skeins silk 

50 or more pieces Brown Cotton 
1 Gross Brass and other buttons 
4 pieces check 
8 pieces Linsey 
21 pieces cloth and Cassimere 
200 yds irish and other Linen 
4000 yds Insertion Edging 
200 yds Cambric 
& Lace 



79 



Beckham and Coons Inventory, 1856 (con't) 



100 yds flannel 

200 yds Blk and Col'd Silk 

4 pieces Linen Cotton & c 

300 yds osnaburg & cottondrills 

100 cuts of yarn 

200 yds Bleach (??) cotton 

2 dz Calf Skin 

50 yds Swiss muslin 

2 dz Sheep Skins 

100 yds Linen Cambric 

400 lbs sole Leather 

Hardware 

2 cross cut Saws 

4 doz shovels and spades and forks 

1 mill Saw 

2 Galls Varnish 

150 lbs Tow & and other Rope 

3 Dz Bed Cords 

10 lbs wrapping twine 
1/2 dz Halter chains 
6 Dz Balls Hemp twine 
1/2 " Spring valances 
10 lbs candle wick 
150 lbs white lead 

2 Blocks and tables 

1 Saddle 2 Dz Bridles 

4 pr cart (?)urs 4 hip straps 

3 Sprit Levels 

4 dz wooden & metal Spigots 
3 dz Augurs and Augur Bits 

1 Dz Steel & other Squares 

5 pr Scales and Weights 

12 or more Hand and other Saws 

3 dz or more Broad and other axes 

12 Doz Planes 

300 lbs Cart and Blester steel 

450 lbs or more of cutnails 

300 lbs Horseshoe nails 

50 or More Assorted Buckets 

2 tons or more (??) Iron 

3 dz Trace and other Chains 
50 or more Mineral, Knob 

Tad(?), house and other Locks 
3000 Second Hand & new files 
30 Gross or more wood Screws 
2 Double Bll Guns 1 Rifle 



2 Blacksmith Anvils 
1 do Vice 
1 do Bellows 

Books and school supplies 

800 Book Bilbles [Bibles] Testaments &c 

Store supplies 

24 Glass Candy Jars 



80 



INVENTORY of ISAAC FLEMING 

Harpers Ferry 

1853 



Food and Containers 

25 papers Extract of coffee 

5 bottles Ess. Peppermint 
1 1/2 lbs Cinnamon 

14 oz. Figs 

12 lbs Ginger 

7 Boxes Mustard 

6 boxes yeast powder 
90 13/16 lbs loaf suger 
1 box Mustard 

738 segars 

1 Jar nutmegs 

6 Glass Jars with candy 

1 do. med 

11 1/2 lbs prunes 
6 3/4 Allspice 

2 3/4 of Salt 

6 lbs black pepper 
43 1/2 crushed Sugar 
46 172 Tobacco 
39 lbs Tobacco 
Lot of dried apples 
Lot of dried peaches 
9 papers Black Tea 
23 lbs Hyson Tea 

73 1/2 lbs snuff 
214 lbs coffee 

238 lbs Brown sugar 

15 1/2 lbs. Rice 
1/2 bbl Herring 
1 Bbl vinegar 

1 Bbl. salt in sand 

27 Flour Bbls 

9 lbs Flour 

5 3/4 Bush, corn meal 

8 Galls molasses 

74 1/2 Galls mollasses & bbl 
97 lbs lard 

Housewares 

Tin can 

39 cakes soap 

1 Glass Jar 

13 Boxes matches 



22 1/2 starch 

4 Boxes blacking 

Tin can 

20 lbs palm Soap 

20 3/4 lbs mould candles 

284 3/4 lbs Rags 

3 Baskets 
Foot Mat 

4 stove pipe crocks 
15 Earthen jars 

2 Earthen chambers 

43 crocks 

Lot of pipes 

Basket 

Case of Drawers 

2 Stone Jars 

Clothing 

32 Bush shirts 

Hardware 

5 3/4 of madder 
8 lbs Pearlash 
Tobacco knife 

Books and supplies 

3 Bottles Ink 

22 No. Family Devotion 

4 quires paper 
8 quires cap 

Store supplies 

Wrapping paper 

2 Scales & Weights 

27 in Scoops 

4 Tin measures 

Funnel 

Lot of Bbls & boxes awning 



81 



INVENTORY of SINGLETON CHAMBERS, dec'd 

Jefferson County 

1859 



Food and containers 

3 pepper Boxes (sold in 2 lots) 
3 Hives Bees (sold sep.) 

Housewares 

1 Teapot 

2 china Bowls @ 15 

3 Dishes (sold sep.) 

4 Bowls (sold in 2 lots) 
2 china Bowls @ 9 

1 candle mould 

1 [carmel?] coal lamp 

32 Marbles (sold in 4 lots) 

4 tin cups (sold in 2 lots) 

2 coffee Boilers (sold sep.) 

1 Dish 

2 Butter plates @ 3 

2 sets [?] plate (sold sep.) 
1 coffee Boiler 

1 set china plates 

1 Pitcher 

1 fcannel?] coal Lamp 

1 large Dish 

1 Pitcher 

1 Teapot 

1 pr. Slat cellars 

3 Teapots (sold sep.) 

2 Bowls @ 4 
2 Bowls @ 4 

2 china Bowls @ 13 

2 sets cups & saucers (sold sep.) 

1 Pitcher 

2 Blankets @ 1.40 

5 Dishes (sold in 3 lots) 

2 Bowls @ 4 

10 Dishes (sold in 5 lots) 

3 sets china plates (sold sep.) 
2 Tea pots (sold sep.) 

2 Pitchers @ 8 

1 set cups & saucers 

4 Bowls (sold in 2 lots) 

12 Tumblers (sold in 2 lots) 
1 sugar Bowl 
1 Tea pot 



Clothing and accessories 

4 prs. Lambs' wool Hose (sold in 3 lots) 

1 Shaving Box & Brush 

2 prs. children's Hose @ 12 \J2 
16 prs. Hose @ 8 (sold in 8 lots) 
2 prs. kid Gloves (sold sep.) 

2 cotton Hdkfs. @ 4 

2 prs. Woolen Gloves (sold sep.) 

1 Leather Belt 

2 pr. cotton hose @ 8 
1 Buffalo comb 

10 prs. Lambs' Wool hose (sold in 4 lots) 
1 Round comb 

4 Bottles cologne (sold sep.) 
1 port monie 

1 Buffalo comb 

2 Silk Hdkfs. (sold sep.) 
1 Buffalo Comb 

1 pr. Gloves 

9 prs. Suspenders (sold in 5 lots) 

2 pr. cotton Hose @ 7 
2 Palm Leaf Fans @ 2 

10 Leather Belts (sold in 9 lots) 

1 Silk Handkerchief 

2 Round combs 
1 Port monie 

5 Silk Hdkf.(sold separately) 

5 port monies (sold separately) 
1 pr. kid Gloves 

1 Port monie[?J 

6 silk Handkerchiefs @ 37 V2 

2 cotton Hdkfs. @ 7 

6 Round combs @ 5 (sold in 3 lots) 
1 pr. Gloves 

1 Leather Belt 

5 prs. Suspenders (sold sep.) 

2 Bottles Cologne (sold sep.) 

1 Shaving Box & brush 

2 cotton hdkfs. @ 4 (sold sep.) 
1 pr. cotton hose 



82 



S. Chambers Inventory, 1859 (con't) 



Dry goods and notions 

6 1/4 yds. cambric @ 7 

8 yds. Calico @ 8 

10 yds. mouselin @ 15 

8 yds. Gingham @ 7 1/2 

9 yds. Gingham @ 7 

8 yds. cambric @ 7 
6 yds. cambric @ 7 

3 yds. cambric @ 7 

32 yds. Furniture calico @ 6 1/2 
14 yds. Lawn at 6 1/4 
12 yds. cotton @ 3 

9 yds. Lawn at 6 1/4 

32 yds. Lawn at 6 174 

4 yds. calico @ 7 

12 yds. Furniture calico @ 6 1/4 

10 yds. cotton @ 3 

1 3/4 yds. Berage @ 35 

11 yds. cotton @ 3 

20 yds. cotton @ 12 1/2 
14 yds. Lawn @ 6 1/4 
1 yd. Lawn 

4 yds. Lawn @ 12 1/2 

10 yds. Gingham @ 8 1/2 
6 yds. Gingham @ 8 
6 3/4 yds. Jeans @ 16 
14 yds. bleach'd Cotton @ 5 

33 1/2 yds. Calico @ 8 
1 Lot Brass hoops 

1 lot Buttons 

12 yds. bleach'd Cotton @ 4 
8 yds. bleach'd Cotton @ 4 
10 yds. mouselin @ 20 

14 yds. Gingham @ 7 
14 yds. Drilling @ 6 
10 yds. Drilling @ 5 1/2 
10 yds. Drilling @ 6 

5 yds. Edging @ 2 

32 yds. Brown cotton @ 12 1/2 
14 yds. Linsey @ 17 
4 yds. Edging @ 2 

6 yds. Jean @ 26 
4 yds. Jean @ 29 

10 yds. Calico @ 7 1/2 

6 yds. Jean @ 19 

111/4 yds. Ticking @ 13 1/2 

13 yds. Ticking @ 15 

3 Dress Patterns (sold separately) 



33 1/4 yds. Edging @ 2 

3 yds. cotton Flannel @ 9 
6 yds. cotton Flannel @ 8 
42 yds. Calico @ 7 

5 yds. cotton Flannel @ 8 1/2 
10 yds. cotton Flannel @ 8 1/2 

14 yds. Furniture calico @ 10 

4 yds. cotton Flannel @ 9 
111/4 yds. Ticking @ 14 

13 3/4 yds. Furniture Calico @ 10 
12 3/4 yds. Calico @ 10 1/2 

6 yds. Jean @ 18 

6 yds. Gingham @ 15 
6 yds. Linsey @ 24 
9yds. Calico® 11 1/2 

6 yds. Linsey @ 20 
48 yds. Linsey @ 20 

24 7/8 yds. Linsey @ 20 
311/2 yds. Linsey @ 12 1/2 
20 yds. Calico @ 9 1/2 

3 1/2 yds Flannel @ 20 

7 yds. Cambric @ 8 1/2 

5 yds. Flannel @ 38 
7 yds Flannel @ 25 

9 yds. Gingham @ 18 3/4 
3 yds. cotton Flannel @ 9 

10 yds. Gingham @ 15 

2 yds. Brown cotton @ 10 

3 yds. Gingham @ 15 

32 yds. Gingham @ 7 1/4 
10 yds. calico @ 9 1/4 
10 yds. Brown cotton @ 11 
29 1/2 yds. cambric @ 6 1/2 
10 yds. cambric @ 6 1/2 
18 yds. calico @ 5 1/2 
39 yds. calico @ 6 1/2 

25 yds. Brown cotton @ 11 

3 1/2 yds. Brown cotton @ 10 
27 yds. Brown cotton @ 10 1/4 
17 yds. calico @ 8 1/2 

15 yds. Black cotton @ 6 1/2 

4 1/4 yds. cotton Diaper @ 18 3/4 

6 yds. cotton Diaper @ 18 3/4 

32 1/2 yds. Brown cotton @ 10 3/4 
10 yds. cotton Diaper @ 19 
32 yds. calico @ 6 1/2 

9 yds. calico @ 6 1/2 

10 yds. Gingham @ 13 

2 1/4 yds. Blk alpaca @ 26 



83 



S. Chambers Inventory, 1859 (con't) 



1 1/8 yds. Blk Alpaca @ 19 
30 yds. cambric ©6 1/4 
7 1/2 yds. Gingham @ 14 
29 1/2 yds. Calico ©8 1/2 
10 yds. ticking ©11 

9 1/2 yds. calico © 11 
29 yds. calico © 8 3/4 
1 Remnant calico 

12 yds. calico © 7 

5 yds. cambric © 7 1/2 

10 yds. cambric © 7 1/2 
5 yds. cambric © 8 

Dry goods and notions 

5 yds. cambric © 7 1/2 
10 yds. calico © 9 

Hardware 

1 Ten plate stove 

1 tin Bucket 

1 Cooking Stove & apparatus 

1 Rifle 

Store supplies 

1 empty Barrel 
1 Empty Barrel 



84 



INVENTORY of MARGARET HOUSE 

Jefferson County 

1856 



Food and Containers 

3 glass jars 

1 can of allspice 

1 m tea 

1 box of tobacco 

9 lbs Impl tea 

21 lbs tea 

1 jar 

3 glass jars 

1 can of mustard 
40 11/16 lbs tea 
1 w. tea 
62 nutmegs 

1 lot segars 250 
25 lbs saleratus 

2 lbs ginger 
5 lbs mace 
cinnamon 

8 nutmegs 

1 jar preserved ginger 

1 jar preserved ginger 

4 lbs allspice 
14 nutmegs 

Housewares 

1 wash bowl 

2 tin cups 

14 balls candlewick 
1 tin pan 

3 balls candle wick 
1 tin pan 

5 balls candlewick 

Clothing and Accessories 

1 glazed cap 

1 pr boots 

2 pr boots 

3 pr shoes 

1 cloth cap 

2 cotton umbrellas 

13 cotton handkerchiefs 

4 boys caps 
1 cap 



2 pr ladies shoes 

1 pr shoes 

2 pr ladies boots 
1 pr boots 

1 pr gingham 
1 pr boys boots 

1 cotton handkerchief 

2 pr ladies shoes no. 1 
1 pr shoes 

1 cap glazed 

1 wool hat 

2 kossuth 

2 p. leaf hats 
1 velvet cap 

I pr Fine boots 

4 caps with covers 

II pr black gloves 
1 pr shoes 

1 cap 

1 pr crepe 

5 pr gloves 

6 cloth caps 

1 pr shoes 
10 pr shoes 

2 caps 

1 pr boots boys fine 

3 pr suspenders 

4 military caps 
1 pr boots 

3 caps 

1 pr shoes 
3 pr shoes 

2 caps 

1 cap 

3 pr boys fine boots 

2 pr coarse boots 

1 pr ladies shoes 

2 pr mens fine boots 
2 p. leaf hats 

1 straw hat 

2 pr H. shoes 

1 glazed cap 

3 pr shoes 

4 p. leaf hats 

2 pr shoes 

1 slouch hat 



85 



M. House Inventory, 1856 (con't) 



1 pr boots 
1 umbrella 
3 pr Kid shoes 

6 m suspenders 
1 pr boots 

1 pr shoes 

1 pr small shoes 

2 pr slippers 

9 1. pocket handkerchiefs 

2 pr shoes 

1 silk pocket handkerchiefs 

1 pr coarse boots 

2 pr lad leather boots 
1 p. leaf hat 

7 silk handkerchiefs 

1 pr heavy shoes 
6 pr slippers 

2 white kossuth hat 
1 mans slouch hat 

1 boys cap 

2 pr shoes 

2 pr slippers 

1 pr suspenders 

1 cotton handkerchief 

3 pr suspenders 

1 cloth cap 

2 pr woman heavy shoes 
1 pr shoes 

3 pr woman heavy shoes 50 

1 pr boys boots 
3 pr boys shoes 

2 pr boys boots little 
2 pr shoes 

1 cloth coVd cap 

2 cotton handkerchiefs 
1 pr mits 

1 glazed cap 

3 pair shoes 

1 pr boots no: 11 

2 pr boys shoes 

2 cotton handkerchiefs 
1 black wool hat 

1 slouch hat 

3 straw hats 

2 pair shoes 
1 pr socks 

1 pr boys boots 
6 pr gloves 



1 pr boots 
1 pr Fine boots 
1 glazed cap 
1 pr slippers 

Dry Goods and Notions 

3 pr ribbon 
1 vest pattern 
12 doz insertions 

3 doz skeins black boss 

4 3/4 doz agate buttons 
1 doz vest buttons 

14 5/6 doz brass buttons 

12 doz vest buttons 

3 doz hooks & eyes 

14 1/6 doz black vest buttons 

17 1/2 yds bonnet ribbon 

3 vest patterns 

1 lot thread 

1 doz agate buttons 
12 balls black tape 

3 vest patterns 

12 1/2 yds bro drilling 

2 vest patterns 
17 1/2 yds table ? 
1 vest pattern 

38 1/4 yds ticking 
28 yds cotton drilling 
6 3/4 yds muslin 

5 doz agate buttons 
140 skeins silk 

12 skeins silk 

4 bunches whalebone 

1 lot buttons 

4 1/2 yds black calico 

10 yds insertion 
lot of edging 

19 1/2 doz buttons 
28 yd bonnet ribbon 

2 bunches whalebones 
27 3/4 yds muslin 

11 yds calico 

5 vest patterns 
11 yds calico 

9 1/4 yds muslin 
1 yd black cambric 
22 3/4 yds calico 



86 



M. House Inventory, 1856 (con't) 

31 yds edging 1 pen holder 

5 1/2 yds lace 1 pen holder 
26 1/4 yds colored cambric 46 lead pencils 

6 doz buttons 

1 vest pattern Store Supplies 

4 bunches whalebone 

7 yds calico 1 box 

22 yds swiss 1 pr counter scales 

2 yds linen 1 show case 
1 doz buttons 

edging Unknown 

3/4 doz buttons 

19 yds shirting calico 1 bro (??) 

16 yds edging 14 musk[?] bags 

7 3/4 yds black cotton 

8 1/2 yds black cambric 

6 yds gingham 

5 doz buttons 
1 yd calico 

1 vest pattern 

Hardware 

1 lot salt petre 
1 lot fire works 
10 roman candles 

1 shoe cutter 

8 lb Venetian red 

7 1/4 lbs shot 

Books and Supplies 

4 slate pencils 

8 lead pencils 

3 quires paper 

6 pen holders 

2 lead pencils 
2 lot pens 

2 slate pencils 
2 gross pens 
2 pen holders 
12 lead pencils 
2 pen holders 
1 lead pencil 
6 lead pencils 
1 lead pencil 
1 lot slate pencils 
22 lead pencils 



87 



INVENTORY of JOSEPH T. GRANTHAM, dec'd 

Jefferson County 

1853 



Food and containers 

4 Barrels Brown sugar 637 1/2 nett 5 1/2 
22 lbs. Pepper 12c 

6 1/4 lbs. Allspice 16c 
324 lbs. Coffee 9 3/8 

1 Barrel Brown sugar 194 1/2 lbs. 6 3/4 

4 1/2 doz. Extract Coffee 1.00 

19 d. Tea 80c 

145 lbs. crushed sugar 9c 

72 1/2 lbs. Loaf sugar 9 l/4c 

3 oz. nutmegs 7 1/2 

62 1/2 Tobacco 16 

3/4 lb mace 112 1/2 

3 1/4 Ground Ginger 8c 

1 lot molasses Barrels 2.50 
1 Lot fine Salt 75 

4 R. Ginger 10 

1 3/4 cloves 37 1/2 
3/4 Boxes Pipes 1.00 
24 lb. Tobacco 33 
1/4 lb. Cinnamon 35 
Tobacco 25 

7 Sacks G.A. Salt 1.12 1/2 

Housewares 

4 Setts Teaspoons 

2 Sett Tablespoons 29 

5 jugs 12 1/2 

1 lot of Tubs 

2 wooden Buckets 
5 stone Jugs 25c 
4 jars 12 1/2 

3 1/2 pc. candlewick 20c 
3 clay jugs 18 3/4 

2 Doz. Blacking 25 

1 pc. shoe thread 50c 

3 stone jars 25 

1 10/12 Doz. Blk. wadding 5c 

4 painted Buckets 
1 small Tub 25c 

1 -- soap 10 

29 1/4 Salt Petre 9 

2 Dishes 50c 
2 Dishes 60c 



2 Dishes 40c 

1/2 Doz. Bot. 1. oil 3.25 

10 chambers 21.— 

5 pr. Snuffers 1/- 

4 clay chambers 9 

1 pr. Japan Snuffers .50 

1 Gross clothes pins 1.00 

1 1/2 pc Shoe Thread .50 

29 lbs. Venetian Red 5c 

4 washing machines l/9c[?] 
Slate Pencils 25c 

1 Doz. Kurls vermifuge 1.75 
1 Bot. 1. oil 8c 

1 Doz oil spitter[?] 37 1/2 

5 Li therv agen[?] 

2 foot mats .12 1/2 
1/3 Doz. 1. oil 2.00 

7 1/2 Doz. matches 8 1/3 

3 clay jugs 12 1/2 
40 lbs. starch 25c 
2 clay jugs 6c 

1 Lot clay crocks $8.33 
1 Doz. Brooms 56 

1 Coffe Mill .42 

9 papers 8 oz. tacks 8 l/2c 

9 papers 6 oz. Tacks 8c 

5 papers British Lustre 8c 

4 waiters 10 1/2 

2 Tea Canisters 8c 

1 large Tub 75 

3 Bed Cords 25c 

5 Bot. B. oil 3 

2 Tea Kettles 31 

3 paper [tacks?] 8c 

1 Doz. Fiddle strings 37 1/2 
16 papers 4 oz. tacks 2c 

2 Dishes 30c 
mouse traps 10 

2 1/2 Doz. plates 40c 
2 white Dishes 2/20 1/40 

10 sets Teas. 12 1/2 

2 Doz. Plates 45c Blue edged 

1 sett Plates 45c 

2 Dishes 16c 
2 Dishes 10c 
2 Dishes 8 



88 



J.T. Grantham Inventory, 1853 (con't) 



10 Bowls 5c 

2 white Dishes 40c 

11 Tumblers 7 l/2c 

14 Tumblers 8c 

10 Bowls 3 1/2 

2 Wash Bowls & Pitchers 40c 
1 white Dish 30c 

11 Bowls 4c 

1 3/4 camphor 45 

2 Dishes 25c 
2 Dishes 20c 

5 mugs 8c 

2 Dishes 20c 
4 Pitchers 12 1/2 

1 Looking Glass 62 172 

2 setts cups & saucers 1/40 1/20 
1 Dish 16c 

1 Dish 10c Mat Dishes 

1 Looking Glass 311/4 

3 White Dishes 15c 

2 Looking Glasses 50c 
20 cakes square soap 3c 
1 1/4 C. Indigo 1.10 

3 pr. scissors 4- 
36 Fiddle strings 5 
1 white Dish 60c 

6 Pitchers 25 

15 cruets 6 

1 gross soap 92 

Clothing and accessories 

2 pr. side combs 29 

4 pr. suspenders 
1 Brush 18c 

1 pr. Boys Boots 1.45 

3 Umbrella @ 1.00 

4 pr. suspenders @ 12 1/2 
1 Umbrella 50c 

3 Silk Hdkfs. @ 43 

4 pr. Blk. cotton Gloves 12 1/2 
3 Black wool hats 80c 

3 pr. chil. shoes 37 1/2 
1 by uml[?] Hat 37 172 

5 Boxes Hair pins 18c 
3 Silk Hats 2.25 

3 pr. chil. shoes 20 
15 pr. women's shoes 4 



3 Reading combs Pocket 4c 
2 Reading combs Pocket 8 

4 Reading combs 1/2 
19 wooden combs 2 1/2 

2 silk Hats sep[?] 3.00 

4 1/2 pes. curtain Paper 37 1/2 

8 Linen Hdkf. 8c 

3 pr. hose 8 

9 Linen Hdkf. 37 1/2 

3 worked collars 18 34 

4 1/2 B. J. Gloves 8.00 

10 Reading combs 8c 

8 Tooth Brushes 8c 
6 Linen Hdkf. 25 

6 pr. Kid Gloves 25 

1/3 Doz. hair brushes 2.00 

Dry goods and notions 

1 pc. Blk. cassimere 2 3/4 yds. 1.75 
1 pc. black cloth 4 yds. @ 2.50 
1 pc. blue cloth 4 yds. @ 2.00 

1 pc. Fancy cassimere 3 1/2 yds. 75 

2 Gross Buttons 12 1/2 

1 pc. Plain cassimere 2 3/4 1.10 

1 pc. Grey mixed[?] cassimere 3 yds. 1.00 

1 pc. Irish Linen 5 yds. 35 

1 pc. Brown Holland 11 yds. 16 

1 pc. Brown Cotton 6 6 1/4 

1 pc. Bobinett 21 yds. 2c 

1 pc. Lace 8 yds. @ 5 

1/4 col'd sewing silk 6.00 

1 1/2 Doz. spool Boss 45 

9 yds. bobing edge 1/3 

1 white cambric 4 1/2 yds. 18 3/4 

3 Nankeen 12 yds. 10c 

1 pc. swiss edging 14 1/2 yds 18c 
1 pc. white cambric 5 3/4 yds. @ 33c 
22 spool Boss 50 

4 Doz. linen 

7 top 8c 

5 top 3c 

6 yds. Blue satin Riband 6c 

10 gross Agate Buttons 6c 
4 papers pins 5c 

4 Doz. Linen 15c 
26 papers needles 5 
1/4 Darning needles 15c 



89 



J.T. Grantham Inventory, 1853 (con't) 



1 crash 10 3/4 yds. 8 
1 mouslin 2 1/2 yds. 18 3/4c 
1 pc. Bleached cotton 23 yds. 9 1/2 
1 pc. Bleached cotton 28 yds. 10c 
1 pc. Bleached cotton 48 yds. 5 3/4 
1 pc. Bleached cotton 8 yds. 8c 
1 pc. two Ragging 42 yds. 11 
1 pc. heavy 24 1/2 yds. 12 1/2 
1 pc. 7/8 osnaburgh 32 yds. 9 
1 pc. 3/4 Osnaburg 14 3/4 10 
1 pc. cotton flannel 2 yds. 8c 
1 pc. Bleached cotton 15 yds. 7 
1 pc. Bed Ticking 

1 calico 12 1/2 yds. 10c 

4 calico 12 1/2 yds. 10c 

2 calico 18 yds. 9 1/2 
1 Diaper 4 yds. @ 18c 

3 Blankets 3 yds. 75c 

1 Bed Ticking 26 yds. 10c 
1 Table Diaper 18 yds. 18 3/4 

1 Bed Canvass 9 yds. 10c 

8 pes. cotton 245 yds. @ 5 3/4 

2 1/2 wh Sa Riband 8c 

1 pc. cotton 71 3/4 yds. @ 8 
1 pc. Cotton 123 yds. @ 12 
1 pc. check 24 yds. @ 10 
1/4 Thread 1.25 

5 Doz. coat Buttons 

1 1/2 Gross coat Buttons 6c 

10 Doz. coat Buttons 

1 Gross vest Buttons lc 

1 pc. red Flannel 3 yds. @ 16 

1 pc. red Flannel 8 1/4 yds @ 28 

60 cotton Bats 4 

7 3/4 lb. cotton yarn 18c 

23 lb. c. yarn 17c 

1 1/2 oz. sewing silk 50 

part Ball Twist 1.25 

1 pc. white Flannel 21 yds. @ 37 1/2 

1 pc. white Flannel 25 yds. @ 19 

5 1/2 Doz. Buttons 3 
1 1/2 Tapes 25 

7 yds Black [satin Ribandl 4c 
1 lot H. & Eyes 8 
1/2 gross pins 33c 

4 1/2 green [satin Ribandl 6 

9 1/2 yds. crimson satin Riband 6c 

6 yds. Blue satin Riband 6c 



9 yds. white [satin Riband] 2 1/2 
2 pes. cotton 16 1/2 yds. @ 5 1/2 
8 doz. Pearl Buttons 6c 

8 spool white boss 3 
14 c H. & Eyes 2c 

1 Gross vest Buttons 37 1/2 
34 spools col'd boss 40c 

1/2 sewing boss 40c 

Hardware 

17 pd. Rifle Powder 22 

10 mason's lines 5 

2 1/2 Brimstone 6 
12 d[?] Lead 3 1/2 
7c Lead 6c 

5 cords 12 1/2 

1 Dirk 50 

20 Gal Bll. Whale oil 85 

2 Gals. spt. Turpentine 62 1/2 
1 Peg cutter .25c 

10 curry combs 7 l/2c 
1 Shoe Punch 18 3/4c 

3 pr. Traces .75c 

1 Box saloratus 29 lb 8c 

32 1/4 lb. shot 6 lb 62 1/2 lb 

2 pad locks 8c 

1 Hatchet 40 

3 4 prong Forks .50 

2 long hard[?] 50 

2 Boxes 10/12 Glass broken for 3.12 1/2 

2 Boxes 8/10 Glass broken for 2.92 1/2 
198 lbs. nails 3 7/8 

4 Halters 7c 

1/3 Doz. W.W. Brushes 2.25 
1/4 Doz. W.W. Brushes 3.50 
1 gross screws .26 
1 Lot sandpaper 25 
1 penknife 1/- 

3 Pen knives 25c 

11 handsaw files 8 
3/4 Butt hinges .50 
1 chest lock 6 

1/2 Doz. penknives 4.00 

1 gross screws 30c 

1 sett latches 1/- 

1/2 Doz. penknives 1.00 

1 lot screws 10 

3 Han[?] Fish Hooks 18 3/4 



90 



J.T. Grantham Inventory, 1853 (con't) 



Books and supplies 

2 Han Envelopes 

10 Doz. paste boards 3.50 gross 

3 Bottles Ink 29 

3 gr. writing paper 10 

5 papers sand 5c 

10 Quire Letter paper 10c 

3 Indelible Ink 18 3/4 

6 spelling Books 7c 

Store supplies 

1 Lot scales 2.00 

2 measures 37 1/2 

3/4 Ream wrap paper 80c 

1 Lot measures 25 

2 Ream wrap paper .40c 
1 sand box 8c 

Lot scoops &c 1.00 
1 Tea canister .50 

4 Ream wrap paper 62 1/2 



91 



INVENTORY of ISAAC ROSE 

Jefferson County 

1854 



Food and Containers 

4 lbs Prunes 

1 Lot Tea 

2 Bottles Catsup 

3 papers extract coffee 
1 lb Blk Tea 

3 papers Blk Tea 

1 lb Green Tea 

2 Bottle Catsup 

2 papers Blk Tea 
11 lbs Prunes 

1 Paper Blk Tea 

2 Papers Blk Tea 

1 paper extract coffee 

3 Papers extract coffee 
8 papers extract Coffee 
1 Paper Blk Tea 

1 pack F. Crackers 

5 lb Green Tea 

1 molasses Gate 

3 papers, Blk, Tea 
5 Papers Blk Tea 

4 lbs Prunes 

2 papers Tea 

1 Piece Tobacco 
1 Paper Blk Tea 
10 lbs Green Tea 
4 lbs Prunes 

1 Pack F. Crackers 

2 Papers Blk Tea 
4 lbs Prunes 

1 Pack F. Crackers 
4 lbs Prunes 
4 lbs Prunes 
1 Lot Cigars 

1 Paper Blk Tea 

4 lbs Prunes 

13 1/2 lbs Prunes 

5 Packs F. Crackers 
8 papers pepper 

2 Packs F. Crackers 
1 Paper. Blk. Tea 

1 paper Tea 

3 Paper Blk Tea 
1 lb Green Tea 



3 Paper Blk Tea 
12 lb Dates 

4 papers extract Coffee 
4 papers Gum drops 
10 papers pepper 

4 Bunches Cigars 

3 lbs Green Tea 
540 Cigars 

4 Pack F. Crackers 

2 lbs Green Tea 

1 paper extract Coffee 

3 Papers extract Coffee 

1 Rhubarb 

3 papers extract coffee 

2 Cans. Peas 

1 Bottle catsup 
1 Bottle Rasberry 
1 Bottle cherries 
1 Bottle Rasberry 
1 paper tea 
1 Jar Raisins 

1 Whortleberry 

7 Packs F. Crackers 

3 papers extract Coffee 

2 Small Bags suckers 

2 papers pepper 

1 Paper G. Drops 

3 pr Babies suckers 
1 Paper Blk tea 

1 Glass Jar 

1 paper Blk tea 

2 papers Blk tea 
2 papers Blk Tea 

4 papers pepper 
1 lb Green Tea 

1 Paper warts & corn powder 

1 Vial Tooth ache drop 

2 Papers Tea 

1 plug tobacco 

2 papers Blk Tea 
1 paper tea 

1 paper Blk Tea 

1 paper Blk Tea 

1 paper extract Coffee 

1 Can peas 

1 Paper Blk Tea 



92 



I. Rose Inventory, 1854 (con't) 



1 Bottle Goosberies 

10 papers extract Coffee 

1 Paper Blk Tea 

2 plugs tobacco 
1 Plug tobacco 
1 paper tea 

1 Paper Blk Tea 

1 Plug Tobacco 

2 papers Blk Tea 

1 paper xtract Coffee 
1 paper Blk Tea 

1 paper Blk Tea 

2 Boxes Tooth powder 
1 paper Blk Tea 

1 paper Blk Tea 
1 paper Blk Tea 

1 paper Blk Tea 

2 Bottles tooth ache drops 
1 Bot. Corn Drops 

1 paper Blk Tea 
1 paper Blk Tea 
1 Paper Blk Tea 

1 Plug Tobacco 

2 Papers Blk Tea 
2 Papers Blk Tea 
1 paper Blk Tea 

1 paper Blk Tea 
6 papers Blk Tea 

2 plugs tobacco 
2 lb Hyson Tea 
1 Plug tobacco 

1 Bottle Sarsparilla 
1 Paper Blk Tea 
1 Lot Dried Apples 
1 molasses Gate 

1 Lot Cut & Dried Tobacco 

Housewares 

2 doz ????? taper 
1 Comfort 

6 Cakes Soap 
4 Cakes Soap 
1 Comfort 

1 lb R. Soap 

2 Comforts 

1 Boys Comfort 
1 Bunch Feathers 



22 Cakes. S. Soap 
1 Comfort 
1 Lot Towling 

1 Pitcher 

2 lbs Ros? Soap 

1 Comfort 

2 Comforts 

2 Setts Tea Spoons 
2 Bars white soap 

1 Table Cloth 

7 Linen Towels 

2 Table Cloths 
Meadre (madder?) 

1 Comfort 

30 Cakes S. Soap 
32 yds Carpeting 

2 1/2 yds Carpeting 
1 Cake soap 

1 Set Tea spoons 
1 Worsted Comfort 
1 Childs Comfort 
1 Comfort 

1 Comfort 

7 Cake Rosin Soap 

2 yds Carpeting 
10 lb White Soap 
1 Boys Comfort 

1 Market?? Bag 
1 Cake Soap 

3 lb soap 

18 Cakes Soap 

1 Cake soap 

3 White Comfort 
Meadre (madder?) 

2 Comforts 
1 Comfort 
1 Comfort 

1 Cake S.? Soap 

4 Table cloths 
7 Cakes soap 

1 set of spoons 

2 Comforts 

2 Table Cloths 

1 Bar soap 

2 artificial flowers 

1 Mouse Trap 

2 Window Blinds 
1 Comfort 



93 



I. Rose Inventory, 1854 (con't) 



1 Looking Glass 
12 Bars Soap 
Broom 

3 Cakes soap 

12 Diaper Towels 

2 Cakes soap 
1 Comfort 

6 Cakes Soap 

1 Comfort 
8 Comforts 

2 Pictures 

4 Window Curtains 
2 Pictures 

2 Cakes. S. Soap 
1 Lot Homade Soap 
1 sett knives & forks 

5 lb Rosin Soap 

1 Looking Glass Frame 

1 Picture 

1 Picture 

1 picture 

1 picture 

1 Parasol 

1 Comfort 

Clothing and Accessories 

5 Inside Hdkfs 

2 Combs 

1 Coat 

3 Pr Blk Hose 

22 Linen B. Shirts 

2 Linen Hdkf 
1 Accordian 

1 Fur muff 

1 Summer Coat 

3 Inside Hdkfs 

7 oil Dress " Hdkfs 
1 Collar 44 

1 silk Cravat 

1 stock 

1 Boys Hdkf 

1 pr mans socks(?) 

2 coats 
1 vest 

6 Cloth Caps 

1 Pr Ear Rings 
1 pair Blk ???? 



1 Plush Cap 

1 Casent vest 
3 Shirt Collars 

2 Cotton Hdkfs 

1 Blk vest 

2 Pr C. Socks 

3 Cotton Hdkfs 
1 Corded Shirt 
1 Fancy Shirt 
1. B. Pin 

1 Corded shirt 
1 knight Cap 

1 Glazed Cap 

2 White G. Hdkfs 
1 Pr. Ladies Shoes 
1 Bro. Coat 

1 Trunk 2.50, 
Exchange in pants 

2 Blk Hats 
1 Silk Hdkf 

1 pr Red Drawers 

2 pr Hose 

1 pr Blk Hose 

1 Pr pants 

2 worked Collars 
1 Shawl 

1 pr. C. pants 
1 vest 

1 Wool Hat 

2 Stocks 

1 Carpet Bag 

3 Pr shoes 

1 Pr Gaiters 
3 Pr Socks 
1 Pr pants 
1 Worsted Shawl 
1 Fancy B. shirt 

1 Coat 

2 shirt Colars 

2 worked Collars 
1 Tuck Comb 

3 Handkerchiefs 

5 Worsted Caps 
1 pr shoes 

1 Cash Coat 

6 pr Chil. Hose 

1 Linen, B. Shirt. 
1 pr Shoes 



94 



I. Rose Inventory, 1854 (con't) 



1 pr Worsted drawers 

1 neck ribbin 

1 Blk, Dress, Coat 

1 Blue, Silk stock 

3 Pr, worstead drawers 

1 Wool hat 

1 French work Collar 

1 vest 

1 worsted shirt 

2 vests 
ICoat 

1 Frock Coat 
1 Breast pin 

1 Blk Satin vest 

2 Pr stockings 

3 Working shirts 

4 shirt Collars 
1 Pr Blk pants 
1 Inside Hdkf 
1 Pocket Book 

1 Hdkf 

2 Glazed Caps 
8 cotton Hdkf 
1 Breast pin 

1 Pr. Lambs W Drawers 

3 Red Flannel shirts 
1 Cotton shirt 

1 Small Shawl 
1 Cotton Hdkf 
1 Brown Shawl 
1 Cotton Shirt 
1 Worsted Cap 
1 Finger Ring 
1 Walking Stick 
1 Tuck Comb 
1 Cotton Hdkfs 

I silk Hdkf 

II Finger Rings 
1 P?? Hdkf 

1 Pr C. Pants 
1 Pair C. ? 

4 Hdkfs 

1 Ladies Collar " " 
1 Pr Chil Shoes 
1 pr pants & vest 
1 over Coat 
1 Pr Gray Stockings 
1 Silk Hdkf 



2 Silk Stocks 

3 Pr Casinett pants 
1 Worsted Cap 

1 White Hat 
1 Coat 

1 Bro. Shirt 

2 Cotton Hdkf 
1 Blk wool Hat 

1 Pr. Blk. Pants. 
1 Fancy. B. Shirt " 
1 Blk stock 
1 Blue S. Stock 

1 Pr. C. Pants 

2 Breast pins 
1 Comb 

1 Muslin Hdkf 

2 over Coats 
1 Pr Socks 

1 Carpet Bag 

1 Lot. Chil, Hose 

2 pr Babies Socks 
1 pr Pants 

1 Carpet Bag 
1 Worsted Habit 
1 white Hat 
1 pr Drawers 
1 Pr Pants 
muff 
1 vest 

1 Pr Small Shoes 
Red Hat 

2 Small Hdkfs 
1 Large Collar 

1 Childs Hdkf 

2 Blk over Coats 
1 Pr Gloves 

1 worsted vest 1.25 
1 pr Small Socks 
1 Glazed Cap 

3 Linen Hdkfs 

I Blk Coat 

II Pr Gloves 
1 Cloth Cap 

1 Pr Cash Gloves 
1 Pair pantaloons 
1 Pr Shoes 
1 Pr shoes 
1 Trunk 



95 



I. Rose Inventory, 1854 (con't) 



1 pr shoes 
1 Cash vest 
1 Breast Pin 

1 Pr C. Drawers 

2 Pr Gloves 

1 Pr Drawers 

2 Blk, Felt, Hats 

1 Fur muff 

2 pr Gloves 
lHdkf 

1 Cap 

1 pr pants 

1 Pr Pantaloons 

1 Green P. Jackett 

1 Collar 

1 Cap 

1 Coat 

2 Hdkfs 

4 Blk Wool Hat 

1 Hat 

1? Cotton Handkf 

1 over Coat 

4 Linen Coats 

1 pr Shoes 

1 Coat & pants 

1 Finger ring 

1 Brown Hat 

1 Habbit 

7 Breast pins 

1 Cotton Hdkf 
1 Ladies Habit 
4 Shirt Collars 

3 Pr. C Socks 
1 Breast pin 

8 Finger rings 
1 pr Blk pants 
1 pr Ear rings 
1 Cloth Cap 

3 Cotton Hdkfs 
1 Pr worsted mitts 
1 Blk Coat 

1 Pr Pantiloons 

2 pr Gloves 

2 Small Collars 

1 Fancy shirt 

1 vest 

1 vest 

1 Blk. Trunk 



2 Collars 

1 Pr mitts 

Shoes 

1 Fur muff 

1 Green Pea Jackett 

6 Blk Hats 

1 Boys Cap 

1 pr mitts 

Coat & pants 

1 pr Gloves 

1 Llaynd?Cap 

1 Red. F. Shirt 

1 white Hat 

1 shirt 

1 Silk Cravat 

3 Cloth shawls 
1 Green Coat 
ICap 

1 Blk Coat 

2 Inside Hdkfs 
2 Pr Gloves 

1 Small over Coat 

1 Cloth Cap 

1 Hat 

1 pr Gloves 

1 pr Hose 

1 Breast pin 

1 vest 

1 Pr Boots 

1 pr Socks 

1 pair pants 

1 Sack Coat 

2 Shirts 

1 Monkey Jacket 

8 Linen Hdkfs 

1 Cash Coat 

1 Fur Hat 

1 Boys Coat 

1 Pr, Blk, Hose, 

1 pr Gloves 

1 Blue Cloth Coat 

1 Pr. Pants 

1 woolen Shawl 

1 over Coat & vest 

1 silk vest 

1 Blanket shawl 

6 Inside Hdkfs 



96 



I. Rose Inventory, 1854 (con't) 



1 Pr Cas. pants 
12 Pr pants 
Coat & vest 
1 pr Shoes 
1 D. over. Coat 
1 Breast pin 
16 Pr Gloves 

4 Linen Bosom shirts 
1 Cotton Shirt 

1 Blk Dress Coat 

2 Pr C. Gloves 
1 vest 

1 Pr Gloves 

1 Pr Gloves 

1 Pr. Bracelets 

1 Petersham Coat 

1 Silk stock 

1 vest 

1 Pocket Book 

1 woolen shawl 

1 Coat 

1 vest 

lHat 

1 Trunk 

lHdkf 

5 vests 

27 Pr Gloves 

1 Work Collar 

1 Pr Casinett pants 

1 Blk Coat 

1 Straw Hat 

1 pr Silk Gloves 

3 pr Cotton Gloves 
1 Blk Hat 

1 Fur muff 

1 pr woolen mitts 

5 Green P. Jacketts 

1 Pr pants 

1 pr Woolen Socks 

1 Boy's Cap 

1 Pr Braceletts 

1 Cloth Shawl 

10 Silk Stocks 

1 Boys vest 

1 over Coat 

1 pr shoes 

1 Pr Gaiters 

3 shirt Collars 



1 Green Pea Jackett 
1 Pr. Pants 
1 Box Finger Rings 
16 prs stockings 
1 pr kid Gloves 
1 Boys wool hat 

1 over Coat 

2 vests 

3 Blk Sat? vest 
5 pr stockings 

1 Striped Vest 
13 Inside Rd gloves 
1 Breast pin 
1 knight Cap 

1 Pr Suspenders 

2 wool hats 

1 Coton Hdkf 

1 Shawl 

2 over Coats 

3 Inside Hdkfs 
1 Shawl 

1 Short overcoat 

2 Over Coat 

1 morino vest 

52 pr Cotton Hose 

1 coat 

1 coat & vest 

1 plaid vest 

4 Cotton shirts 

1 Vest 

2 Summer vests 
1 Silk Cravat 

1 over Coat 
1 Carpet Bag 
1 Shirt 

1 Linen. B. Shirt 
1 Satinett coat 
1 Buisness? Coat 
1 Silk Stock 
1 Fancy Shirt 
4 over Coat 
1 Trunk 
1 Shirt Collar 
1 Coat 

1 Flannel Shirt 

2 pr Gloves 
1 vest 

1 pr Ear Rings 



97 



I. Rose Inventory, 1854 (con't) 



5 Fans 

1 pr small shoes 

3 pr Gloves 
Pr Small Shoes 
pair mitts 

4 Pr White Hose 
Lot Rings 
Tuck Comb 
vest 

Worsted Cap 
Coat 

2 Inside Hdkfs 

6 Pr Cotton Hose 
White Hat 

2 vests 
scarf 
overcoat 
pr Boots 
Blk Coat 
Collar 
over coat 

3 Cotton Hdkfs 
pr over halls 
pr shoes 
pr over Hawls 
Pea Jacket 
Razor 
satin stock 
umbrella 
pr Woolen Gloves 

3 Inside Hdkf 
Brown Coat 
pr over Halls 
Fancy Box Hair pins 
Breast pin 
Comb & Box 
Pr Socks 
Plush Cap 
pair Cotton Hose " 
vests 
Blk Coat 
Cashamat?? Coat 
pair ear Rings 
Pr Laterwitt?? pants 
Satin Stock 
small Hat 
Pr Boots 
Gray over Coat 



25 shirt collars at 12 1/2 

5 pair Infant Socks 

1 Collar & Cap 

1 Linen B. Shirt 

1 pair C. Stockings 

1 Boy's vest 

1 Blk Hat 

1 Linen B. Shirt 

1 Pr Drawers 

1 Pr over Hauls 

1 Tweed Coat 

5 Worsted Shawls 
20 Pr Blk C. Hose 

6 pr cotton Socks 

2 Silk Hadkf 

3 cotton Hdkfs 
2 Pr Gaiters 

1 Woolen Shawl 
1 Striped Shirt 

1 Madrass Handkerchief 

2 Coats 

1 Cashamat Coat 

2 Breast pins 

5 pr Cotton Hose 

1 Pr kid gloves 

5 Finger Rings 

1 umbrella 

1 Fine Handkerchief 

1 Brest pin 

1 Green Veil 

1 Linen. B. Shirt 

4 Boys suspenders 

2 pr net drawers 

36 pr assorted Col stocks 
1 Fur, muff & Box 
1 Cotton Hdkf 

3 pr Socks 

1 Blk silk Cravat 
10 pr Cotton Hose 
1 Small Satchell 
1 Port money 

1 Pr Stocking 

4 pen knives 

2 Breast pins 
1 Port money 

1 ???? watch chain 
4 pr white C. Hose 
1 misses Shawl 
1 pair Ear Rings 
1 Box B. Ear Rings 
1 Blue silk stock 



98 



I. Rose Inventory, 1854 (con't) 



1 Cloth Cap 

1 Linen Bosom shirt 

15 pr Lead C. Stockings 

1 Corded skirt 

32 pr Stockings 

4 Blk silk stock 

Working shirt 

1 Corded skirt 

1 Cash vest 

4 pr socks 

2 Shirts 

5 pr white Cotton Hose 
1 pr cotton Gloves 
ICoat 

26 Pr Blue Stockings 
1 Coat 

1 Ladies Fur muff 

2 muffs 

1 Fur muff 

1 Coat 

1 Plush Coat 

1 Pr kid Gloves 

2 shirts 

1 Green pea Jacket 

2 Pr yarn Socks 

1 Collar 

2 pr woolen Socks 
1 pr Socks 

1 Pr Casimere pants 

3 pr cotton socks 
Coat, vst, pants & Hdkf 
Collars &??? 

1 pr Suspenders 

2 pr Blk stockings 
1 Linen. B. shirt 

1 pr C. Shoes 

1 Long Shawl 

3 Cloth Caps 

2 Cotton Hdkfs 
lmuff 

1 vest 70 

5 Pr Woolen Socks 

1 Coat 

ICoat 

1 Pr Woolen mitts 

2 pr C hose 
1 over Coat 
Coat & pants 



1 vest 

1 Coat & pants 

1 Coat 

3 pr cotton socks 

1 Coat & pants 

1 Coat to Baker 

1 Coat & pants 

1 Dark Shawl 

1 pr Suspenders 

1 pr Pants 

1 Cas. coat 

2 white Hats 
1 shirt 

1 Worsted Shawl 
1 Pr. Pants unmade 
1 Pr Woollen socks 
1 pr woolen Socks 
1 Breast pin 
1 Cashmere vest 
1 Breast pin 
1 pair pants 

1 umbrella 

2 pr shoes 

1 Inside Hdkf 

2 Silk, stocks 
1 Hand Trunk 
1 Small Coat 

1 Pr Gloves 

1 Hand Trunk 

2 pr Small shoes 

3 pr Socks 
2 Shawls 

4 Boys Hdkfs 

4 Boys Handkerchiefs 

1 working shirt 

1 pr Cash Gloves 

1 pr cotton socks 

1 pr cotton socks 

4 Boys Hdkfs 

1 Vest 

1 pr cotton Socks 

Pr cotton socks 

1 White Hat 

6 standing Collars 

1 Pr Cotton Gloves 

1 Pr Suspenders 

6 Shawls 

1 Blue overcoat 



99 



I. Rose Inventory, 1854 (con't) 



11 Cravats 
1 pr pants 

1 silk stock 

2 Changable Hdkf 
1 Silk Hdkf 

3 Inside Hdkfs 

1 Blk. S. Hat 

2 Finger Rings 

1 pr Small shoes 
10 finger rings 

2 pair shoes 

1 pr yarn Socks 

3 Blk Hdkf 

1 Pr Ladies shoes 

4 Worstead collar 
8 Silk Hdkf 

2 Pr under sleeves 

1 vest 

2 vests 

5 Boys Hdkfs 
2 pr shoes 

2 silk Hdkfs 
7 pr silk Gloves 
1 velvet vest 
1 Collar 
1 pr Gloves 
1 pr Suspenders 
10 finger rings 

1 Shawl 

2 Water P. Coats 

1 pr pantaloons 

2 Pr Woolen Hose 
1 Glazed Cap 

5 prs cotton socks 

1 Boys Cap 

1 vest 

27 Boys Handkfs " at 14 

1 Boys Coat 

1 Plush Cap 

2 pr miss. Hose 

3 under Shirts 

2 pr Silk Gloves 

3 pr Drawers 
2 Gold Rings 

1 pr Socks 

2 pr Socks 

1 Casemere vest 
1 vest 



4 C. Handkfs 
1 Pr Gloves 

1 pr pantaloons 
3 Handkerchiefs 
3 pr C hose 
7 C. Hkfs 
3 Pr Small shoes 
7 pr yarn Socks 

1 Lot Hdkfs 

2 pair shoes 
2 Coats 

1 Pr pants 

2 Silk vests 

1 Casimere Coat 
1 Coat 
1 vest 
1 Scarf 
1 over Coat 
1 Handkerchief 

1 Pr. C. Socks 

5 silk Hdkfs 

13 mens Hdkfs 

2 Hand Trunks 

3 pr Socks 

2 pr socks 

3 Breast pins 

2 over Coats 

3 Boys Hdkfs 
1 vest 

1 Tweed Coat 

1 Hat 

1 Pr moracco shoes 

1 Second Hand vest 

1 Pr Cotton Pants 

1 vest 

1 Pr Casmere pants 

1 Chip? Hat 

1 Tweed Coat 

1 Brown Coat 

1 Casmere Coat 

1 Casmere Coat 

1 Buff vest 

1 Blk Hat 

1 pair pants 

1 Pair pants 

2 Pr Pants 

3 Pr under sleeves 
1 Worked Collar 



100 



I. Rose Inventory, 1854 (con't) 



1 Tweed Coat 

1 Childs Hat 

1 Blue Cloth Cap 

1 Gingam Coat 

pants 

1 Tweed Coat 

1 Tweed Coat 
Coat & pants 

2 straw Hats 
1 Pr Drawers 

1 Second Hand Coat 

1 pr Linen pants 

2 Pr Stockings 
1 Pr pants 

22 Chip Hat 

1 Blk Frock Coat 

2 Pr pants 

3 vests 

7 alapacca Coats 
10 Linen. B. Shirt. 
5 Tweed Coats 

3 pr stockings 
2 pr pants 

1 pair of Pants 
1 Fancy Shirt 
1 Casmere Coat 

4 Cotton Hdkfs 
1 pair of Pants 
1 shirt 

1 Pr over Hawls 
1 Straw Hat 

1 pair of Ear rings 

2 Breast pins 

1 Second Hand 0. Coat 
1 Coat 
1 Pr Pants 

5 Cotton Hdkfs 

1 Breast pin 

2 Linen Brown Shirts 
17 Chip Hats 

1 white vest 

2 Pr Gloves 
1 Pr pants 
Lot of Hats 
4 pr pants 
1. R. shoes 
Green Cloth Coat 
1 Glove stitcher 



1 Coat 

1 vest 

1 Pr pants 

neck ribbon 

1 Pr pants 

1 vest 

vest 60 

1 Flute 

ICoat 

3 Fans 

1 Summer Vest 

1 pr shoes 

1 Blk Coat 

1 Pr Blk Gloves 

2 Pr pants 

1 Finger Ring 

3 Cotton Hdkfs 
1 Gingam Coat 
12 Chip Hat 

1 Breast pin 
1 Pr shoes 

1 Cotton Handkerchief 

2 pr over Hawls 

3 Fancy shirts 

3 Pr Woolen Gloves 
1 Marsailes Vest 
1 Cloth Cap 

1 Blk Silk Hat 

2 Pr Gloves 

1 Brown muslin shirt 
1 pr over Hawls 

3 Finger rings 
1 Marsails vest 

1 Brown C. Shirt 

2 Hats 

1 Pr Shoes 
1 pair pants 
1 Pr over Hawls 
1 Tweed Coat 
30 Pr Pantiloons 
1 Pr pants 

1 Silk hat 

2 Linen Coats 
1 Pr Gloves 8 

3 pr Silk Gloves 
1 Worked Collar 
1 Pair pants 

5 Cotton Hdkfs 



101 



I. Rose Inventory, 1854 (con't) 



2 pr Gloves 
2 Pr Gloves 

13 pr Cotton Hose 
2 pr C. Hose 

1 marsails vest 
1 Dress Coat 
1 Pr Gloves 

1 pr Pants 

2 Coats 

1 Pr Coarse shoes 
1 Brown Cal. shirt 

1 pr pants 

2 Cotton Hdkfs 
1 Pr pants 

1 Blk Frock Coat 
41 Summer Coats 
1 Blk Coat 
1 over Coat 
1 pr Cash Pants 

1 Pr Gloves 

2 Breast pins 

1 Blk Cloth Coat 

1 Blk Dress 

2 pr pants 

1 Pr Cot pants 

1 Fan 

1 Breast pin 

3 Finger rings 

1 pr Cotton pants 

3 Rings 

2 Finger rings 
1 pr overhawls 

1 Corded shirt 

2 Tweed Coats 
1 Breast pin 

1 Fancy shirt 

4 Breast pins 
1 Breast pin 
1 vest 

1 Pr pants 

1 Pr pants 

4 pr pantaloons 

1 Glove stitcher? 

29 Boys vests 

1 Hat 

1 Pr Pants 

1 Casimere Coat 

14 Inside Hdkf 



1 pair shoes 
1 Box Hair pins 
3 F Ring 
1 Tweed Coat 
3 Tweed Coats 

3 Pr specks 

1 Linen Coat 

4 Breast pins 

1 collar 

2 Collars 

1 Blue shirt 

2 worked Collars 
1 Worsted Collar 
1 Pr shoes 

1 Pr shoes 
1 Blk Hat 
30 Collars 
1 Pr Cot Pants 
1 small Coat 
1 Boys Coat 

1 pr pants 

2 pen knifes 

3 Summer Coats 

3 Pr shoes 

1 Cotton Coat 
1 Boys vest 
1 Tweed Coat 
1 Tweed coat 

4 Straw Hats 

5 Boys coats 

4 parasols 
1 Blk fan 

5 alapaca Coats 

1 parasol 

2 Alapacca Coats 
10 Fans 

1 Linen Coat 

1 pr Summer Pants 

23 Coats 

1 vest 

2 Collars 

3 Hats 

1 Leemur?? Coat 

4 Corded shirts 

1 Pr Cotton pants 

1 silk Hat 

4 Tweed Coats 

2 vests 



102 



I. Rose Inventory, 1854 (con't) 



lhat 

1 Tweed Coat 

1 vest 
ICoat 

2 Boys Hats 

3 Hats 

1 white Crepe Shawl 

2 pr Gloves 

2 Worked Collars 

4 Finger rings 

6 Finger Rings 
2 Shawls 

2 pr pants 
2 vests 

I Large Sack Coat 

II Linen B. Shirt 
1 pr pants 
lHdkf 

1 Handkerchief 
1 Blk Hat 

1 vest 

2 pr pants 

1 pr over Hawls 
1 Breast pin 
8 Pr pantiloons 

1 Boys vest 

2 Linen Coats 
1 Straw Hat 

1 Small vest 
10 Straw Hats 

2 Pr Cas Pants 
1 Inside Hdkf 
1 Linen Coat 

28 palm Leaf Hats 
1 Summer Coat 
1 Pr Summer Pants 
1 Pr Cash pants 
1 Blk Silk Hat 
1 Inside Hdkf 

3 Shawls 

1 Second Hand Coat 

4 Fine? Sack Coats 

1 Small Hdkf 

7 Linen Coats 

2 Inside Hdkfs 
1 pr overhawls 
pr pants 

1 Boys Tweed Coat 



1 Tweed Coat 
1 Summer Coat 

3 Linen B. Shirts 
1 Pr Gloves 

1 pr Pantiloons 
1 Silk hat 
1 Collar 
1 Finger Ring 
1 Silk hat 

4 Pr pants 

1 Linen Coat 
1 pr pants 
1 Pr pants 
1 silk Hat 

1 Tweed Coat 

3 pr Gloves 

2 Pr pantiloons 

3 Tweed Coats 
1 Breast pin 

4 vests 

4 pr pants 

1 Breast pin 
1 Blk Coat 
7 Pr pants 
1 Pr Gloves 

1 Hat 

3 Pr shoes 

2 Pr pants 

2 vest 

1 pr pants 

1 vest 

1 Tweed coat 

1 Green Sack Coat 

1 Breast pin 

3 Tweed Coats 

1 Pair Satinett pants 
3 Inside Hdkfs 

1 Pr Cas. pants 

2 Pr Cotton Hose 
1 Blk Dress Coat 
1 Straw Hat 

1 Pr over Hawls 

1 pr Pants 

1 Pr Shoes 

1 Linen Bosom shirt 

1 Pr Shoes 

2 Linen Bosom shirts 
1 Linen Brown shirt 



103 



I. Rose Inventory, 1854 (con't) 



4 Cloth Caps 
1 Blk Hat 

1 Blk Coat 

2 Silk Scarves 

1 Flannel Shirt 
1 Inside Hdkf 
Gloves 

1 Breast Pin 

2 pair Cash Gloves 
4 Cotton Hdkf 

11 Pr Ear rings 
1 Cotton Hdkf 

1 Pr side Combs 

2 pr Gloves 

2 Breast pins 

3 Pr Gloves 

2 Breast pins 
6 Breast pins 
6 cotton Hdkfs 
1 Pr Shoes 

1 Hdkf 

1 Cloth Cap 

1 Pair Shoes 

3 Linen B. Shirts 
1 Hat 

4 Tuck Combs 
1 Pair Shoes 

3 Silk hats 
1 Coat 

1 Pr Cash pants 
3 Breast pins 

2 Satinett Coats 
1 vest 

I Pr Satinett pants 

II Cotton Cravats 
1 vest 

5 Silk Cravats 
1 Coat 

1 Pr pants 
1 Breast pin 
1 Blue Silk vest 

1 pr Gaiters 

2 Shirt Collars 
2 Silk vests 

2 Satinett vests 
1 mourning Collar 
1 Silk Scarf 
1 Pr Ear Rings 



1 Silk Hat 
1 Plush Coat 

1 Satinett Coat 

2 Shirt Collars 

2 Silk vests 
1 pr Pants 
Shirt Collars 

1 Pr Cashmere pants 

1 pair Cash pants 

3 Silk vazeit? 

3 Inside Hdkf 

2 Pr Ear Rings 
ICoat 

2 Shirt Collars 
1 Blue C. Cap 
ICoat 
1 Blk Coat 
1 Pr Ear Rings 
1 Silk Cravat 

4 Finger Rings 

1 Brown Fur Hat 

1 Pen knife 

2 Pr side Combs 
1 White Hat 

1 Razor 
1 Watch chain 
1 Finger ring 
1 Pr Bracelets 
1 Breast pin 

3 Inside Hdkfs 
6 Pr Ear Rings 
1 pr Ear Rings 
1 Hat Damaged 
1 Pr spectickles 
1 Pocket Book 

1 Pr pants 
1 Pr Cotton Pants 
1 Pr. Ear Rings 
1 Linen B. Shirt 
1 Cloth Cap 

1 pr Shoes 

2 Cotton Hdkfs 
1 Pocket Book 

1 Razor strop 

2 pr Ear Rings 
15 pr side Combs 
1 Pr Cash Pants 
1 Tuck Comb 

1 Gray Casinett Coat 
1 Pocket Book 
1 Breast pin 



104 



I. Rose Inventory, 1854 (con't) 



1 pr L.W. Gloves 
1 Watch Chain 
1 Blk Cloth Coat 
28 Linen. B. Shirts 
3 Pr Ear Rings 

1 Brown Coat 

2 Pr Gaiters 

1 Pr kid Gloves 

1 Lot Ear Rings 

3 Breast pins 

7 pair Gloves 

2 Breast Pins 

4 studs 

10 Breast pin 

1 Pr shoes 

2 pr small Shoes 

1 Pr Gloves 

2 Pr shoes 

1 Pr Gloves 

1 Pr Gaiters & Box 

2 Pr Boots 
1 Blue vest 

6 Breast pins 

5 Linen B shirts 
9 Breast Pins 

1 Ladies skirt 

1 Collar 

2 Cotton Hdkfs 

8 Linen. B. Shirts 
15 Pr Ear Rings 

9 Finger Rings 

1 Blk Satin vest 
4 Cotton Cravats 
1 over Coat 

1 Pr pants 

2 doz Shirt Collars 

3 Breast pins 

3 Linen Bosom Shirts 

1 Pr Gaiters 

1 Pr pants 

1 vest 

1 Blk Coat 

3 Ladies Shirts 

1 Silk Hat 

1 Pair pantaloons 

1 Satin vest 

1 Pr under Sieves 

1 Blk vest 



1 Pr pants 

1 Pen knife 

2 Breast pins 
1 Blk Coat 

1 Boys Cap 

2 Shirt Collars 

1 pr shoes 

2 shirt Collars 
1 Fan 

4 Shirt Collars 

1 Green Pea Jacket 

1 pr Cotton Hose 

16 Inside Hdkfs 

1 Pr pants 

lHat 

1 Pr pants 

3 Silk Cravats 

1 Breast pin 
ICoat 

2 Coats 

1 Pr pants 

5 Pr pants 

4 Shirt Collars 
1 Pr shoes 

1 Silk vest 
1 Cotton Hdkf 

1 Ridicule 

2 Pair pants 

1 Pr pantaloons 

3 pr Silk gloves 

1 Satinett vest 

Dry Goods and Notions 

2 yds Calico 

2 3/4 yds Gingam 

2 spools Boss 

1 yard & Bard Muslin 

1 yd muslin 

7 yds C.V. Ribbon 

3 yds morino 
Wadding & Boss 
Lot of Wadding 
Silk 

1 Remnant Cambric 
1 Card Buttons 
9 1/2 yds Blk Alapaca 
5/8 yd Cambric 



105 



I. Rose Inventory, 1854 (con't) 



2 1/4 yds Cambric 

3 Lots of Buttons 

2 1/2 doz Buttons 

3 yds Velvet ribbon 
Buttons & thread 

20 yds Cambric & Box 

4 3/4 yds Calico 
1 1/2 yds Lace 

4 yds Cashmere 

I Remnant muslin 

II yds Calico 
172 yd Calico 

1 Piece Edging 
3/4 yd Alapaca 

2 skeans silk 

1 yd Irish Linen 

1 yd Bobinett 

3 Green Cambric 

2 yds mull muslin 

7 3/4 yds Bed Ticking 

15 yds Bed Ticking 

4 yds Bleach Cotton 

1 yd Blk Alapaca 

3 1/4 yds alapaca 

2 Remnants silk 

2 yds Linsay 

10 172 yds Calico 

3 yds S. Silk 

1 yd Irish Linen 

4 skeans S. Silk 
6 yds Cambric 

16 yds Alapacca 

2 yds Ginham 

14 1/4 yds Ginham 
2 yds Cambric 
2 yds Drilling 
4 Cards Buttons 

1 yd Drilling 

16 yds Bed Ticking 

2 3/4 yds muslin 

1 1/4 yds Blk Alpaca 
211/2 yds Bleached muslin 
1 Remnant Cotton 

1 Lot Edging 
24 yds Gingam 

8 1/4 yds Plaid Cotton 
30 yds Salicia 

2 1/4 " Bed Ticking 



9 yds Ticking 
Drilling & Cambric 
16 yds muslin 

1 1/2 " Dress silk 
6 yds Col Cambric 
29 yds Furniture Calico 
6 1/2 yds Blue Cotton 

27 1/2 " French Lawn 
1 Remnant Lawn 

34 yds Calico 
4 Hanks Thread 

1 Remnant Lawn 
3 spools cotton 
172 yd Bobinett 
111/2 yds mull muslin 

3 yds Calico 

4 Spools Boss 

8 1/2 yds mouslin 

13 1/2 yds mouslin de lain 

2 3/4 yds muslin 
46 yds Drilling 

3 yds Lawn 

6 yds Jaconett Cambric 

7 spools Boss 

2 yds Alapacca 
6 1/4 " Cambric 

1 Card Buttons 

3 Remnants Cotton 
6 yds drilling 

10 yds Gingham 

2 Cards vest Buttons 
34 yds Bro muslin 

8 1/2 yds Calico 
8 1/2 yds Lawn 
24 Spools Boss 
1000 needles 
1000 needles 

1 doz Spools boss 
1000 S. needles 
18 1/2 yds muslin " 

5 3/4 yds Linen Crash 
10 yds Summer Silk 
111/2 yds. C. Fringe 
10 yds nankeen 

48 spools Boss 
5 Lots spool Boss 

28 yds Muslin 
10 yds nankeen 



106 



I. Rose Inventory, 1854 (con't) 



16 yds trilled cotton 
6 pieces tape 

13 yds Muslin 

2 lots Satin Buttons 

1 lot Whale Bone Buttons 

14 doz Satin Buttons 

8 1/2 yds Cotton Fringe 
72 yds Calico 
1 piece Blk lace 
26 yds Bro. Holland 

5 3/8 yds L. Diaper 
10 yds Calico 

8 7/8 yds L. Diaper 

25 5/8 yds Linen L. Cloth 

16 yds Gingham 

1 1/4 yds Silk 

1 Remnant Calico 

12 yds F Calico 

32 1/2 yds Blue, muslin 

36 Skeans, Blk, silk 

25 1/2 yds Lawn 

16 1/2 yds Lawn 

1 Remnant mouslain 

10 yds Calico 

1 Remnant Lawn 

2 1/4 " Calico 
1250 needles 
10 yds Calico 

1 1/2 doz Spools Boss 
350 needles 
12 yds Eng. morina 
12 1/2 yds Blue Cotton 

1 Card Buttons 

2 Lots Buttons 

6 1/4 yds mouslain 
24 Skeans Blk silk 
1 Lot Calico 

1 Remnant V. Ribbon 

7 1/4 yds Calico 

8 yds Calico 

1 Remnant Calico 

7 yds Calico 

1 Lot Edging 

7 1/8 yds Calico 

23 1/4 " mouslin de laine 

1 Rem Ribbon 

12 yds mouslain 

1 Box Boss 



22 yds Calico 

10 3/4 yds muslin 

1 Remnant Gingham 

2 Rem C. Calico 
10 yds Calico 

1 lot Fancy Buttons 
1 Lot Vest Buttons 
24 doz Buttons 
Buttons & Boss 
20 yds cotton 
20 yds shirting 
10 yds nankeen 

1 doz spools Boss 

10 Bird Eye Lourls" 

2 Hand Buckles 

1 yd Casimer 

2 pair, C.V. Ribbon 

1 ? white G. Boss 

2 Gross Buttons 

1 Card Buttons 

11 1/2 " muslin 
5 1/2 yds cotton 
11 Cards Buttons 
34 3/4 yds muslin 
4 Buckles 

2 Doz Spools Boss 
2 yds Irish linen 

1 card Buttons 
1 card Buttons 
15 cards Buttons 
1 can Buttons 
1 Card Buttons 
1 Doz spools Boss 
1 Doz spools Boss 
1 Doz spools boss 
15 doz spools boss 
1 Doz. spools Boss 
4 1/2 yds table cloth 
1 Buckle 
1 Lot Boss 
1 Boss 

8 doz. spools Boss 
1 Lot tape 

4 1/2 yds Blk Cloth 

5 doz Spools Boss 
142 spools Boss 

1 Lot Skean Boss 
10 yds nankeen 



107 



I. Rose Inventory, 1854 (con't) 



5 1/4 " Irish Linen 
42 yds Cambric 
84 yds Drilling 
1 Lot of remnants 
411/4 yds Lawn 
27 1/4 yds irish Linen 
26 1/4 yds shirting 
4 Cards Vest Buttons 
1 Lot spool Boss 
4 Doz Spools Boss 
1 Lot Buttons 
9 Card Buttons 

15 yds Blk Drilling 
1 yd Blk Lace 

9 yds Bro. Cotton 

9 ??? French Linen 

1 doz spools Boss 

2 1/8 yds Irish Linen 

11 Spools Linen Floss 
34 1/2 yds B. Shirting 

12 1/2 yds Crash 
7 3/4 yd Casimere 
44 1/2 yds Osnaburg 

10 yds, Bed, Ticking 

2 5/8 yds French Linen 

16 ?? Cambrick 
1 Card Buttons 
18 yds Cambric 

4 yds French Linen 

10 doz Buttons 
1 Gross Buttons 

3 3/8 yds French Linen 
1 Lot needles 

9 yds, Blk, Allpacca 
9 yds Calico 
400 needles 
1 yd Bl. Drilling 
1 Dress Patern 

17 yds Blk Calico 
9 yds Calico 

1 Remnant Cambric 

11 1/2 doz Buttons 
1 Remnant Mouslin 
3 3/4 yds muslin 

1 lb Blk Thread 

1 yd Blue cotton 
26 1/4 yds Lawn 

2 Cards Buttons 



1 Remnant Irish Linen 
Thread 

1 lb Blk Thread 

2 1/2 yds velvet 

2 Remnants V. Ribbons 
1 yd Cambric 

1 Remt Ribbon 

2 yds Calico 

12 1/2 yds Ribbon 
1 yd Alapacca 
Lot Boss & thread 
1 Piece Edging 
4 Skeans Silk 

9 yds muslin 

4 yds Gingham 

12 1/2 yds Blk Calico 
1 3/4 yds Gingham 
1 Remnant Lawn 
8 yds Green mouslin 

1 Dress Pat of mouslin 

3 Cards Buttons 

10 yds Gingham 
3 1/2 yds Calico 

5 yds +Bard muslin 
15 1/2 yds muslin 
18 yds Calico 

2 Remnants Calico 

6 1/4 yds Blk Calico 
1 skean silk 

1 Lot of Buttons 

1 Remnant Col. Cambric 

8 1/2 yds mouslain 
Cotton & Buttons 

7 yds Blk V. Ribbon 
a doz Spools Boss 

2 pieces tape 

5 1/2 yds Bw. morino 
1 doz spools Boss 

6 doz Buttons 
20 yds Calico 
6 yds Gingam 

9 yds mouslain 

1 Remnant Furniture Calico 

9 yds Blk Calico 

12 yds Gingham " at 10 

12 yds Bleach drilling 17 2.04 

14 yds Crash 

8 yds mouslain 



108 



I. Rose Inventory, 1854 (con't) 



600 sewing needles 
2 Boxes Buttons 
1 lb Thread 
1 1/2 yds Ribbon 
1 Lot Buttons 
Lot Thread 

1 Remnant yellow calico 

2 Cards Buttons 
50 oz thread 

8 yds Calico 
24 yds Silk 

2 Card Buttons 

1 oz Blk Silk 

12 skeans silk 

2 Remnants linen 
2 Pieces Edging 

1 Remnant Linen 
1 Piece Edging 

1 1/2 yds Gingham 

13 7/8 yds Calico 

14 1/4 yds muslin 

2 1/2 yds mouslains 
13 1/2 yds Calico 

2 spools Boss 

3 skeans S. Silk 

1/2 Card shirt Buttons 
1/4 yds Swiss 

1 doz Buttons 

4 yds Bleached Cotton 
12 yds Calico 

2 yds Calico 

1 3/4 yds Blk silk for 
24 " oil Calico 

2 yds Allpacca 

6 1/2 yds muslin 
32 yds, oil, Calico 

7 1/2 yds Cambric 

6 yds Mouslin 

2 yds Gingham 

3 1/2 " Red Calico 

7 1/2 yds. morino 

5 yds striped Cotton 
1 skein Silk 

1 5/8 yds Blk Silk 

9 yds mouslin delain 

6 3/4 " oil Cloth 

2 yds Blk silk 

1 Remnant Cambric 



3/8 yds cotton 

1 Remnant Muslin 

15 1/2 yds Bleach Cotton 
1 1/2 yds twilled Cotton 
5 yds Ribbon 

Calico & mouslin 

4 Skeans silk 

5 yds Lace 

I yd Calico 

II yds velvet 

5 yds Mouslain 

16 1/2 yds Muslin 
1 Remnant Calico 
1 1/2 yds Gingham 
3/4 yds Irish Linen 

6 yds mouslain 

7 yds alapaca 
1 yds alapaca 
1 Spool Boss 

1/2 yds C. Goods 

4 yds Bobinett 

10 3/4 yds Ribbon 

1 1/2 yds Bleached Cotton 

3 oz. Thread & 2 col spools 

3 Worked strips 

52 1/2 yds Blue cotton 

1 Lot Thread 

5 Cards Buttons 

20 yds Twilled osnenburg 

2 spools Boss 
78 3/4 " Calico 

3 yds Calico 

44 yds mouslind delain 
10 1/2 yds Green Calico 
1 Lot Blk Thread 
3 1/2 yds Blue Cotton 
25 yds Brown Holland 
32 1/4 yds dotted swiss 

6 Remnant Lawn 
14 1/2 " white lace 
13 3/4 yds Cambric 
12 yds check 

23 1/2 yds Curtain Calico 

38 1/2 yds Blk Lace 

10 yds nankeen 

1 Remnant Gingam 

19 3/4 yds Blue Plantation 

10 yds R. Stuff 



109 



I. Rose Inventory, 1854 (con't) 



29 1/2 yds mouslin delain 
13 1/4 yds shirting 
20 174 yds Silk Luster 

1 Remnant Lawn 

2 1/2 yds Cambric 
2 1/4 yds muslin 

1 Remnant Calico 
49 yds Blk Calico 

28 yds Calico 

2 yds Irish Linen 
10 yds Gingam 

1 Remnant Lawn 
8 yds mouslin 

39 1/2 yds muslin 

2 spools silk 

4 Pieces ribbon 

20 yds Cambric 

1 Remnant Irish Linen 

8 3/4 yds Gingam 

1 oz sewing silk 

20 yds Col Cambric 

3 yds muslin 

29 yds Calico 

42 yds mous delain 
6 yds Calico 

4 yds Gingam 

4 1/2 yds ribbon 
20 yds Blue Cotton 
18 yds Calico 

10 yds Cotton 
27 3/4 yds Calico 

5 yds Penitentiary plaid 

1 Lot Thread 

2 Remnants Calico 
1 piece Blk Lace 
12 spools Boss 

5 papers needles 

3 yds Irish Linen 

1 Piece edging 

25 yds mous delain 

2 spools silk 

5 yds Irish Linen 

6 cards Buttons 
2 Pieces Tape 

26 172 yds Cotton 

4 Spools Boss 

24 1/2 yds mous delain 
1 paper needles 



3 yds Calico 

1 paper needles 

2 Pieces Edging 
18 spools Boss 

12 yds Summer Silk 
8 doz Pearl Buttons 
1 Remnant Cotton 

1 Lot Cotton 
8 1/4 yds ribbon 

10 yds Summer Silk 
20 yds Blk Calico 

1 Plain? Bobinett 

1 Pr Bobinett 

38 yds Frgd (fringed?) Bobinett 

1 Piece Frgd(fringed?) Bobinett 

4 yds Cambric 

35 yds Jaconett cambric 

2 spools Boss 

1 Sett Buttons 

7 yds + bard goods 
20 1/2 yds Alapacca 

3 spools silk 

8 papers Buttons 
1 Bunch thread 

1 Lot Buttons 

65 yds Col Cambric 
3 Pieces swiss 

13 1/2 yds Bard goods 
6 Pieces Edging 

2 papers Buttons 

1 Coat Buttons 
16 yds Lace 

2 Dress Paterns 
1 Remnant Lawn 
1 Remnant Lawn 
1 Lot Buttons 

3 Dress paterns 
3 Card Buttons 

3 1/4 yds Calico 
8 yds Muslin 

1 paper Buttons 

33 yds Striped Cotton at 10 

11 yds Cambric 

2 spools Boss 

4 yds Cambric 

1 Remnant muslin 

1 spool silk 

2 papers Buttons 



110 



I. Rose Inventory, 1854 (con't) 



2 Dress paterns 

2 yds Lace 

37 yds Bard good 

5 yds Lawn 

811/4 yds plaid Cotton 

24 yds Blk Calico 

2 Remnants S. muslin 
1000 needles 
Gingham 10 yds 
20 yds Blk Calico 

9 yds Blk Lawn 
14 3/4 yds Calico 

1 pr Buttons 

2 Boxes Bone Buttons 

6 Remnants Lawn 

3 Gross Buttons 

5 yds Calico 

10 Calico 

2 yds Ribbon 

3 3/4 " Irish Linen 
Tape 

1 yd Drilling & Hooks eyes 
41 yds Mouslin 

10 yds mouslin 

2 yds Irish Linen 

3 yds Shirting 
Buttons 

1 1/4 yds Cambric 

6 Spools Boss 

20 3/4 yds twilled Cotton 

16 yds Calico 

Patent Thread 

19 1/2 yds Blk Lawn 

1 yd Gingam 

1 Card Buttons 

3 Paterns of Pants stuff 

34 yds Calico 

111/2 yds mouslain 

3 3/8 yds Cambric 
12 yds Gingam 

1 Patern of Pants stuffs 
1 Spool Boss 
10 yds Irish Linen 
30 1/2 yds Calico 

25 " Mouslin 

10 yds Striped Cotton 

4 yds Pink Gingam 
4 pants paterns 



1 pants pattern for Boy 

9 yds muslin 

16 yds alapacca 

5 yds mous delain 
14 yds Cotton 
12 " Watered Silk 

5 Cards Buttons 
711/4 yds Calico 
1 Box Buttons 

1 lot buttons 

Thread 

1 Card Buttons 

1 Lot Shirt Buttons 

49 " mouslain 

1 Bunch Thread 

26 yds Penitentiary Plaid 

24 yd Gingam 

4 yds Curtain Calico 

I Remnant Silk Braze 

II yds Alapacca 
14 yds Calico 

8 yds Alapacca 
1 Bunch Thread 

20 yds Bleached Drilling 

7 yds morino 

29 yds Penitentiary plaid 

10 yds mouslin 
24 yds mouslain 

17 yds Beraze delain 
33 yds mouslain 

18 yds Calico 

14 1/2 yds mouslain 

6 1/4 yds morino 

46 yds mouslain "at 11 
42 yds Braze 

21 yds Braze 

33 yds mouslindelain 

15 1/2 yds Gingam 

8 yds col Cambric 

12 1/2 yds Blue Cotton 
1 Remnant Silk 
32 yds mouslain 

22 yds Calico 

6 yds Penitentiary 

1 Piece C. Lace 

56 3/4 yds Blue ribbon at 8 

4 Boxes Buttons 

18 yds mouslain 



111 



I. Rose Inventory, 1854 (con't) 



6 yds Silk 

6 1/2 yds mouslain 

8 1/2 yds Alapacca 
33 yds Blk Calico 
33 yds Blk Calico 

27 1/2 yds Gingam 
36 yds Lead Drilling 

18 172 yds Cotton tweed 

18 yds domestic cotton 

9 yds mixed tweed 
13 yds Shirting 

5 3/4 yds Bard tweed 
5 3/4 yds Alapacca 
31 yds Mouslain 

4 yds Drilling 

5 1/2 " Bonnett Ribbon 
64 yds Calico 

39 yds striped shirting 
23 1/4 yds Calico 

19 yds Check 

8 yds + bard goods 
Buttons 

8 doz Silk Buttons 

I Card Buttons 

9 yds Calico 

28 yds Calico 

3 papers needles 

II yds ribbon 

1 Bunch thread 

41 yds Checked goods 

2 doz. S. Buttons 

2 yds Check 

56 yds mouslain 

1 Gross Buttons 

17 3/4 yds mouslian 

3 yds Check 

45 1/4 yds Calico 
9 yds mouslin 

4 yds Swiss muslin 

2 doz Silk Buttons 

20 1/2 yds Plead Cotton 
1 Bunch thread 

1 3/4 yds ribbon 

Buttons 

22 yds Calico 

1 yd Check 

9 yds Cashmere 

7 skeans silk 



1 yd Cambric 

1 Piece Ribbon 

12 3/4 yds Cambric 
4 skeans silk 
3 1/2 Doz spools 
23 yds Check 

3 yds Drilling 

2 Spools Silk 

4 Thimbles 

14 1/2 yds shirting 

Hardware 

1 Lot Buckets 
1 oil Can 
1 Pr Gears 
1 Pr H. Locks 
15?? Shot 

1 pr Blk Irons? 

2 Tin ? 

1 Jack Hammer 

Books and Supplies 

7 Pen holders 

1 Pen Holder 
9 Pen Holders 
Book 

8 quires Paper 

2 pen holders 

1 quire Ruled paper " 

1 Bag Paper 

2 Qr W. Paper 

3 Grahams Magazines at 4 
1 Lot German Books 

1 Frenology Book 

1 Slate 

2 Pen holders 

3 quires W. Paper 

Store Supplies 

7 qr Rapping paper 
1 Store Box 

1 Jar & candy 

3 Bank note reporters 

2 qr wrapping Papers 
1 Table Clock 

1 5$ Broken Bank note 
1 Rail Road Guide 

3 Balls rapping Thread 



112 



I. Rose Inventory, 1854 (con't) 



Box & Bottle 
1 Tape measure 
1 Box 

1 Tobacco knife 
1 Sand Box 
1 Lot Bottles 

1 yd stick 

2 Tin Scoops 
1 Box 

1 Sett Scales & weights 

2 Paste Board Boxes 
1 Pr scissors 

1 Box 

1 show Case 

1 Box & contents 

1 Box, Bilt slides 

1 paste Board Box 

1 Ream Wrapping paper 

3 tin measures 

1 Show Case 

2 Paste Board Boxes 
1 Glass Case 

6 Balls Twine 
Paste Board Box 
1 Hat Box 
1 Lamp & fixtures 
1 Tape measure 
1 Box 

3 Paste Board Boxes 
1 Paste Board Box 

3 Boxes 

1 Basket 

1 Pair scales 

1 Ten plate Stove &c 

1 Box & contents 

1 Bottle 

1 Ring Box 

1 Box 

1 Cloth Brush 

1 sign Frame 

1 Box 

10 Wrapping thread 

1 Box 

3 Bottles 

1 Box 

1 Box 

1 Box 

1 Pr Scissors 



1 Gal measure 
1 Box & Lining 

Personal Effects 

1 Childs Cradle 

1 Common Table 

1 Chicken Box & saw 

6 Chairs 

1 Lot stove pipe 

1 Bedstead & Bedding 

Glass, Tin & China Ware 

1 Crib 

1 8 day Clock 

1 steam Bed Tick 

1 Bed stead 

2 Tables 

1 Bath Tub 

7 pictures 

1 Childs Chide? 

1 Lounge & mattrass 

1 Mattrass 

9 Common chairs 

2 Looking Glass 

1 Wash Stand B & Pitcher 
Trunk & Chest 

1 Cooking Stove & fixtures 

2 Candle sticks 

1 mattrass & quilt 
1 Small Bureau 
1 Rain Bbl 

1 Ten plate stove 
kitchen furniture 

2 mantle Clocks 
5 Chairs 
Bedding 

2 Rocking chairs 

1 mahogany Bookcase 

Unknown 

?eal of matt, Ward 

4 Blk Satu? 

1 Rigalette 

1 Blk Sat? 

4 Steam 

Lot of meun? 

3 Lots S.H. Faulls? 



113 



INVENTORY of DOLPHIN DREW 

Jefferson County 

1856 



Food and Containers 

5 Plugs Toba 
4 lb Pepper 
2 Box Waifers 
54 Plugs Toba 
1 box Pipes 
Tobacco 
Pills & Cards 
smoking Toba 
Ginger 
1 Lot nut megs 

1 Wafers 
Rash Powder 
15 lb Toba 
snuff 

4 lb Candy 
sugar crackers 

2 Lot Pipes 

Housewares 

Biking &c 

1 pair Pitcher 
Bowl 

2 setts K & Forks 
2 salt salvers 

4 pair snuffers 

soap 

4 Box matches 

1 clock 

1 pair curtains 

2 pair snuffers 

2 carving knives 
1 Sugar Box 

3 Brooms 

1 pair scissors 

2 Butter knives 
10 Balls wick &c 
knives & Forks 

1 Table cloth 

2 Forks 
Pitcher 

Waffling Irons 
14 Plates 
Tea kettle 



2 Look Glasses 
1 clock 

3 Candlesticks 

1 shade 

2 Sugar Bowls 
Candlesticks 

2 sugar Bowls 

1 Pan 

2 culenders 
Snuffers 

2 Dishes 
1 Dipper 
1 Tumblers 

1 wash Pan & candle moles 

2 coffee Pots 

2 comforts 

1 coffee Pot 

1 Looking Glass 

1 Pitcher 

1 coffee Pot & Pan 

1 Broom 

Cake Cutters 

9 Tin Cups 

1 Lot spoons 

4 Chambers 

3 carving knives 
knives & Forks 

2 Flower Pots 
scissors &c 

1 Bed Cord 
Epsom Salts 
1 andirons 

1 sett Knives & Forks 

Clothing and Accessories 

3 Handkfs 

5 Hats 

2 shirts 

2 cravats 
suspenders 

3 Bonnet 

1 Straw Hat 

Cravat 

13 Tuck combs 

1 pair Boots 



114 



D. Drew Inventory, 1856 (con't) 



4 night caps 
1 Lot clothes 
7 Pock combs 

1 pair Buck Gloves 
4 pair Drawers 

2 Handkfs 
1 shawl 

1 check shirt 

7 tin combs 
1 Hat 

1 shawl 

Veil 

1 Baby (bonnet?) 

1 pair socks 

1 pair shoes 

1 Bonnet 

3 pr stockings 

3 Hair Brushes 
1 Straw Hat 

1 white Hat 
1 old Coat 
1 pair shoes 
Shaving Brush 

1 Lot Watch Chains 

4 Pock Books 
Razor Paste 

2 Breast Pins 
snuff Box &c 
spectacles 

4 pair side Combs 

1 Lot Shaving Brushes 

3 shirts 

2 pair shoes 
shoe strings 
Silk Cravat 
shoe Thread 
11 pair shoes 
Hair Pins 
shoe Thread 

8 Handkfs 
Box & Gloves 
2 pair Boots 

1 C cravat 
1 umbrella 
1 vest 
1 Lot Pipes 
violin strings 
1 cravat 



Dry Goods and Notions 

10 yds Calico 
12 yds Calico 
10 yds Calico 
10 Calico 
6 yds C. Flannel 
12 Boxes Buttons 

2 1/2 yds Calico 
Box Buttons 

36 mouslain 

12 J. Linen 

5 1/2 selicia 

1 Lot Buttons 

12 1/2 yds Holland 

1 Lot Cotton 

3 pr Ribons 

1 Lot needles 
Bobinett 
1 pr Linen 
1 Box Islets 

4 Bolts Ribon 

1 piece of Linen 

1 box Islets 
silk 

2 lots silk & Thread 
White Cotton 

Boss 

Boss 

2 yds cotton 

55 yds mouslin 

4 yds Cambric 

Boss 

Pants Patern 

shirt Buttons 

1 Hook & eyes 

1 Lot Buttons 

1 Lot Ribbons 

1 Box needles 

1 Lot Buckels 
Buckels 

25 prs Tape 

2 yds Linen 
121 yds Calico 
Buckels 

22 yds Gingham 
Silk & Tape 
Calico 



115 



D. Drew Inventory, 1856 (con't) 



9 yd Ticking 
117 yds Calico 

12 yds Calico 
nankeen 

9 yds Grecianette 
foundation muslin 
15 Bobinett 

Hardware 

4 shoe knives 

2 Files 

3 Pa Tacks 
6 Box Caps 

1 Lot Files 
Lock & key 
spicote 

2 mason Hammers 
axe Helves 
Knobs 

Red Precipitate 
6 whet stones 

13 Pinsers 

1 Lot Gimlets 
Tobacco knife 
1 Bag shot 
1 Lot awls 
Rat Trap 
1 Lock 

3 Tin Buckets 

1 Lot Hinges 
6 Bars Lead 

2 Pad Locks 

1 keg copperas 
Lot Irons 

2 Locks 

2 Pr Powders 
1 Bucket 
Fish Lines 

1 Box Caps 
salt Peter & box 
Camphor 

2 Pa Tacks 
1 augur 

1 Lot screws 

1 Powder Flash 

2 Locks 

2 spicotes 



3 Curry Combs 
1 Latch 

1 Curry Comb 

2 Lots Screws 
1 Pa Tacks 
steel yards 
Salt Peter 

3 cow hides 

1 Lot Fish Hooks 

Augurs 

charcoal 

1 Lot Tacks 

2 small Buckets 

4 pair Locks 
Ring & Lock 

3 Lots screws 
1 oil Can 
Hinges 

1 Lot Hinges 

Books and Supplies 

5 Ink stands 

2 Atlas's 
Pen Holders 

3 qrs Paper 
2 Books 

12 qrs paper 
1 Lot Books 
slate Pencils 
1 Bundle Pencils 

1 Lot Books 

Store Supplies 

Box & Cards 

2 yds sticks 
scales 

Box & Contents 

Box & contents 

Keg 

Box & contents 

1 Ball Twine 

Paste Boards 

1 Box sand 

1 Box & Contents 

Bottle &c 

scoop 



116 



D. Drew Inventory, 1856 (con't) 



1 pair scales 
1 Sand Box 
ICan 
1 qt cup 

Unknown 

3 Pa Land? 
1 Ball Girting? 



117 



INVENTORY of JOSEPH MYERS 

Jefferson County 

1867 



Food and Containers 

1 Bottle C Oil 

2 Bottles Laudenum 

4 Bottles Laudenum 
Dried apples 

1 Plug Tobacco 

5 Bottles W Medicines 

2 Bottles Essence 

1 Bottle Laudenum 

2 Bottles Escence 

1 Bottle C oil 

2 Bottles Lemon 

2 Bottles Medicine 
1 Box coffee Ess 

3 Bottles C oil 

1 Bottle H oil 

3 Boxes crackers 

2 Bottles C oil 
1 Bottle oil 

1 Bot Ess Lemon 

2 Bottles Esc Lemons 
2 Bottles Peppermint 
2 Bottles Laudenum 
2 Bottles C Oil 

2 1/2 lbs C Candy 
2 Bottles Es Lemons 
2 Bottles Peppermint 
2 Bottles Es Lemon 
2 Plugs Tobacco 

6 Plugs Tobacco 

4 Plugs Tobacco 
1 Jar & Pepper 

1 Jar Tartaric Acid 

2 Plugs Tobacco 
4 Plugs Tobacco 

8 Plugs Tobacco 

9 Plugs Tobacco 
6 Plugs Tobacco 

1 Box Tobacco Wt 62 lbs 
4 Sacks G.A. Salt 

12 Plugs Tobacco 
6 Plugs Tobacco 
18 Plugs Tobacco 
4 Plugs Tobacco 

2 Plugs Tobacco 



3 Plugs Tobacco 

1 1/4 Lbs Rappee??? Snuff 
1 Bottle C Oil 

1 Bottle Es Lemon 

2 Plugs Tobacco 
15 Plugs Tobacco 
1/4 Lb Campbor 

1 1/2 Cream Tartar 

2 Plugs Tobacco 

1 Crock & Figs 

2 Plugs Tobacco 
2 Plug Tobacco 
2 Plugs Tobacco 
Mace 

2 Bottles C oil 

1 Paper F Crackers 

2 1/2 lbs Lemon Candy 
1 Bottle bears oil 

1 Bottle Es Lemon 
Bottle sweet oil 
1 Bottle S oil 

Housewares 

1 Wash Board 
1 Cream Jug 

1 Dipper 

2 Fruit Jars 
2 Cakes Soap 

1 Pitcher 

2 Small Tin Cups 
Ge??? Madding 

2 Tin Cups 
1 Molasses Jug 

1 Thunder Mug 

2 Cakes Soap 
Tin pan 

1 Sett cups & Saucers 
1 Sett Cups & Saucers 
1 Sett Table Spoons 
1 Wash board 

4 Jars 

1 Frying Pan 

2 Window Blinds 

1 Cream Jug Stone 

2 Veg Dishes 



118 



J. Myers Inventory, 1867 (con't) 



1 Sett Knives & forks 

2 Shaving soap 
2 Rugs 

2 Tin Pans 

Milk Crock & Thunder Mug 

2 Milk Crocks 

2 Milk Crocks 

2 Blinds 

1 Bowl 

2 Cakes soap 
2 Bowels 

1 Sett White Plates 

2 Tin Pans 
2 Tin Cups 
5 Blinds 

1 Bowl 

2 Milk Crocks 
2 Fruit Jars 

2 Tin Cups 

1 Chamber Bucket 

2 Crocks 

2 Cakes Soap 
2 Pr Scissors 
4 Milk Crocks 

1 Tin Pan 

2 Jars 

2 Fruit Jars 

1 Piece Sponge 
4 Pie Plates 

2 Fruit Jars 
2 Tin Pans 

2 Fruit S Jars 
1 Veg Dish 

1 Sett Stone &c 
4 Comforts 

2 Tumblers 

2 Veg Dishes 
2 White Mugs 
1 Wash Board 
1 Dish 
1 Cream Mug 

1 Wash Board 

2 Fruit Jars 
2 S Knives 

7 Milk crocks 
4 mugs 
2 Cakes soap 
4 Rugs 



1 Cream Jug 
lTub 

2 Setts cup & Saucers 
4 mugs 

1 Earthen bowl 

2 cakes soap 

1 Doz Stone china 
172 Doz B.E. Plates 
1 Knife 

4 Earthen crocks 
1 Bacon Knife 

5 Fruit Jars 

6 Milk crocks 

1 White C Jug 
1 Box G Madding 
1 Jar 

1 White Pitcher 

2 Jugs, 1/2 gal 

1/2 Doz Tin Plates 

2 Mugs 

1 Stone Pan 
4 Fruit Jars 

4 G.P. Rugs??? 

3 Stove(?) Pans 
Plates 

2 Vegetable Dishes 
10 G.P. Box Rugs??? 
8 Tumblers 

1 Sett cups & saucers 

2 Setts cups & saucers 

1 Jug 1/2 gal 

2 Setts Cup & Saucers 
Lot of Plates 

2 Cakes Soap 
2 White Pitchers 
2 Cakes soap 
1 Pr Scissors 
1 Flat Broom 

1 Broom 

2 tin Cups 

1 Wash Board 
1 Sett B E Plates 
1 Bacon Knife 
1 White Dish 
6 Tin Cups 

1 Box G Madding 

2 6 Shaving soap 

1 sett Knives & forks 



119 



J. Myers Inventory, 1867 (con't) 



2 Broad flat Brooms 

4 Box Blacking 
1 Pair Scissors 

1 Frying Pan 
Blacking Brush 

2 box blacking 

1 Molasses Gait 
1 Stone Jar 
1 Hat Rack 

3 Earthen Crocks 
1 Sett Tea Spoons 
3 Vegetable Dishes 
1 White Dish 

1 Pair Scissors 
1 Box G Madding 
1 Frying Pan 
1 Cake soap 

1 Plug Tobacco 

2 cakes C soap 
1 Bacon Knife 
1 Frying Pan 
Bucket and Jar 
1 Box Blacking 

1 Sett B.E.A. Plates 

1 Sett White Tea Plates 

2 Blacking Brushes 

3 Setts B.E. Tea Plates 

5 Starch 

2 Wash Boards 

6 Fruit Jars 
1 Dipper 

4 Cakes Soap 

5 Starch 

1 Starch 

2 Cakes soap 

1 Starch 

2 Cakes soap 

4 Cakes honey soap 
1 Wash Board 
1 Mug 
1 Mug 

3 Bowls 

1 Wash Board 

2 Cakes Soap 

1 Wooden Bowl 
Lampwick 

3 Tin cups 

1 Chamber Bucket 



1 zink board 

1 Water Dipper 

2 Cakes Soap 
1 Bowl 

1 Frying Pan 

1 wash bowl 

2 Cakes soap 

12 Window Blinds 

2 Knives 

1 Sett Plates 

3 Window Blinds 
Chest Lock & Key 
1 Glass Jar 

1 Sett Plates 
1 Fruit Jar 

4 Tin cups 
1 Plates 

4 Cakes Soap 

1 Sett Knives & forks 
4 Cakes Soap 

2 Cakes Soap 
1 Dipper 

Clothing and Accessories 

1 Pr Blk Kid Gloves 

1 Pr Suspenders 

2 Pr Kid Gloves 

1 Pen Knife 

2 Shirts 

1 Straw Hat 
1 Palm hat 
1 Scarf 

1 Pr shoes 

4 Tissue Vails 

2 Pr Blk Hose 
2 Tissue Vails 

2 Pr White Hoes 
1 Pr Buck Gauntlet 

1 Pr Blk Hose 

2 Plaid Shawls 
2 Linen Hdkfs 
1 Pen Knife 

1 Pr Ladies Gauntlets 

1 Pr Gloves 

1 Pr Suspenders 

1 Pr silk Mitts 

2 Linen Hdkfs 



120 



J. Myers Inventory, 1867 (con't) 



1 Crepe shawl 

2 setts cuff & collar 
6 Hdkfs Linen 

1 Pr shoes 

1 Pr Suspenders 

1 Pr shoes 

2 Shoe Brushes 

1 Pr Buck Gauntlet 

1 Pr fine Boots 

1 Pr Buck Gaunts 

1-2 Blades P Knife 

1 Collar 

1 Small Hat 

1 Shawl 

1 Infant Hood 

1 Pr shoes 

1 Pen Knife 

1 Pr Blk Kid Gloves 

2 Tissue Vails 

1 Pr B. S. Gauntlets 

4 Pr Blk Hose 
Comb 

1 Pr Shoes 

1 Tissue Vail 

1 Pr Small Shoes No 4 

1 pr Small Shoes 

5 Pr Gaunts 
1 Tissue Vail 
1 Pr Shoes 

1 Pr Boots 

4 Nett Shirts 

2 Pr Blk Hose 

1 Pr Silk Gloves 
1 Pr S hose 
1 Tissue Vail 

3 Pr Woolen Gloves 
3 Slate pencil 

1 Pr Silk Mitts 

1 Pr Small Hose 

1 Collar 

1 Pr Small Shoes No 1 

1 Pr Black hose 
9 Pr Blk Gloves 
Pocket book 
Jew harps 

2 Pr Blk Gloves 
1 Tissue Vail 

1 Palm fan 



1 pr Small Shoes 

2 Razor Strops 
1 Palm Fan 

1 Pocket Knife 

2 Pr Blk Gloves 

5 Pr Ladies Gaunts 
2 Pr Blk Mitts 

1 pr B & S Gloves 

1 Tissue Vail 

2 Fine Combs 

1 pr Nett Mitts 

2 Pr Ladies Gaunts 

2 Tissue Vails 
1 Pr Mitts 

6 Ladies Collars 
1 Pr Blk Hose 

3 Tissue Vails 

1 Pr Blk Hose 

8 Pocket Knives 

2 Hdkfs 

1 Pr Blk Hose 

2 Pr Suspenders 

1 Knife 

2 Linen Hdkfs 
2 Tissue Vails 

2 Pr Kid Gloves 
1 Pr Blk C Hose 
Side Combs & Box 
1 Tuck Comb 

1 Pr Blk Gloves 
1 Pr Silk Mitts 

3 shoe brushes 
1 Pr Shoes 

1 Pr Shoes 
1 Pr Boots 
3 Hoop Skirts 

1 Pr Boots 
Side Combs 

2 finger rings 

1 Pr Gents Gauntlets 
1 Pair side combs 
1 Hat 

1 Redding Comb 
1 Pr Small Shoes 

1 shaving brush 

2 Pr Blk C Hose 
2 Pr Blk Gloves 
2 Hdkfs 



121 



J. Myers Inventory, 1867 (con't) 



1 Pr Blk Gloves 

2 Linen Hdkfs 

2 Pr White hose 
6 Pen Knives 

2 Pr Kid Gloves 

1 Balmoral Skirt 

3 Pr Shoes 

2 Pr Blk Gloves 

1 Pr Minx Gaiters 

1 Pr Sing? Shoes 

1 Pr Shoes 

1 Pr Shoes 

1 Pr Hose 

1 P Copper T Shoes 

1 Ladies Collar 

1 Pr Blk Hose & Gloves 

1 Pr Small Shoes 

1 Redding? comb 

1 Pen Knife 

1 Bunch Jews harps 

4 Side Combs 

2 Side Combs & box 
1 shirt Bosom 

1 straw hat 

1 pr Ladies Black Gaunts 

4 Pr Shoes 

IComb 

1 Pr Cuffs 

1 Razor Strop 

4 Pr suspenders 
4 Pocket books 

2 Fans 

2 Linen Hdkfs 
2 Hoop skirts 

2 pr Mens Shoes 

4 Pr Shoes 

3 Pr Shoes 

5 Linen Hlfs? 

2 Pocket Knives 

8 Pr Suspenders 

1 Tissue Vail 

1 Fan 

1 Pocket Knife 

1 Palm hat 

1 Pen Knife 

1 Pr Blk C Gloves 

1 Sett Hoops 

2 Pair Ladies W Hoes 



2 Corsetts 

2 Linen Bosoms 

4 Linen Collars 

1 Shaker Bonnett 

Jews harps 

lLHat 

1 Linen bosom 

1 Pr suspenders 

1 Leg horn hat 

4 Side Combs 

1 Pen Knife 

1 Hood? 

8 Side Combs 

1 Pr cotton Gloves 

2 straw hats 
INett 

1 Veil 

Pocket Comb 

1 pr shoes 

1 Razor 

1 Sett Hoops 

1 Pr Childs cuffs 

1 Razor 

1 Tissue Vail 

2 Jews harps 

1 Small Hat 

2 Tissue Vails 
2 Bosoms 

2 Pair Black Hoes 

Jews harps 

1 Bosom 

Garters 

Jews Harps 

6 Cuffs & Collars 

1 Pr Boots 

1 sett children's cuffs 

1 Pr shoes 

2 Pr C Gloves 
1 Razor 

3 Shaving Brushes 
1 Tissue Vail 

1 Redding? Comb 
1 Pocket book 
1 Box P Collars 
1 Pr Ladies Shoes 

1 Pr Shoes 

4 Pr Hose 

2 Plain Hats 



122 



J. Myers Inventory, 1867 (con't) 



1 Pocket comb 

2 Gold rings 
1 Palm fan 

1 Pr Boots 
1 Razor Strop 

1 Pr shoes 

2 Tissue Vails 

1 Pr side combs 
9 Linen Hdkfs 
1 Pen Knife 

1 Tuck Comb 
lHat 

2 Pr S Shoes 

1 straw hat 

2 Tissue Vails 

3 Fiddle string 
1 Shoe Brush 

1 Pr Boots 
1 Sett L Hoops 

1 sett cuff & collar 

2 Pocket combs 
1 Box Collars 

1 Pocket book 

2 Pr Gloves 
1 Pen Knife 

1 Pocket Knife 
1 Corsett 
1 Pr hair Balls? 
1 Pocket Book 
1 Razor 

1 Razor 

2 Shawls 

2 Redding Combs 
1 Pen Knife 

4 D L Hdkfs 
1 Tuck comb 

3 Pen Knives 

1 Pen Knife 

Dry Goods and Notions 

2 1/2 Yds Blk Cloth 

1 Doz Knitting pins 
Lot Tape 

13 1/2 Yds Mouslin 
12 172 Yds Lawn 

2 Bunches red braid 
1 Gross H Buttons 



10 Yds Blk Calico 

21 Yds chale 

2 Gross Buttons 

1 Doz skeins of cotton 

Ruffles 

1 Gross Buttons 

4 Doz Buttons 

Lot Dress Buttons 

Tape & Buttons 

15 yds Bleached Muslin 

Skeins Boss 

1 Card Dress Buttons 

2 Gross Buttons 
2 Yds muslin 

9 Yds Shirting Calico 

24 bunches braid 

25 yds mergantique 
1 Doz Bunches braid 

1 Box Buttons 

34 Yds Calico 

2 Cards H & Eyes 

13 1/2 yds Linsey check 
27 spools Silk 

2 3/4 yds Lawn 

20 1/2 Yds Bleach Muslin 
20 Yds Craip 

15 Yds Mozambique 
24 Yds B C Cambric 

10 1/2 Yds L C Cambric 

9 1/4 Yds Brilliant 

14 Yds Lawn 

32 Yds Mozambique 

26 Yds Lawn 

7 3/4 Yds G Berege 

35 Yds Brown Cambric 

12 1/2 Yds Jaconett 
211/2 Yds Paper Cambric 
1 pin cushing 

10 Yds Brown Paper Cambric 

13 Yds Lawn 

1 Piece Flannel (Red) 

36 Yds Chale 

18 Yds Mozambique 

16 1/4 Yds Lawn 

12 Yds Lawn 

3 Yds Jaconett Cambric 

13 178 Yds Mouslin 

19 1/2 Yds Paper Cambric 



123 



J. Myers Inventory, 1867 (con't) 



24 Yds Mozambique 

52 Yds Brown Lawn 

31 1/2 Yds Lawn 

24 Yds Lawn 

??? Yds Lawn 

11 Yds Chali 

40 Yds Brown Cambric 

9 1/2 yds Blue Man??Gingham 

20 Yds Cambric 

24 Yds Lawn 

35 Yds Mozambique 

48 1/2 Yds Mosell 

50 1/2 Yds Brown Lawn 
11 Yds Vest Paddings 

5 3/4 Yds Berege 

33 Yds mozambique 

21 Yds Brown Berege 

34 Yds Blk Cambric 

20 3/16?? Yds Mozambique 

49 Yds Led Col'd Cambric 

3 Blk Cloth 

35 1/4 Yds Mozambique 

14 Yds Mozambique 

1 Piece Flannel (White) 
20 3/4 Yds Mouslin 

10 yds Shirting Calico 
35 1/2 yds S Calico 
Remnant Calico 

10 3/8 yds Chale 

Lot Braid 

1 Piece Pantaloons stuff 

25 Yds Lawn 

15 yds Lawn 

1 Box fancy S Cotton 

20 1/2 Yds White Flannel 

4 Yds White Flannel 

6 Yds Blue Flannel 
8 Bunches braid??? 
38 Yds Black Silk 

2 Boxes Pins 

1 Doz Knitting Pins 

21 Yds Blk Calico 
1 1/4 yds calico 

1 Gross H Buttons 
18 Skeins Silk 

35 Yds chale 

2 7/8 Yds Brilliant 
20 Yds Mozambique 



10 Yds Swiss Muslin 
42 Skeins Silk 

6 Sheets Wadding 

12 Yds Morrella 

52 Yds Brown Lawn 

7 1/2 Yds Kanton Flannel 

10 3/4 Yds Red Flannel 
9 1/2 Yds Brown Berage 
18 Yds Brilliant 

24 Yds Lawn 

7 3/4 Yds Grey Flannel 

47 Yds Blk Calico 

16 1/2 Yds Yellow chali 

2 Yds White Flannel 

2 Yds Brown Berage 

1 Yd Blue Berage vail 

20 Yds Morrella 

22 1/4 Manchester Gingham 

13 1/2 Yds Blk Drilling 

6 3/8 Yds Paper Cambric 
77 3/4 Yds Chali 
9 Yds Jaconet 

11 Yds alpacca 
1 Box Buttons 

1 Box Pins 
Buttons 

Remnants Calico 
6 Spool Boss 

2 Cards Hooks & Eyes 
2 spools cotton 

Lot Buttons 

6 spool Boss 

2 Cards Buttons 
15 yards calico 

7 1/4 yds W Muslin 

3 Yds Jacinet 

12 yds Lawn 

1 Card Buttons 

2 Gross Buttons 
1 Box Buttons 

1 Doz Skeins Cotton 
22 5/8 Yds Blk Calico 

2 Box Buttons 

1 Card Buttons 

15 7/8 yds Drilling 

2 Bunches Braid 
12 S Cotton 

6 Spools Cotton 



124 



J. Myers Inventory, 1867 (con't) 



2 Paper Pins 
4 Boxes Pins 
Buttons 

2 Doz Buttons 

4 Rows Blk pins 

12 1/2 yds Bl Muslin 
1 Gross Buttons 
1/2 Doz spools Boss 
10 7/8 yds Chali??? 
Lot Buttons 
6 Balls Tape 

5 Braid 

1 Box Buttons 

1 Doz Knitting Pins 

6 Spools Boss 

1 Card Buttons 
18 spools Boss 
Buttons 

3 1/2 Blk calico 
3 Cards Buttons 

2 1/4 yds Blk Cloth?? 
Box & Buttons 

10 yds Cali 

2 Gross Buttons 

6 Spools Boss 
Green Buttons 

12 1/4 yds Mozambique 

7 Boxes pins 

3 Yds plaid casimere 

23 yds Calico 

1 Box Pins & Spool Boss 

2 Box Pins 

1 Bunch braid 
1 Card Buttons 
1 Card Buttons 

24 Yds Chali 
12 yds check 

1 Lot of Braid 
12 yds check 

11 Setts Knitting Pins 

2 Spools Boss 

12 Yds Lawn 

10 1/4 Yds Lawn 
1 Gr of Buttons 

5 3/4 yds Blue Muslin 
1 Box Buttons 

3 yds diaper 

6 spools Boss 



31 1/2 Yds Calico 

6 spools boss 

2 Paper Beads 

2 Bunches S Binding 

2 Cards G Buttons 

1 Box G Buttons 

Box Buttons 

Lot Tape &c 

22 3/4 yds Lawn 

12 Bunches Braid 
1 Lot Buttons 

18 spools cotton 

6 yards White Drilling 

1 Card Buttons 
4 Balls Tape 

2 Spools boss 
10 Yds Lawn 

3 Paper Pins 

2 Gross Buttons 
1 Box pins 
1 D Spools Boss 
Pins & Boss 

1 Lot Buttons 

19 5/8 Yds Plaid Casimere 
6 1/4 B E Diaper 

2 Bunches Red Braid 

3 Box Pins 

13 1/2 yds manchester 
3 Setts Knitting Pins 
2 ?? Buttons 

2 Doz Skeins S Cotton 

3 Bunches Braid 

Hardware 

1 Gentlemans Saddle 
1 small Tub 

1 Paper Finishing Nails 

2 Bridle Bitts 

1 Paper fire cracker 
1 Horse Brush 
1 Small Tub 

1 Bucket 

2 Grith (Girths?) 
lTub 

1 horse brush 

2 Pr Small Hoes 

1 Pr Shovel & Tongs 



125 



J. Myers Inventory, 1867 (con't) 



1 Small Tub 

2 Wooden Buckets 

18 V2 lbs Box E L Wood 
10 Papers Furnishing Nails 
Jar & S Petre 
2 fish lines 

5 Doz fish hooks 

4 Buckets 

1 Paper Brimstone 
1 Bridle Rein 
Fire Crackers 
1 Horse Card 
1 Horse brush 
1 Gents Saddle 
1 Blind Bridle 
1 Horse Brush 

6 Halter strings 
1 Light Halter 

1 Blk Halter 

1 Girth 

2 Blk Brushes 

1 Paper nails 

2 fire Crackers 
1 W. W. Brush 
1 Cow hide 

1 Girth 

1 Gentleman s Saddle 

1 Bridle Bitt 

2 Grith (Girths?) 

3 Buckets 

1 chest Lock 

5 Pr Blk? Tongs & shovel 
1 Pr Tongs & shovel 

3 Paper shoe nails 

1 Paper Finishing nails 
1 Sett Hooks 

1 Cow hide 

2 S Girths 

1 Horse card 

1 Pr Tongs & shovel 

2nd C Nails 

1 Snaffled Bridle bit 

1 Bridle Bitt 

1 Girth 

1 Light B. Rein 

1 Lot all kinds awls 

4 Blind Bridles 

1 Bunch Blk Board 



1 Blk B. Rein 

1 H Halter Rein 
10 oz Chalk 
Jar Salt Peter 

2 Halters 

2 Chest Locks 
1 shoe bush 

3 Lancers 

1 Gentlemans Saddle 
1 Shoe bush??? 
1 shoe Knife 
1 Bridle Rein 
1 Saddle Girth 
1 Lathe W guard 

1 Wooden Bucket 

2 Horse Collars 

1 Blk B Rein 

2 Girths 

1 Blind Bridle 

3 Papers fin Nails 
8 Gum Shellac 

4 Paper F Nails 

8 Papers Furnishing Nails 
1 Bridle Reins 

1 Saddle Girth 

12 Papers Furniture Nails 

2 Papers Furniture Nails 
1 Gross Screws 

1 Bridle Bitt 
1 Pa of Nails 
Paper Rosin 
1 S B Bitt 

3 Water Buckets 
Fire Crackers 
Paper Sulpher 

1 Cow Hide 

Two Papers Finishing Nails 

1 Paper Nails 

2 Horse Brushes 
6 sky Rockets 
Lot Shoe Pegs 

2 Blind Bridles 
1 Blind Bridle 
1 Horse Collar 

3 Cow Hides 

3 Roman Candles 
Lot of Pegs 
1 Haulter 



126 



J. Myers Inventory, 1867 (con't) 



Fire Crackers 
113 1/4 Shot 
1 Wooden Bucket 
1 horse brush 

1 Bucket 

3 Wagon Whips 

2 Gentlemans Saddle 
1 Pack Fire Crackers 

1 4 Prong Fork 

2 Packs Fire Crackers 

4 Sky Rockets 

1 Pair Saddle Reins 

1 S.B. Bitt??? 

1 Saddle Girth 

1 Horse Collar 

1 box fishing hooks 

1 Bunch fishing lines 

1 Saddle Girth 

1 Wooden Bucket 

2 Wooden Buckets 

Books and Supplies 

1 quire Paper 

4 Books 

6 Books 

6 quires Paper 

1 spelling book 

1 Pass book 

1 Comlys S book 

Lot Slate Pencils 

1 Quire Paper 
Fifth Reader 

2 Comly's spelling book 
1/2 Doz pen holders 

1 Pass book 

2 Comlys S Books 
1 Geography 

1 Arithmetic 

6 Books 

Pass book 

1/2 Doz Pen Holders 

1 Arithmetic 

2 Arithmatics 

1 Book 

2 quires Paper 

3 Pen Houlders 
1 Doz L Pencils 



6 Comlys Books 

1 Reader 

Store Supplies 

4 lots Sundries 
17 Ballance 

2 Counter Brushes 
Sundries 
Sundries 

1 Counter Brush 

Box & Contents 

Sundries 

1 Box Sundries 

Sundries 

Unknown 

5 Let??? 

3 A????? 

1 Tulip Masher??? 

1 Steam???? 

5 Cocabs??? 

1 Pr S Princers???? 

1 Pr S Princhers??? 

1 Ladys cloud??? 

10 ?????? 

1 Lemon Stove???? 

1 Bro??? 

3 Skews 

1 Steine 



127 



INVENTORY of THOMAS RAWLINS 

Jefferson County 

1863 



Food and Containers 



Hardware 



Tin spice can 
33 Pepper boxes 
Tobacco box 
Tea chest 
rice? 

Housewares 

andirons 

2 sugar nippers 

11 Stair Rod Slides 
24 carpet slides? 

6 pr Curtain bands? 

4 Waiters 

3 Wooden spoons 
2 clocks 
curtain Rings 
Set Tea spoons 
coal hod 

Bottles D. Cordial 
Tea kettle 

12 Tassels 

Pair curtain pins 

5 mustard spoons 

Clothing and Accessories 

7 slates 

12 Pr side combs 
2 pr skates 

8 Fiddle bridges 
2 Flutes 
Fiddle aprons 

Dry Goods and Notions 

Lot knitting needles 
Thimbles 
Mattress Needles 
128 Hooks & Eyes 
brass buttons 
1 Tailor's scale 

9 knitting Pins 
Lot Eyelets 



9 Lbs. iron bolts 

4 Trowels 

16 Rat tail Files 

5 1/3 Doz. of coat hooks 
door ketches a Doz. 

8 Files 

18 Files 

2 Iron spoke shaves 

Lot of Gouges 

2 Socket Chisels 
16 chisels 
Paint brush 

20 check lines 

4 Key hole saws 

8 1/3 Doz coat hooks 
1 Priming Saw 

9 coat hooks 

34 Window fastenings 

carpenter's Ruler 

12 Gages 

Turning chisels 

B? Knobs 

4 Harness Bitts 

15 Dudgeon boxes 

4 Shutter fastanings 

3 Gouges 

3 pr spring bars 

1 old bit 

Gross sash fastenings 

12 Till Locks 

21 pr Butt hinges 
pair stirrups 

1 carpenter Lock 
Pelham bit 

1 snaffle 

2 Harness bits 
Spalding's Glue 

16 Brass Drawer Locks 
Lot of slides 

43 fish lines 

6 Braking Bitts 

13 Gouges 
9 chisels 

12 brass knobs 



128 



T. Rawlins Inventory, 1863 (con't) 



saddlebag ketches 
5 Brass Hooks 

5 Cooper's compasses 

6 Sash Knobs 
Pair of stirrups 

19 papers finishing nails 

3 saw sets 
Brass nails 

4 pr martingale rings 

4 Brass cupboard fastenings 

5 cupboard fastenings 
Brass Till 

14 Doz. Trunk nails 
L/2 Gross Brass nails 
2 Hand saws 
4 Knob Catchers 
14 Escutcheons 

2 Lignum vita Rubbers 
Lot loose screws 

7 shoe makers irons 

8 Brass sash fastenings 
8 auger bits 

3 cup Locks 

73 mortice Locks 

2 sash fastenings 
23 1/2 escutcheons 

4 small Locks 
13 Shell bits 

7 cupboard Locks 
21 Brass Till Locks 

8 Saws 

3 Saws 

3 Gun screws 

4 Saw sets 

28 Gross screws 
7 awls 

47 Plane bits 
23 pr Jam Hooks 
3 M. Locks 
2 inside locks 

6 White knobs 

5 Bolts 
1 Latch 

6 Brass belts 

1 Mortice Lock 

2 knife sharpeners 
1 Shoemaker's iron 
1 Lock 



2 White knobs 

7 Rim Locks 

4 Mortice locks 
44 Rim Locks 
10 pr Butt hinges 

2 saw sets 

32 saddler's awls 
4 snaffle bits 

3 snaffle 

3 Sets castor 
Sleigh bells 

4 Fawcets 

6 collars 

1 Rim Lock 

3 spades 

1 Drawer Lock 

2 Drawers of screws, hinges &c 
2 carpenter Locks 

4 Bolts 

8 Fawcets 

1 Eagle lock 
Double Gage 

7 lbs Steel 

1 Snaffle & 2 Harness Bits 
2034 lbs bar Iron 

15 doz. picture rings 

2 mould Boards 
Iron Rollers 
Log chains 

1 Punch 

3 curtain fixtures 
wagon tongue 

6 brass hooks 

2 auger bits 
1 Saw 

6 Dung forks 

1 Truck 

Pitch fork 

56 pr Butt hinges 

churn 

750 lbs nails 

1 carver? 

8 New Haven Locks 
churn 

Gun 
sledge 

5 carpenter Locks 

3 lock screws 



129 



T. Rawlins Inventory, 1863 (con't) 



22 wooden spigots 

2 Carpenter Lock latches 

1 Rim Lock 

1 Western (Lock?) 

1 Tonge & Groove bit 
15 Garden hoes 

47 sets shutter hinges 
5 weight? Locks 

2 guns 

5 castors 

10 brass bolts 

4 Jiggling irons 
Venetian red 
Lot of Ohio paint 
Lot of Glue 

13 spring bolts 

5 Gallons copal varnish 

4 brass bolts 
41 ox bolts 

7 boxes Glass 

816 lbs Pots large & small 

2 spring bolts 

5 pr Table hinges 
Lot of Rozin 

Lot of chalk 

2 stiff bits 

3 Doz. brass sash knobs 
1 Gross sash knobs 

1 Snaffle 

2 Harness bits 

3 Harness 

4 brass casters 
Set hinges 
Lot of Flints 

1 1/8 Doz. Carpenter's Pencils 
147 lbs. wagon boxes 

S. whiting. 

6 flush bolts. 
3 hoe handles 

2 sets castors 

3 Pulleys 

18 Picture rings 

Hooks 

5? Escutcheons? 

wagon boxes 

3 Bolts 

12 Pulleys 

20 Bell works 



Doz Pulleys 
13 Plane bits 
2 Doz. roller ends 
6 Paint Brushes 

2 Yard Pumps 
stair rod slides 

3 saddle trees 
110 feet Glass 
12 spring bolts 

Window shade brackets 5 doz. 

3 bolts 

old iron 

6 paint brushes 

Books and Supplies 

Webster's Dictionary 
Lot of Penholders 

Store Supplies 

Scales & weights 

Safe 

Wrapping paper 

case of Drawers 

Desk 

2 Bushel measures 

Extra Wrapping paper 

Paper bags 

Shew case 

measures 

Unknown 

2 crowd sticks 

2pr s? 

15 Elm City 

94 wa? rubber? ? 

2 Rural 



130 



INVENTORY of JAMES JOHNSTON 

Loudoun County 

1854 



Food and Containers 

bottle J.[?] ointment 
8 lb chocolate 

1 Bot. S. Oil 
bottle s. oil 

2 boxes mustard 
bot. S. oil 

1 tea 

2 boxes pills 
bottle s. oil 
2 Bot S. Oil 

4 cakes chocolate 

2 boxes James pills 
10 C. chocolate 
2 tea 

1 spice 

2 lb chocolate 
bottle s. oil 

5 lbs tea 

2 C. chocolate 
[?] tea 
lib tea 
Bot. S. Oil 
bottle B. drops 
2 bottles vermfuge 
2 boxes mustard 
bottle s. oil 
bottle sweet oil 
2 boxes J. pills 
2 bottle salts 
2 snuffboxes 

1 spice 
lib tea 

6 B. pills 

2 Boxes mustard 

1 bottle s. oil 

2 lbs tea 

2 Boxes Mustard 
2 boxes mustard 
2 bottles 

Housewares 

1 Set T. spoons 
1 set T. Spoons 



1 pr Snuffers 
table cover 
3 boxes Blacking 
1 S. blanket 
172 doz Plates 
172 doz Plates 
1 pr shears 
set plates 
3 tea pots 
1 pr shears 

1 B. knife 

2 pitchers 
lot T. spoons 
set K. forks 
1 P. knife 

1 pr sheets 

1 S. bowl 

2 C. soap 

3 sets plates 

4 P. knives 
2 pitchers 
2 Pitchers 
2 s. knives 
2 bowles 

2 dishes 

Box S. Powder 

1 cream 

2 bowls 
blacking 

2 sets cup and saucers 

3 dishes 

2 sets plates 
2 tin pans 

1 pr scissors 

lot knives & forks 

2 brooms 

2 1/4 R. soap 
box tapers 
1 lard lamp 
1 Coffee Mill 

1 tea pot 
6 bowls 

2 dishes 

3 sets Knives & Forks 
set K & forks 



131 



J. Johnston Inventory, 1854 (con't) 



2 boxes blacking 

3 B. Knives 

2 box blacking 
2 box blacking 
blacking 

1 blanket 

2 S. knives 

2 pr. Scissors 

set cup and saucers 

1 pr shears 

5 lb B. soap 

Clothing and Accessories 

2 pr shoes 

1 pr suspenders 

2 silk handkerchief 
1 pr suspenders 

1 pr gloves 

2 hats 

1 shawl 

2 pr boots 

3 pr shoes 
1 pr shoes 
3 F. cap 

6 handkerchiefs 
3 pr shoes 

3 silk handkerchiefs 
10 pr slippers 
1 silk handkerchief 
1 pr gum shoes 
1 handkerchief 
1 trunk 

3 cotton handkerchiefs 
1 handkerchief 

1 pr black gloves 

2 handkerchiefs 
5 combs 

1 pr suspenders 

4 hair caps 
4 combs 

1 pr spectacles 

2 pr shoes 
2 hair caps 
4 caps 
lhat 

1 handkerchief 

2 silk handkerchiefs 



2 pr gloves 

1 silk handkerchief 
pr cotton hose 

2 pr gloves 
6 T. combs 
2 C. combs 

2 handkerchiefs 

1 pr gloves 

2 belts 
2 combs 

1 stock 

2 handkerchiefs 

1 silk handkerchief 

1 handkerchief 

2 handkerchiefs 

1 silk handkerchief 
9 pr shoes 

1 handkerchief 

2 pr combs 
2 collars 

2 handkerchief 
J. Harp & S. Brush 
2 combs 
1 handkerchief 
1 pr gloves 

1 handkerchief 

2 handkerchiefs 

3 pr suspenders 
3 belts 

lhat 

1 silk handkerchief 

2 handkerchiefs 

1 P. book 

2 Leg H. hats 
1 veil 

5 combs 

1 handkerchief 

1 handkerchief 

2 cotton hose 
11 tuck combs 
1 handkerchief 
1 pr shoes 

1 pr gloves 

1 veil 

2 collar 
combs 

1 P. book 

2 F. combs 



132 



J. Johnston Inventory, 1854 (con't) 



2 combs 
2 handkerchiefs 
2 handkerchiefs 
1 P. book 

1 pr suspenders 
7 pr combs 

12 C strings 

2 pr combs 

3 rings 

2 H. caps 

lhat 

23 T. combs 

4 pr side combs 

2 collars 

3 pr shoes 
combs 

3 P. book 

2 pr combs 

1 handkerchief 

1 pr spectacles 

1 silk handkerchief 

1 P. knife 

2 combs 

3 combs 

4 combs 
1 cap 

1 pr shoes 
1 pr socks 
3 veils 

1 black S. cravat 

2 cot handkerchiefs 

3 combs 

2 tuck combs 
1 pr cotton hose 

1 handkerchief 
6 combs 

35 T. combs 

2 handkerchiefs 
1 pr puff combs 

1 pr gloves 

2 pr cotton hose 

3 P. knives 
2 veils 

1 pr slippers 
1 pr suspenders 
1 P. book 

4 handkerchiefs 
1 pr shoes 



1 handkerchief 

2 Y. combs 

1 handkerchief 
1 pr shoes 

1 collar 

2 combs 
9 combs 

1 umbrella 

1 hose 

2 combs 

3 combs 

1 cotton handkerchief 

2 pr combs 
15 combs 

3 combs 

1 handkerchief 

2 pr gloves 
1 shawl 

1 pr suspenders 
lhat 

2 stocks 

1 handkerchief 

4 pr suspenders 

3 combs 

1 silk handkerchief 
3 stocks 
1 hat 

1 handkerchief 

2 combs 

1 handkerchief 

1 handkerchief 

2 handkerchiefs 

3 pr 1/2 hose 

1 pr suspenders 

1 pr hose 

2 P. knife 

2 pr. Spectacles 

3 cotton handkerchiefs 

1 shawl 

3 cotton handkerchiefs 

2 C. combs 
1 shawl 

1 black veil 
1 pr shoes 

3 veils 

1 shawl 
3 Combs 
1 ridicule 



133 



J. Johnston Inventory, 1854 (con't) 



1 handkerchief 
3 P. books 
1 P. book 

1 comb 

5 belts 

2 pr gloves 

6 pr. Suspenders 

3 pr. Cotton gloves 
2 pr gloves 

5 combs 

1 pr boots 

2 P. S. Hats 
2 P boots 

4 P. Hats 

5 S. combs 

1 P. book 

2 combs 
4 rings 

2 P. knives 
1 wool hat 

7 cotton Handkerchiefs 

8 pr shoes 

6 combs 

1 pr shoes 

3 shawls 

1 handkerchief 
1 fur hat 
1 wool hat 

3 Shawls 

1 cotton handkerchief 
1 silk handkerchief 

1 handkerchief 

2 handkerchiefs 

1 shawl 
brush 

2 pr silk gloves 
2 combs 

1 handkerchief 

2 combs 

2 pr suspenders 

2 pr side combs 
1 handkerchief 
1 pr shoes 

4 rings 

1 silk cravet 

3 silk handkerchiefs 

4 T. combs 
1 C. comb 



2 cotton handkerchief 

3 rings 
2 clasps 

1 shawl 

2 pr shoes 

1 fur cap 

2 fur caps 
2 pr gloves 
1 pr boots 

1 handkerchief 

2 pr suspenders 

4 pr combs 

1 pr kid gloves 
4 pr gloves 

3 pr gloves 

1 handkerchief 
1 handkerchief 
1 handkerchief 

1 purse 

2 pr S. combs 

3 rings 

1 pr hose 
1 pr shoes 

1 pr shoes 

Dry Goods and Notions 

4 3/4 yds tweed 

6 1/2 yds black cotton 

5 yds bombazine 

6 yds tweed 

2 yds cord 

1 vest pattern 

2 yds cloth 

10 yds gingham 
14 yds calico 

32 yds brown cotton 
8 3/4 yds alpaca 

13 yds calico 

2 yds cashmere 

3 blue cashmere 
ribbon 

18 1/2 yds calico 

33 yds calico 

3 yds linen drilling 

19 1/4 calico 
1 B. cotton 



134 



J. Johnston Inventory, 1854 (con't) 



2 lots buttons 

2 vest pattern 
belt buckle 

1 vest pattern 
4 1/4 yds drilling 
lot edging 
18 yds gingham 

3 yds kersey 
18 bed ticking 

1 1/2 yds B. lawn 

4 yds dot muslin 
7 1/2 yds linen 

1 linen 

22 yds calico 

4 1/2 yds linen drill 

15 1/2 yds cotton 

10 yds calico 

3 thimbles 

box and buttons 
12 B. boss 
18 yds gingham 
lot thimbles 
6 doz 1 buttons 

2 doz buttons 

3 1/2 yds cashmere 

26 yds brown cotton 
1 1/2 doz buttons 

1 vest pattern 
1 vest pattern 

1 vest pattern 
48 yds edge 

44 yds brown cotton 

2 rolls tape 

1 1/2 yds berage 
lot thimbles 

11 yds gingham 

4 1/4 tweed 
10 1/2 alpaco 
17 yds calico 

35 yds brown cotton 

28 yds calico 

10 yds bombazine 

27 1/2 yds calico 

5 yds berage 

21 vest patterns 

4 yds cambric 
30 3/4 yds calico 
1 vest pattern 



1 vest pattern 

2 vest patterns 

4 1/2 yds cotton drilling 

3 vest patterns 
39 yds calico 

10 yds gingham 

17 yds P. cambric 

10 172 Calico 

11 yds Calico 

36 3/4 yds. Gingham 
3 yds merino 

13 3/4 Merino 

14 yds Lawn 
7 yds alpaca 
52 1/2 calico 

3 yds black cashmere 

15 Gingham 

2 vest patterns 
10 1/2 alpaca 
27 yds calico 

3 yds Tweed 

6 yds L. Drilling 

12 3/4 Gingham 

2 vest patterns 
14 yds lawn 

3 vest patterns 

7 vest patterns 

2 yds blue cloth 
9 yds calico 

3 yds cassimer 

18 yds bagging 
ribbon 

16 yds gingham 
18 yds gingham 
3 blue cassimer 
20 yds bagging 
1 vest pattern 
18 yds calico 

9 1/8 yds ribbon 
3 yds clothe 

27 yds calico 

13 yds bagging 

8 1/4 cassimer 

10 yds calico 

9 yds tweed 
12 yds calico 
30 yds calico 
18 yds calico 



135 



J. Johnston Inventory, 1854 (con't) 



40 yds brolot 
6 1/2 yds merino 
2 yds black cloth 
22 1/2 Calico 
6 yds lining 
6 yds. Calico 
10 yds Calico 
10 yds Lawn 
C. S. silks 
25 1/4 yds Calico 
8 yds calico 

8 yds Berage 

2 doz M. buttons 
vest pat. 

6 yds claico 
1 pa. pins 

3 yds cord 
vest pattern 

6 yds calico 

1 vest pattern 
3 yds casimer 

7 1/2 yds calico 
3 yds cassimer 

9 1/2 yds nankeen 
14 yds cottonade 
lot thread 

1 pa. pins 

9 Calico 

6 3/8 yds gambroon 
14 1/2 yds gingham 

61 3/4 yds calico 

1 pa. pins 

2 1/2 cassimer 

62 3/4 calico 

5 1/2 bombazine 
2 vest pat. 
18 yds mouselain 
Bunch Cotton 

10 yds Calico 
1 pa. pins 

28 yds Gingham 

1 1/4 doz buttons 
28 yds Calico 

2 doz button 
lot buttons 
5 1/4 ribbon 

31 yds Bro. Cotton 

3 1/4 ribbon 



10 1/2 yds bombazine 

11 yds mousseline 

5 3/4 yds M. Memo 

3 yds cassimer 
7 B. S. braids 

6 B. camb. 

18 1/2 yds calico 
1 vest pattern 

1 1/2 yds satin 

7 yds B. cord 

4 S. thread 

12 yds lawn 

3 yds B. lawn 
28 yds bleach 
12 yds bleach 
21 yds plaid 

8 1/2 yds serge 
18 1/2 gingham 

11 3/4 yds velvet ribbon 

2 yds D. muslin 

2 1/2 yds S. muslin 
14 1/2 yds gimp 
28 1/4 yds calico 
buttons 

5 3/4 cottonade 
18 yds calico 

7 1/4 yds ribbon 

ribbon 

7 yds ribbon wire 

18 yds calico 

2 doz buttons 

1 vest pattern 

2 1/2 yds C. green 
111/2 yds ribbon 
2 yds ribbon 

1 1/4 yds brown cloth 
lot edgeing 

17 1/2 yds edge 
7 yds bombazine 

2 3/4 yds cord 
1 B. cotton 

30 3/4 yds brown cotton 
1 3/4 yds lining 

4 cassimer 

1 1/2 yds crepe 

5 3/4 yds linen 

9 1/4 yds berage 



136 



J. Johnston Inventory, 1854 (con't) 



4 yds linen drilling 

7 1/2 yds brown linen 
1 vest pattern 

6 yds Janes 

8 doz buttons 

26 yds brown cotton 

3 yds linen 

3 1/4 yds black velvet 

1 vest pattern 

7 doz buttons 

2 doz buttons 

3 yds blue drill 

3 vest patterns 
1 vest pattern 

1 1/2 Yd. Linsey 

5 buttons 

6 yds tweed 

1 1/2 doz buckles 
5 1/2 Mouselan 
12 1/2 Calico 

21 yds nankeen 
10 1/2 yds drilling 
33 yds janes 

15 yds brown linen 

9 yds Jane 

4 1/2 doz buttons 

22 yds bombazine 
57 doz buttons 
26 yds bleach 

8 yds cottonade 

1 3/4 bombazine 
lot thread 

Hardware 

lock 

2 B. Bits 
2 Gimlets 
Gimlets 

4 S. locks 

2 gimlets 

3 H.J. Files 
2 pad locks 
2 Augers 

1 Bottle Black Varnish 

1 horn 

2 16 blade knives 
2 Augers 



4 Shoe Knives 

1 pad lock 
lot gimlets 

3 pints linseed oil 

5 C. hides 

2 W.W. Brushes 

6 gimlets 

7 Pad Locks 
2 hones 

4 oz camphor 
2 whips 

2 gimlets 
4 latches 

8 glass knobs 

4 bolts 
Hock 
2 locks 

1 b. bit 

2 quarts linseed oil 
Hock 

2 hones 

1 doz P. hinges 

3 hones 

8 set locks 
3 hones 
11 bitts 

2 hones 

2 gallon linseed oil 

3 hones 

2 hones 

3 latches 

2 pad locks 

5 doz buckets 
1 lock 

8 lbs nails 
20 lbs nails 
20 lbs nails 
1 hone 
tin bucket 
tin bucket 

6 hones 

1 keg nails 
1 W. W. brush 
1 pr but hinges 
1 pr pincers 
1 pr pincers 
1 horn 
N. kegs 



137 



J. Johnston Inventory, 1854 (con't) 

4 pr but hinges 

Books and Supplies 

2 slate 
6 Qr. paper 
2 pencils 
2 C. pencils 

1 slate 

2 books 

16 Q. paper 

3 pencils 

2 ink stands 

4 Books 

2 books 
4 pencils 

1 writing paper 

3 pencil 

4 books 

Store Supplies 

box and contents 
box & contents 
lot boxes 
box & contents 

Personal Items 

1 bureau, book case, and contents 

1 eight day clock 

1 bureau, lounge & small stove 

1 pr tables & 1 cupboard 

1 Looking Glass & 2 Waiters 

1 Bed & Bedding 

1 Bureau 

chairs & carpet 

Bed & Bedding 

1 silver watch 

1 Bar shear plow 

1 Single shovel 

House & Lot 4 acres land 

Dwelling House & Lots 

10 Tubs iron hoops 

1 Bbl. Churn 

2 Beds & Bedding 
Bureau 

2 Chairs & Washstand 



1 Bed & Clothes 
Bed Clothes 
House & Lot No. 1 

2 Goats 

1 Horse cart 

1 Barouche 

1 Wagon 

1 Sow & eight pigs 

Sow 

table & lounge 

Stack Hay 

Rack Hay 

Patent Bedstead 

House & Lot No. 2 

1 colt 

pot ovens & kitchen furniture 

chairs 

1 ten plate stove 

lot gear & bridles & shot gun 

2 saddles 
1 stove 

1 cow 
5 fat hogs 



138 



INVENTORY of BENJAMIN D. RATHIE 

Loudoun County 

1859 



Food and Containers 

Part of a Box Segars .45 

1 Box Segars 1.05 

1 Box Segars .50 

4 Sacks Salt @ 1.32 1/2 5.30 

1 Box Segars 1.15 

1 Box Segars 1.00 

1 Lot Pipes .20 

2 Tea Caddies® 11 .22 

12 Bottles Snuff @ 15 1.80 

8 Sacks Salt @ 1.20 9.60 

1 Sack Salt 1.40 

1 Sack Salt 1.40 

1/2 lb. Cloves @ 45 .22 

17 3/4 lb. Rice @ 6 1.06 

3 Papers Chocolate @ 13 .39 
6 Papers Pepper @ 3 .18 

6 Papers pepper @ 2 1/2 .15 

4 Tea Cans @ 75 3.00 
1 Box Raisins .50 

1 Sack Salt 1.32 

I Barrel .30 

12 Papers Pepper @ 2 1/2 .30 
45 Papers Pepper @ 2 1/2 1.12 

II 1/4 lb. Tobacco @ 33 3.71 
1 Demijohn .52 

12 1/4 lb. Tobacco @ 27 3.31 

3 lb. Tobacco @ 26 .78 

40 papers Smoking Tobacco @ 4 1/2 1.80 
38 lb. Tobacco @ 20 7.60 
1/2 lb. Cloves @ 45 .22 

5 old Barrels .30 
1 Keg. 10 

16 Gal. Sweet Wine @ 29 4.64 

1 Keg .37 

30 Gal. French Brandy @ 30 9.00 
25 Gal. Rum @ 25 6.25 

2 Empty Kegs @ 22 .44 

2 Gal. Peach Brandy @ 1.10 2.20 

5 Gal. Rum @ 31 1.55 

1 Molasses Barrel & Contents 2.25 

1 Molasses Gate .28 

1 Barrel & Why 1.75 

28 Gal. Why @ 27 1/2 7/70 

4 Gal. Brandy @ 91 3.64 



34 Gal. Why. @ 26 8.84 

1 Molasses Gate .25 

1 Molasses Barrel & Contents 2.10 

1 Meal Chest 1.50 

39 Bottles® 3 1.17 

1 Why. Barrel & contents .30 

1 Demijohn & Why. .50 

9 lbs. Pepper @ 10 1/2 .94 

7 1/2 lb. Alspice @ 7 .52 

Housewares 

1 Pr. Liverpool Dishes .36 
1 Pr. Liverpool Dishes .32 
1 Pr. Small Dishes .16 

1 Pr. Vegetable Dishes .15 

2 Vinegar Cruits @ 4 .08 
2 Tumblers @ 3 .06 

1 Large Bowl .25 

1 White washbowl & Pitcher .70 

4 Snuffers @ 8 .32 

9 Pocket Bottles @ 4 .36 

1 Pr. Liverpool Dishes .30 

1 Looking Glass .32 

1 Pr. Small Dishes .15 

4 Tumblers @ 8 .32 

1 Large Bowl .26 
7 Stone Plates .52 

2 Glass Cans @ 19 .38 

5 Soup Plates .22 

1 Glass Can .20 

2 Glass Cans @ 40 .80 

6 Tumblers @ 9 .54 

7 Dinner Plates .28 

1 Glass Can .10 

9 Liverpool Plates 42 
4 Stone Plates .20 

2 Glass Cans @ 40 .80 

1 Gravy Bowl & Dish .22 

2 Butcher Knives @ 19 .38 
1--3 Gal. Stone Jar .46 
1--3 Gal. Stone Jar .35 
1--3 Gal. Stone Jar .36 
1--3 Gal. Stone Jar .37 

4 Stone Pans @ 15 .60 
2 Stone Jars @ 18 .36 



139 



B.D. Rathie Inventory, 1859 (con't) 



1 Tin Can & Matches .68 
6 Stone Pans @ 12 1/2 .75 

2 Stone Jars @ 15 .30 
1 Stone Pitcher .15 

1 jar .40 

6 1/2 lb. Starch @ 9 .58 
18 lb. Soap @ 6 1/2 1.17 
1 Candle Box & Mug .08 
ITin Coffee Pot .18 

1 Stone Spittoon .12 

2 Pitchers @ 14 .28 

2 Chambers @ 17 .34 

2 Chambers @ 18 .36 

1 Table Cloth .52 

Cord for Window Curtains .30 

11 Cakes Shaving Soap @ 3 .33 

3 Comfort @ 4 .12 

2 Butcher Knives @ 8 .16 
6 Stone Plates .45 

3 Spoons .16 

1/2 Doz. Spoons .25 
6 Spoons .12 

5 Spoons .14 

1/2 Doz. Knives & Forks 1.05 
1 Butcher Knife .18 
1 Coffee Mill .12 

1 Coffee Mill & Tacks .37 

2 Coffee Mills @ 35 .70 

1 Coffee Mill & Gloves .22 
1 Floor Brush 1.02 

3 Knives @ 12 1/2 .37 
3 Knives @ 19 .57 

3 Knives @ 10 .30 

1 Knife .55 

6 Spoons .15 

2 Comfort @ 3 .06 
2 Mugs @ 5 .10 

5 Plates .32 

2 Large Stone Jars @ 65 1.30 

2 Large Stone Jars @ 40 .80 

1 Lot Paper .10 

2 Sugar bowls® 6 .12 

3 Mugs @ 5 .15 

2 Sugar bowls @ 6 .12 
2 Sugar bowls @ 6 .12 
1 Lot Paper .35 
1 Lot Bordering Paper .45 

12 Rolls Yellow Paper @ 8 .96 



15 Pieces Paper @ 24 3.60 

1 Lot Paper .17 

1 Large Stone Jar .15 

6 Rolls Yellow Paper @ 20 1.20 

8 Rolls Yellow Paper @ 21 1.68 

1 Lot Paper 6 Rolls @ 18 1.08 

2 Rolls Paper @ 15 .30 
1 Lot Paper 1.00 

6 Bowls @ 5 .30 

1 Ten Plate Stove 2.50 

1 Pr. Vegetable Dishes .25 

1 Pr. Vegetable Dishes .25 

1 White Sugar Bowl .25 

1 White Sugar Bowl .33 

1 Cream Cup .12 

1 Pr. Vegetable Dishes .26 

1 Pr. Small Dishes .18 

1 Pr. Glass Pitchers .45 

4 Pitchers @ 17 .68 
1 Pr. Salt Cups .36 

1 Pr. Small Dishes .23 

1 Pr. Small Dishes .30 

1 Liverpool Tea Pot .20 

1 White Tea Pot & Dish .50 

1 Pitcher .16 

Tea Pot & Sugar Bowl @ 22 .44 

1 Liverpool Tea Pot .20 

1 Pr. Pitchers .45 

ITea Pot .11 

1 Sugar Bowl & 2 Mugs @ 6 . 18 
ITea Pot. 12 

Clothing and Accessories 

6 Gingham Hdkfs @ 11 .66 
8 Pr. Cotton Gloves @ 13 1.04 

5 Pr. Kid Skin Gloves @ 40 2.00 
4 Gingham Hdkfs @ 16 .64 

2 Cotton Shawls @ 6 1/4 .12 
4 Small Shawls @ 7 .28 

2 Pr. Shoes @ 80 1.60 

2 Pr. Buck Gloves @ 87 1.74 

1 Pr. Dog Skin Gloves @ 28 2.24 

1 Pr. Buck Gloves .80 

2 Gingham Hdkfs @ 15 .30 

3 Small Shawls .08 

1 Pr. small Boots .40 
1 Pr. Shoes .95 



140 



B.D. Rathie Inventory, 1859 (con't) 



5 Pr. Cotton Gloves @ 10 .50 
1 Pr. small Boots .50 

1 Pr. Shoes 1.05 
1 Pr. Shoes .95 

1 Pr. Fine Shoes 1.10 

2 Pr. Fine Shoes @ 1.20 2.40 

3 Pr. small Boots @ 65 1.95 
2 Pr. small Boots @ 85 1.70 
1 Pr. Shoes .95 

1 Pr. Shoes 1.15 

4 Gingham Hdkf s @ 9 1/2 .38 
l.Pr. Shoes .95 

1 Pr. Boots 1.08 

1 Pr. Home Made 1.05 

7 Gingham Hdkfs @ 15 1.05 

1 Pr. Fine Shoes 1.00 

2 Penknives @ 14 .28 

1 Penknife .45 

2 Port Monies @ 14 .28 

1 Vest .50 

6 Pr. Buck Mitts @ 27 1.62 

2 Penknives @ 13 .26 
1 Penknife .40 
Purses &c .04 

3 Shirt Collars 12 1/2 .37 
Buckles & Purses .12 
Scissors & Toy Pistols .30 
1 Doz. Combs .14 

1 Penknife .42 

6 Pr. Buck Mitts @ 27 1.62 
1 White Shirt .50 

1 Fine Comb .08 

2 Fine Combs @ 14 .28 

7 Pr. Cotton Mitts @ 4 .28 

3 Shirt Collars @ 12 1/2 .37 
7 Pr. Cotton Gloves @ 8 .56 
2 Pr. Boots @ 1.90 3.80 

1 Pr. Boots 1.90 

12 Tuck Combs @ 3 .36 

2 Red Shirts @ 62 1/2 1.25 

4 Combs @ 6 .24 

4 Under Shirts @ 45 1.80 
7 Pr. Boots @ 2.00 14.00 
1 Pr. Cotton Gloves .06 

I Coat .70 

II Pr. White Gloves @ 8 .88 
12 Pr. Side Combs @ 3 .36 
5Pr. Side Combs® 2 .12 



Lot Combs . 10 

6 Pr. Side Combs @ 3 1/2 .21 

5 pr. Blk. Gloves @ 1 .05 

1 Vest .50 

1 Vest .75 

1 Cloth Coat 7.00 

5 pr. Suspenders @ 25 1.25 
12 Pr. Lined Gloves @ 22 2.64 

2 Silk Hkfs @ 40 .80 

10 Pr. Socks @ 8 1/2 .85 

1 Brush & Corset Strings .42 

17 Cotton Hdkfs @ 7 1.19 

18 Packs Playing Cards @ 5 .90 

2 Pr. Socks @ 9 .48[?] 

6 Pr. Socks @ 9 .54 

1 Silk Veil, Mug 7c .33 

3 Pr. Socks @ 10 .30 
3 Pr. Socks @ 11 .33 
1 Vest 1.10 

12 Pr. Side Combs @ 4 .48 
1 Pr. pants 1.25 

1 Pr. White Pants .65 

2 Shirts @ 40 .802 Shirts @ 37 .74 
2 Shirts @ 37 .74 

2 Shirts @ 40 .80 

2 Pr. Boys Pants @ 75 1.50 
1 Pr. Boys Pants .60 

1 Pr. Gloves .12 

3 Pr. Socks @ 18 .54 

4 Prs. Gloves @ 12 .48 

2 Pr. Shoes @ 26 .52 

1 Coat 1.15 

2 Shirts @ 37 .74 
1 Pr. Pants 1.65 
1 Coat .40 

1 Pair Pants 1.75 
1 Sack Coat .55 
1 Coat .50 
1 Roundabout .50 
1 Pr. Pants 2.00 
1 Coat .70 

Dry Goods and Notions 



1 Lot Thread .35 
19 Yds. Bleached Cotton 
14 Yds. Padding @ 3 .42 
1 Lot Thread .32 



10 1.90 



141 



B.D. Rathie Inventory, 1859 (con't) 



1 lot stays, Cord &c .09 

1 Collar & Buttons .16 

8 Yds. Twilled Baging @ 8 172 .68 

1 Yd. Ticking .06 

30 Yds. Canton Flannel @ 7 2.10 

46 1/4 Yds. Ticking @ 9 1/2 4.19 

1 lot Combs & Buttons .10 

12 Spools Cotton @ 4 .48 
1 lot Vest Buttons .06 

1 lot Needles &c .15 
1 Lot Brass Buttons .16 
1 lot Buttons .12 

1 Lot Needles & Tacks .20 
Vest Buttons & Purses .12 

10 7/8 Yds. Alpacca @ 17 1.89 

Silk & Needles .09 

10 Yds. Cotton Jeans @ 18 1.80 

13 1/4 Yds. Cotton Jeans @ 17 2.25 
6 Yds. Tweeds @ 21 1.26 

3 7/8 Yds. Hard Times @ 18 .72 

6 3/4 Yds. Cotton Jeans @ 18 1.25 
12 Spools Cotton @ 4 .48 
12 Spools Cotton @ 3 1/2 .42 
10 1/2 Yds. Tweeds @ 20 2.10 
5 Yds. Sattinet @ 17 .85 
27 Yds. Calico @ 6 1.62 

14 1/4 Yds. Calico @ 7 1/2 1.08 
12 Yds. Calico @ 6 1/4 .75 

2 1/2 Yds. Cotton Drill @ 15 .37 
17 1/2 Yds. Sattinet @ 16 2.80 

4 1/2 Yds. Red Flannel @ 18 .81 
4 1/2 Yds. Fulled Cloth @ 30 1.35 
29 Yds. Calico® 7 1/4 2.13 
Needles & Buttons .16 

1 Lot Thread .09 

4 1/8 Yds. Casinet @ 38 1.57 
1 lot Vest Buttons .09 

1 lot Brass Buttons .25 
1 lot Vest Buttons .22 
1 lot Combs & Buttons .15 
1 Lot Boss .12 

5 Spools Cotton @ 3 1/2 .17 

1 3/4 Yds. Fulled Cloth @ 59 1.04 

1 Lot Tape .37 

44 Yds. Calico @ 5 1/2 2.22 

34 Yds. Calico @ 5 1/2 1.87 



Hardware 

1 -- 2 Horse Wagon & Bed 15.00 

1 Lot Manure 1.05 

1 Horse Bucket .12 

1 Buggy No. 1 75.00 

1 lot old Wheels, Boxes &c .40 

1 low top Wagon 31.50 

2 Saddle Blankets @ 55 1.10 
2 Saddle Blankets @ 52 1.04 
12 Papers Tacks @ 3 1/2 .42 
1 Barouche 18.00 

1 Buggy No. 2 58.00 
1 Cart & Geer 25.00 

1 Fork & Shovel .45 

2 Horse Covers @ 55 1.10 
1 one Horse Sleigh .80 

1 one Horse Wagon 5.00 
7 Bags @ 9 .63 
1 Feed Box 2.40 
Collars &c .12 
1 Water Can .40 
1 Feed Trough 1.00 
1 Lot Manure 3.60 
12 Papers Tacks @ 4 .48 
1 Crowbar 1.00 

1 lot Singletrees .90 

2 Wood Stands .25 
1 Lot Old Iron .35 

3 Lime Boxes & Lime .62 
1 Old Bellows 1.00 

1 Wheelbarrow 2.65 

1 lot Blacksmith's Tools .30 

1 Bucket .35 

1 Lot old Iron 2.00 

1 lot Plank .37 

1 Lot Old Iron .12 

1 Feed Box 1.70 

2259 Shingles @ 32 1/2 7.24 

2 Doors @ 25 .50 

1 Ladder .25 

2 Jacks @ 35 .70 

1 Lot Sand & boards 1.15 

2 1/4 lbs. Madder @ 3 .06 
24 lbs. Saltpetre @ 4 .96 
1 lot Wagon Bows .40 

1 Carriage Tongue 1.75 
1 Harness Box 1.00 



142 



B.D. Rathie Inventory, 1859 (con't) 



3 Whetstones for .06 

3 Shovels @ 40 1.20 

3 Shovels @ 42 1.26 

3 Manure Forks @ 39 1.17 

1 Barrel Frame 1.00 

3 Whips @ 65 1.95 

2 Curry Combs @ 8 .16 

4 Curry Combs @ 7 .28 
2 Curry Combs @ 8 .16 
2 Curry Combs @ 7 .14 
2 Small Brushes @ 8 .16 

2 Carriage Whips @ 50 1.00 

Brushes &c .18 

1 Curry Comb .08 

Harness for two Horses 20.00 

1 Stretcher .25 

12 Papers Tacks @ 5 .60 

1 Lot Awls &c .50 

1 Peg Cutter .20 

2 Small Brushes @ 6 .12 
2 Cards® 8. 16 

2 Gimblets @ 10 .20 
8 Gimblets @ 4 .32 
Single Set Lead Geer 4.25 
Fish Hooks, Combs &c .10 
Fish Hooks, Gun Caps &c .20 
1 Hatchet & Gimblet .35 
Harness for two Horses 15.25 
4 Cards @ 7 .28 

3 Cards® 6 1/2.19 
1 Curry Comb .06 

Harness for one Horse Traces &c 1.10 

Harness for one Horse 1.00 

6 Cowhides @ 7 .42 

Harness for one Horse 1.30 

Pins& Spicket .15 

3 Papers Tacks @ 6 .18 

Augers Chains &c .50 

1 Saddle & Bridle 4.10 

1 Saddle & Martingale 11.50 

2 Old Anvils .50 

1 Rake & Fork .45 
8 Rakes @ 10 .80 

2 Cutting Boxes 2.50 

2 Leather Staps .30 

3 Pad Locks @ 7 .21 

1 Set Single Harness 10.25 
1 Pad Lock .12 



38 Iron Pulleys @ 2 .76 

Single Harness-Minus Traces 6.50 

Books and Supplies 

1 Box Pen Handles .16 

4 Ink Stands @ 4 .16 

Store Supplies 

8 Why Barrels @ 12 172 1.00 

5 Why Barrels @ 16 .80 
1 Pr. Tables 4.00 

9 Old Barrels. 12 

5 Why Barrels @ 20 1.00 

1 Show Case 1.55 

1 Peck Measure .15 

1 lot Funnels .12 

1 Clock 5.00 

1 Pr. Balances 12.00 

1 Pr. Scales & weights 1.30 

1 Coal Stove & Pipe 2.50 

1 Pr. Scales, Lanthern &c .14 

1 Peck Measure & Bucket .25 

2 Half Bushels @ 14 .28 

3- 1/2 Gal. Measures @ 10 .30 
1 Desk .40 

1 Pr. Scales & Weight 1.50 
1 Pr. Scales & Weight .62 

3 Tin Scoops .35 
1 Stove 3.00 

1 Show Case 2.75 
1 Box & Contents .55 
1 Ash Hod .12 
1 Yardstick .09 
1 Glass Jar .26 
1 Tobacco Knife .80 
1 Glass Jar (broke) .06 
1 lot Tin Measures .14 

1 Table .35 

2 Tin Scoops .32 

Personal Items 

1 Looking Glass 1.00 

1 Bureau 8.00 

2 Clothes Baskets 1.00 

1 Bed, Bedstead & Bedding 25.00 



143 



B.D. Rathie Inventory, 1859 (con't) 



1 Rug 3.00 

Carpet on Parlor Floor 10.00 

1 Rocking Chair in Parlor 5.00 

1 Rag Carpet 3.00 

1 Split Bottomed Rocking Chair .75 

3 Pictures .37 

1 Table .50 

1 Looking Glass 1.00 

1 Mantle Ornament .25 

1 Candle Stand 2.50 

1 lot Lumber in Garret .50 

1 Parlor Stove 5.00 

1 Cupboard .50 

Fender, Andirons, Shovel & 

Tongs & Screen 5.00 
China & Glass ware, Dishes &c 2.00 
1 Rag Carpet .25 
1 Candle Stand .50 
1 Bedstead 1.00 
1 Rag Carpet 1.00 
1 Bedstead, Bed & Bedding 15.00 
1 Small Bedstead, Bed & Bedding 5.00 

1 Willow Clothes Basket .50 

3 Pictures .25 

2 Glass Jars .25 

1 Dark Bay Horse 75.00 
1 Black Mare 63.00 

4 Shoats @ 2.50 10.00 
1 lot Dairy ware 5.00 

Carpet & Rods on Stair Steps 1.50 

1 Sorrel Horse 101.00 

1 Piano 24.00 

6 Chairs @ 25 1.50 

1 Wash Bowl, Pitcher & Stand 1.00 

1 Clock 1.00 

1 Looking Glass 1.40 

1 Pr. Andirons 1.00 

1 lot Kitchen Furniture 10.00 

1 George Washington 1.2 

2 Pictures @ 25 .50 

1 Lounge in Passage 1.00 

1 Oil Carpet on Passage Floor 1.50 

1 Sideboard 10.00 

2 Small Waiters on Mantle .25 

1 Carpet on Dining Room Floor 1.00 

2 Stone Spittoons .25 
1 Rocking Chair .50 

1 Carpet 2.00 



1 Desk 5.00 

Unknown 

1 lot old plunder .20 
1 Lot Sundries .12 
Sundries .09 
1 Lot Sundries .30 
1 Lot Sundries .30 
1 Paper Sprigs .27 
1 lot Sundries .35 
4 Cotton Laps[?] @ 3 V2 
1 Lot Sundries .55 



14 



144 



INVENTORY of S. MAHLON NICHOLS, dec'd. 

Loudoun County 

1859 



Food and Containers 

1 Box & Contents 
1/2 lb. Blk Tea 
1/4 lb. Cloves 
1 lb. Allspice 
1/2 lb. Blk Tea 
1 Bot. Castor Oil 

1 oz. Cloves 

2 Bot Sweet Oil (sold sep.) 
1 lb. Allspice 

6 Pipes 

1 lb. Candy 

1 Box & contents 

1/2 lb Snuff 

1 Bot Worm Mixture 

1 Bot. Castor Oil 

1 lb. Ground Ginger 

1 Viol Laudanum 

1 oz. Nutmegs 

1 lb. Tea 

1/2 doz. Pipes 

1 Bot. Embrocation 

2 Cans Mustard 2 
1 lb. Tea 

4 Bot Castor Oil (sold sep.) 

1 Plug Tob 

1 Bot. Cordial 

9 Bottles Pain Killer (sold in 4 lots) 

1 Bot. Tricopherous[?] 

1 Bot Oil Spike 

1 Plug Tob 

1/2 lb. Blk Tea 

1 Viol Pain Killer 

2 Cans Mustard 2 

1 Viol Infant Cordial 
1 Box Mustard 

1 Bot. Embrocation 

2 Boxes Mustard 4 

2 Boxes & 1 Barrel 

3 Flour barrels 
3 Flour barrels 

15 Barrels Corn (sold in 3 lots) 
3 Stacks Hay (sold sep.) 

2 Pepper Boxes (sold sep.) 

3 Boxes & 1 Keg 



3 Boxes 

3 papers Pepper 3 

1 Box Pills 
1/2 lb. Tea 

1/2 lb Rapper Snuff 

2 oz. Cloves 

2 Boxes & 3 Kegs 

2 Boxes & 1 Keg 
1 Box & Contents 
1 Viol Ladanum 

1 Keg Box & Barrel 
1 Viol Cinnamon 
1 Bot Ox marrow 
1 lb. Alspice 

3 papers Ground Pepper 3 

1 Viol Laudanum 

Housewares 

2 cans Mustard 4 
1 Tea Pot 

1 Cake Soap 

1 Dish 

2 Papers Soda 2 

3 oz. Indigo (sold in two lots) 
2 papers Soda 3 

1 Box Tapers 

1 Box Blacking 

2 Papers Soda 3 
1 Cullendar 

1 Picture & Frame 
1 Picture 

1 Picture Frame 

2 papers Soda 2 1/2 
1 Mug 

3 Cakes Soap (sold sep.) 
1 Box Wafers 

1 Cake Soap 
1 Box Wafers 

1 Tea Kettle 

2 Papers Soda 2 

1 Picture & Frame 

18 Yds. Bordering Paper lc 

1 Cabbat?] 

1 pr. Salt cellars 

1 pr. Glass Dishes 



145 



S.M. Nichols Inventory, 1859 (con't) 



2 pr. Scissors (sold sep.) 

7 Pie Plates (sold in 2 lots) 

3 pr. Scissors (sold sep.) 
1 pr. Shears 

1 Pr. Shears 
1 Basket 

8 Cakes Soap (sold sep.) 
1 Tea Pot 

1 Knife 

1 Butcher Knife 

1 Dish 

2 Pr. Plates 4 

5 plates 6 

1/2 doz. Cups & Sausers[sic] 
1 Pitcher 

1 Picture 

2 pr. Snuffers (sold sep.) 
1 Box Tapers 

1 Picture & Frame 

1 Can Powder 

1 Knife 

1 Box Blacking 

1 pr. Scissors 

1 Knife 

1 cake Soap 

1 Sham 

1 Picture & Frame 

1 Knife 

4 Iron Spoons (sold sep.) 

1 Set Spoons 

2 Shams (sold sep.) 

1 pr. Scissors 

2 Cloth Blankets (sold sep.) 
1 Flat 

1 Basket 

6 pr. Scissors (sold sep.) 
1 Coffee Mill 

1 Box Tapers 

4 Papers Soda (sold in 2 lots) 

2 Boxes Wafers 1/2 
1 Bot White Oil 

1 Butcher Knife 

1 comfort 

1 Can Powder 

1 Box Blacking 

13 1/3 lbs Sad Irons 4 172 

1 pr. Snuffers 

1 Tin cup 



1 Comfort 
1 pr. Shears 
1 Knife 
1 Can Powder 
1 Ball Soap 
1 Blk. Teapot 

1 Knife 

2 Box Blacking 4 
2 Pie Plates 3 1/2 

1 Castor 

2 Cakes Soap 2 
2 Cakes Soap 7 
2 Papers Soda 2 
1 Coffee Mill 

1 Can Powder 

2 Papers Soda 2 
1 pr. Pincers 

1 Cake Soap 

1 Cake Pan 

2 Liggots[?] (sold sep.) 

1 Set Knives & Forks 

2 Tin Cups 5 
1 Culendar 

1 Knife 

1 Quart Cup 

1/2 doz. Knives & Forks 

2 Papers Soda 2 
1 Comfort 

1 Mug 
1 Cabbat?] 
1 pr. Snuffers 
1 Tea Pot 
1 Box Tapers 
1 Cake Soap 

Clothing 

3 pr. Hose (sold sep.) 
1 Bonnet Rouche 

1 Scarf 

1 Linen Collar 

4 Blk Silk Hats (sold sep.) 
1 Blk Hat 

1 Fine Comb 
1 pr. Hose 
1 Pr. Socks 
1 Belt 
1 pr. Gloves 



146 



S.M. Nichols Inventory, 1859 (con't) 



1 Viol Philocome 
1 pr. Hose 
1 Bot. Cologne 
1 Blk Hat 
1 Lot Hoops 
1 Violin Bow 

1 Leghorn Hat 

2 pr. Socks (sold sep.) 
1 Leghorn Hat 

4 Straw Hats 
1 Shaving Brush 
1 Gum Overcoat 

1 Stock 

7 " Marbles 

2 pr. Shoes (sold sep.) 
1 pr. Socks 

1 pr. Shoes 

1 Pr. Puff Combs 

1 Blk Satin Vest 

1 Comb 

1 Pr. Combs 

7 Shirt Collars (sold sep.) 

1 pr. Shoes 

2 Rings 

4 Bonnets (sold sep.) 

5 pr. combs 

1 Blk Silk Hat 

1 pr. Berlin Gloves 

1 Straw Hat 

1 pr. Gloves 

1 Pocket Knife 

1 pr. Socks 

1 pr. Berlin Gloves 

3 Cotton Handf s 8 

4 Bonnets (sold sep.) 
1 pr. Gloves 

1/2 doz. Marbles 

1 Bead Reticule 

1 Straw Hat 

1 Blk Hat 

1 Hat 

1 pr. Gloves 

1 pr. Shoes 

1 pr. Puff combs 

1 Pr. Gloves 

1 Bot. Philocome 

1 Box Shaving Cream 

1 Fine Comb 



1 pr. Socks 

1 pr. Gloves 

3 pr. Hose (sold sep.) 

2 Fine Combs 2 172 

1 pr. Home made Socks 
1 pr. Shoes 
1 Viol Cologne 

1 Fine comb 

2 Silk Handf s 62 1/2 
1 Razor Strop 

1 pr. Shoes 

1 Shoe Brush 

2 Straw Hats 4 

3 Straw Hats 2 

2 Straw Hats 2 1/2 

1 pr. Kid Gloves 

2 Boxes Razor Powders 4 1/2 
2 Bun Cup Wire 4 

4 Jews Harps 
1 pr. Gloves 

1 pr. Gloves 
1 Fine Comb 
1 Pr. Shoes 
1 Hat 
1 Purse 

4 Hats (sold sep.) 
1 Chemizette 
6 Bun Braid 
1 Chemizette 

1 pr. Gloves 

2 pr. Socks (sold sep.) 
4 pr. Gloves (sold sep.) 
1 Fine Comb 

1 pr. Gloves 
1 pr. Gloves 
1 pr. Gloves 

3 Bot. Cologne (sold sep.) 
1 Shawl 

1 Satin Vest 

1 pr. Shoes 

2 Fine Combs 5 

2 pr. Gloves (sold sep.) 
lHat 

1 Umbrella 

2 pr. Half Hose (sold sep.) 
1 Watch 

1 Cane 
1 pr. Hose 



147 



S.M. Nichols Inventory, 1859 (con't) 



1 pr. Gloves 

1 pr. Gauntlets 

2 Bun Cup wire 4 

2 Fine Combs (sold sep.) 

1 Viol Cologne 

1 Spectacle Case 

IComb 

1 Comb 

1 pr. Suspenders 

1 Silk Hat 

1 pr. Small Shoes 

1 Hat 

1 Small Hat 

1 Ring 

1 Hat 

2 Port Monnaie (sold sep.) 
1 pr. Gum Shoes 

1 port Monnaie 
1 Port Monnaie 
1 pr. Hose 
1 Pen Knife 
1 Hat 
1 Bot Cologne 

1 pr. Ladies Buck Gloves 

2 pr. Hose (sold sep.) 
1 pr. Socks 

1 Umbrella 
1 pr. Hose 

1 Tuck comb 
4 Jews Harps 

2 Tuck Combs 

6 Reed Pipe Stems 

1 Pocket Knife 

2 Round Combs (sold sep.) 

3 Straw Hats 2 
1 Silk Hand'f 

1 pr. Suspenders 

2 Cravats (sold sep.) 

1 pr. Suspenders 

2 Boxes Shaving Cream (sold sep.) 
2 Straw Hats 3 

1 Cravat 
1 pr. Gum Shoes 
1 pr. Suspenders 
1 Fine comb 
1 pr. Gloves 
1 Pocket Comb 
1 comb 



2 Silk Handkfs 51 
1 Watch Guard 
1 Razor Strop 
1 pr. Puff combs 
1 Horn Comb 
1 Bot Bears Oil 

1 Box Shaving Cream 

2 Bot Cologne 
1 pr. Hose 

1 Bot Cologne 

4 Hats (sold in 2 lots) 
4 Combs 

2 Bot Cologne (sold sep.) 
1 Shoe Brush 

1 Silk Cravat 

2 pr. Homemade Socks (sold sep.) 
2 pr. Gloves (sold sep.) 

1 pr. Hose 

1 pr. Gloves 

1 pr. White Kid Gloves 

1 Port Monnaie 

1 Pocket Book 

1 Bonnet Frill 

1 Bot. Cologne 

1 pr. Shoes 

1 Box of Marbles 

7 Marbles 

1 Silk cravat 

2 pr. Hose (sold sep.) 
1 pr. Hose 

1 Bot. Hair Oil 

1 Bot. Bears Oil 

2 Combs (sold sep.) 

1 Bot Hair Oil 

2 pr. Hose (sold sep.) 
1 fine Comb 

1 Comb 

1 Viol Bears Oil 

2 Watches (sold sep.) 
1 pr. Hose 

1 Pr. Cotton Socks 

22 marbles (sold in 3 lots) 

2 pr. Gloves (sold sep.) 
1 Silk Hand'f 

1 Doz. Marbles (sold in 2 lots) 

2 Shirt fronts (sold sep.) 
1 pr. Gloves 

1 pr. Shoes 



148 



S.M. Nichols Inventory, 1859 (con't) 



1 Bonnet Rouche 
1 pr. Hose & Box 
1 doz. Marbles 
1 Pr. Gloves 
1 comb 

1 pr. Ladies Shoes 
1 Wolenfsic] Cap 
1 Spectacle Case 
1 pr. Shoes 

9 pr. Hose (sold sep.) 
1 Straw Hat 

1 pr. Small Hose 
1 pr. Gloves 

1 Straw Hat 

2 pr. Home made Socks (sold sep.) 
1 Violin Bow 

1 pr. Small Socks 
4 Jews Harps 

1 Tuck Comb 

2 Tuck Combs 5 

3 Buns-Worsted (sold sep.) 

2 Bun Whalebones 2 
1 pr. Mens Stogast?] 
1 pr. Hose 

1 Straw Hat 
1 Viol Cologne 
1 Bot. Cologne 

Dry Goods and Notions 

10 Yds. Blea'd Cotton 13 172 
23 1/4 Yds. janes 17 172 

3 Hanks Thread 1 

1 3/8 Yds. Turkey Satin 54 

3 Yds. Fancy Alpaca 33 
6 3/4 Yds. merino 40 

6 Yds. Janes 17 

12 Yds. Canton Flanel 12 1/2 

2 cards Hooks & Eyes 2 1/2 

11 Yds. Beraise 18 
9 Yds. Merino 31 

9 1/4 Yds. Merino 29 
6 Spools Boss 2 

4 Spools Boss 1 

9 Yds. Merino 29 

1 Slip Thread 

4 1/2 Yds. Lawn 2 1/2 

8 1/4 Yds. Blea'd Cotton 12 1/2 



2 Yds. Cloth 3.50 

12 Yds. Blea'd Cotton 13 

17 Spools Boss (sold in 3 lots) 
42 Spools Boss (sold in 7 lots) 
14 1/2 Yds. Cotton 17 1/2 

6 Thimbles 

3 Spools Floss 4 

2 cards Hooks & Eyes 2 1/2 
12 Yds. Ribbon 1 2/3 

8 Yds. Swiss Muslin 22 

10 Yds. Calico 7 1/4 
1 Lot Buttons 

11 Yds Fringe 

12 Yds. Velvet Ribbon 2 1/2 

10 Yds. Calico 7 

1 Yd. Green Beraize 

11 Gilt Buttons 
19 Yds. Calico 10 

12 3/4 Yds. Linen 12 1/2 

1 Gross Buttons 

9 Yds. Blk Calico 8 

10 Yds. Gingham 13 

4 Bolts capwire[?] (sold in 2 lots) 
16 Spools Boss (sold in 3 lots) 

18 Yds. B. Cotton 7 3/4 
1/4 Yd. Velvet 3.50 

2 1/2 Cards Hooks & Eyes 3 

1 5/8 Yds. Cassimere 34 

11 Yds. Blk. Calico 8 

10 Yds. Beraise delane 12 1/2 
6 Balls Tape (sold in 3 lots) 

12 Yds. Fancy Linen 10 

2 1/4 Yds. Fringe 

11 Balls Tape (sold in 5 lots) 

3 3/4 Yds. Janes 19 

4 Yds. Towell Linen 13 1/2 

5 Yds. Crash 16 1/2 

2 Yds. Irish Linen 57 
1 Box of Buttons 

1 doz. Buttons 

3 3/4 Yds. Calico 6 1/2 

4 Yds. Linen 15 

2 Sets Buttons (sold sep.) 
10 Yds. Nankeen 11 

1 3/4 Yd. Alpaca 68 

28 Yds. 5/4 Sheeting 14 

2 Yds Cloth 5.51 

5 1/2 Yds. 11/4 Sheeting 32 



149 



S.M. Nichols Inventory, 1859 (con't) 



5 Yds. 1174 Sheeting 35 
2 Yds. Irish Linen 48 
10 Yds. Nankeen 10 

7 Yds. Swiss Mouslin 27 
2 Yds. Cloth 3.05 

2 Yds Cloth 3.00 
1 Vest patern 

3 Yds. Bonnet Ribbon 9 

4 Yds. Cambrick 6 

7 1/4 Yds. Blue Cotton 9 
3 Yds. Calico 6 1/2 
3 Yds. Blk Satinette 52 
3 Cards Hooks & Eyes 

6 Yds. Cherokee Plaid 10 

6 Balls White Tape (sold in 3 lots) 
3/4 Yd. Cambrick 7 1/2 

16 3/4 Yds. Challi 15 

7 1/2 Yds. Calico 9 
1 Box of Boss 

1 Spool Silk 

1 Box Pills & Buttons 

3 1/8 Yds. Cassimere 1.65 
21 Yds. Mouslin 7 
12 Spools Boss (sold in 2 lots) 
12 1/4 Yds. Gingham 23 

7 1/4 Yds. Twill cotton 8 

2 balls Tape 1 

15 3/4 Yds. Flanel 25. 

3 Yds. Yellow Flannel 33 

6 3/8 Yds. Stripe Cotton 15 1/2 
2 1/2 Yds. Linen Lustre 10 

1 Card Buttons 

2 Cards Hooks & Eyes 3 

1 lb. Cotton Yarn 

2 1/2 Yds. Cassimere 80 

3 Balls Tape 2 

3 Cards Hooks & Eyes 4 
20 Yds. Calico 7 

8 Yds. Mori Antique 6 1/4 
3 3/4 Yds. Delaine 11 

3 1/2 Yds. challi 13 1/2 
8 1/2 Yds. Nankeen 9 
2 Yds. Nankeen 9 1/2 
14 Yds. Blk. Calico 8 1/2 
10 Yds. Gingham 12 172 
10 Yds. Nankeen 9 

7 1/4 Yds. Nankeen 9 1/2 

8 Yds. Twilled cotton 22 



3 1/2 Yds. Ky Janes 22 

13 1/2 Yds. Mouslin 23 

2 Yds. Cloth 3.50 

2 1/2 doz. Buttons 5 

5 3/4 Yds. Bed Ticking 14 

1 doz. Buttons 

8 1/8 Yds. Gray Cloth 2.10 

1 Lot Buttons 

8 Yds. Gingham 16 

2 Yds. Beraizo 26 



150 



S.M. Nichols Inventory, 1859 (con't) 



9 Yds. Merino 26 

2 7/8 Yds. Cassimere 97 1/2 

3 Yds. Cassimere 55 
1 Yarn Hood 

1 Yarn Hood 

2 Balls Tape 1/2 

8 Yds. Blue twill Cotton 16. 

3 Yds. Janes 22 1/2 

5 Yds. Bed Ticking 9 174 
3 Cards Hooks & Eyes 3 

1 Work Box 

3 Cards Buttons (sold sep.) 

2 Balls Tape 1/2 
28 Yds. Lawn 4 1/2 

5 1/8 Yds. Irish Linen 38 

1 Card Green Buttons 

1 Gross Buttons 

1 Set Buttons 

12 1/4 Yds. Calico 9 1/2 

1 Card Pearl Buttons 

1 Paper Buttons 

3 Yds. Nankeen 7 172 
1 Gross Buttons 

4 Cards Hooks & Eyes (sold in 2 lots) 
1 Gross Buttons 

5 Yds. Gingham 

5 3/4 Yds. Calico 8 1/2 

1 Box Buttons 

2 Cards Buttons 

5 3/4 Yds Cassimere 62 1/2 

6 Yds. Striped Linen 10 1/2 

2 Gross Buttons (sold in 2 lots) 

1 7/8 Yds. Striped cotton 10 1/2 
8 3/4 Yds. Calico 5 

2 1/2 Yds. Calico 6 1/2 
22 3/4 Yds. Calico 7 1/2 

3 1/3 Yds. Ribed cotton 12 172 

1 Spool Floss 

2 Cards Buttons (sold sep.) 

3 Balls Tape 

1 doz. Buttons 
6 3/4 Yds. Calico 7 

1 3/8 Yds. Lawn 5 

2 doz. Vest Buttons (sold sep.) 
1 Card Buttons 

12 Yds. Velvet Ribbon, 1 
1 7/8 Yds. Mouslin 9 1/2 
1 Card Buttons 



2 Yds. Flannel 29 

4 Cards Hooks & Eyes 3 
1 Lot Linen Buttons 
10 Yds. Calico 7 1/2 
1 7/8 Yds. Calico 5 1/2 

4 Yds. Calico 4 172 

10 3/4 Yds. Calico 8 
9 Yds. Calico 8 

6 1/4 Yds. Calico 8 
23 3/4 Yds. Mouslin 13 
23 Yds White drilling 17 
1 Card Pearl Buttons 

13 Yds. Fringe 12 172 

8 1/2 Yds. Gingham 15 

14 1/2 Yds. Plaid Mouslin 23 

9 Yds. Gingham 16 1/4 

6 Darning Needles 

3 Yds. Nankeen 9 

23 Yds. nankeen 8 172 

I Vest patern 

4 1/4 Yds. Cassimere 90 

5 1/2 Yds. Cassimere 75 
8 Yds. Beraise 16 

14 Buttons 

5 3/8 Yds. Cassimere 90 
26 Yds. Paper Camb 5 

4 1/2 Yds. Gingham 8 

13 1/4 Yds. Janes 21 

14 Yds. Blue Drills 10 

12 Yds. Blue Drills 11 172 

11 Yds. Calico 11 

8 Yds. Lawn 5 1/2 

7 1/2 Yds. lawn 5 

II Yds. Mouslin 17 

15 Yds. Ticking 12 172 

10 Yds. Ticking 12 172 

9 Yds. Ticking 12 172 

1 Work Box 

3 Yds. Cassinette 65 

2 Yds Mouslin 10 
1 Box of Needles 

5 5/8 Yds. Mouslin 10 1/2 
17 3/4 Yds. Mouslin 13 172 

8 1/2 Yds. Calico 7 

6 1/2 Yds. Gingham 13 
1 lb. Cotton Yarn 

6 3/4 Yds. Calico 8 

3 Yds. Gamboon 34 



151 



S.M. Nichols Inventory, 1859 (con't) 



11 Yds. Jac Camb 22 

11 Yds. Mouslin 13 

2 Yds. Green Beraise 28 
6 Yds. Summer Cassimere 21 
4 Yds. Tweed Cassimere 60 
2 3/4 Yds. Blk Cassimere 1.27 
2 3/4 Yds. Cassinette 82 1/2 

12 1/2 Yds. Cotton Check 16 1/2 
1 Carpet Sack 

10 3/4 Yds. Challi 19 
1 Pin cussion[sic] 

18 Yds. debaze 

6 1/2 Yds. Blk Calico 6 

7 7/8 Yds. Linen 
1 Carpet Sack 

4 1/2 Yds Cassimere 71 

1 Cards Hooks & Eyes 3 
15 5/8 Yds. Blue Drills 10 

2 Yds. Camb 9 

3 Cards Hooks & Eyes 

3 1/2 Yds. Cloth 3.06 1/4 

8 1/2 Yds. Mouslin 18 

4 Yds. Beraise Delane 13 

12 1/2 Yds. Beraise Delane 17 
3 Yds. Italiano Cloth 60 

9 Yds. Beraizie 16 

12 Yds. Stripe Cotton 10 1/2 

8 Yds. Stripe Cotton 11 

19 Yds. Gingham 12 1/2 

3 Yds. Gingham 11 

7 Yds. Calico 8c 

1/2 doz. Spools boss 4 

9 Yds. Gingham 14 

4 Cards Hooks & Eyes 3 

8 Yds. Stripe cotton 11 

11 5/8 Yds. Janes 21 
1 Set Buttons 11 

5 Yds. Gingham 16 

6 3/4 Yds. Swiss Muslin 26 
4 Yds. Beraise Delane 14 

1 Vest Paternfsic] 

12 Yds. Swiss Muslin 24 

1 lb. cotton 

2 Cards Hooks & Eyes 2 1/2 

12 3/4 Yds. Lawn 5 

13 Yds. Cambrick 9 

10 Yds. Challi 12 1/2 
2 1/8 Yds. Cloth 3.75 



1 remnant Velvet 

10 1/4 Yds. Mouslin 27 
12 Yds. Cambrick 9 

2 1/8 Yds Jac. Camb 31 
8 3/4 Yds. Jac Camb 30 

3 Cards Hooks & Eyes 2 1/2 
6 Yds. Jaconette Camb 22 
12 Yds. Challi 26 

10 3/4 Yds. Mouslin 14 1/2 

23 3/4 Blue Drills 9 

1 lb. Cotton 

10 Yds. Mouslin 12 V2 

Hardware 

4 Rifles 

1 Saw Handle 
6 Sheets Sand paper 
1 Gimblet 
1 Gimblet 

1 Hand Saw File 

2 Gimblets 3 1/2 
1 Mill Saw file 

1 File 

4 Chalk Lines (sold sep.) 

2 papers Tacks 3 
1 Bridle Bit 

1 pr. Compasses 

3 Handsaw files 7 
1 Fishing Line 

1 White Wash Brush 
1 paint Brush 
1 Paint Brush 

3 Handsaw files 6 
1 cow Hide 

1 Horse Rasp 

2 Gimblets 
1 Bolt 

1 Viol Oil Stone 

6 Mouse Traps (sold sep.) 

2 Steel Mouse Traps (sold sep.) 
1 Bolt 

1 Awl Handle 
1 Chalk Line 
1 File 
1 Box Gun Caps 

4 Gimblets (sold in 2 lots) 
1 Small Hammer 



152 



S.M. Nichols Inventory, 1859 (con't) 



3 Handsaw Files 8 

1 Round Rasp 

1 Lot Cradle fingers stuff 

1 Shovel Dung Hook &c 

1 Chaff Fork 

1 Fifth Chain 

1 crow barr 

2 Doubletrees & 1 Shovel Plow 
1 Lot of Old Iron 

1 Gimblet 

1 Chisel 

2 Chisels (sold sep.) 
1 Grubing Hoe 

1 Doubletree 

1 Trammel & Hammer 

1 Wagon Bed 

1 Pad Lock 

1 Horse Rasp 

1 File 

1 Gimblet 

6 Hand Saw Files 6 3/4 

1 pr. Sheep Shears 

1 Chissel 

1 Box Gun caps 

3 Gimblets 

1 Box Gun caps 

1 Axe 

1 Gimblet 

1 Hoe 

1 White Wash brush 

1 Viol Oil Stone 

6 Boxes Caps (sold in 3 lots) 

1 File 

1 Whip 

1 Cowhide 

2 Gimblets 3 1/2 

1 White Wash Brush 
1 Flesh Ball 
1 chalk Line 

1 File 

2 Gimblets 2 
2 Gimblets 2 
1 4/4 Auger 

1 Shot Gun 

2 Gimblets 3 
1 Square 

1 Chalk Line 
1 Iron Shovel 



1 Spike Gimblet 

3 Augers (sold sep.) 

1 Chalk Line 

1 Draw Knife 

1 Shot Gun 

1 3/4 Auger 

1 Lot Fish Lines 

1 Spike Gimblet 

2 Gimblets 
1 File 

1--5 [?] Auger 

1 Rasp 

1 Mill Saw File 

1 File 

2 Gimblets 2 1/2 
1 Auger 
lSaw 

ISaw 

1 Square 

2 pat[?] Rifles 2 1/2 
1 Hoe 

1 Bolt 

1 chalk Line 

1 Paint Brush 

2 Boxes Caps 5 
1 Lot Bridles 

1 Bench Screw 

1 Paint Brush 

2 Gimblets 2 

1 Buggy Whip 

2 Boxes Gun Caps 4 
1 Chalk Line 

1 Small Hammer 
1 Cowhide 

Books and Supplies 

1 Bot Ink 

1 Bot Red Ink 

2 Pencils (sold sep.) 
1 Lead Pencil 

1 Pencil 

1 pack Envolopesfsic] 

1 Bot. Ink 

1 Bot. Ink 

2 packs Envelopes 4 
1 Inkstand 

1 McGuffey's Reader 



153 



S.M. Nichols Inventory, 1859 (con't) 



1 Blank Book 

1 Inkstand 

1 Blank Book 

1 Pencil 

1 Blank Book 

1 Pencil 

1 Ink Stand 

1 Pencil 

1 Grammar 

3 packs Envelopes 6 

3 Packs Envelopes 3 

l--4th Reader 

l--4th Reader 

1 Philosophy 

1 Bible 

1 pack Envolopes 

1 2nd Reader 

1 Ink Stand 

1 Blank Book 

1 Hemans Reader 

1 Pack Envolopes 

1 Bot Ink 

1 Blank Book 

1 Pack Envolopes[sic] 

1 Pencil 

1 Philosophy 

1 Book 

1 Grammar 

1 Blank Book 

2 Geography of the Heavens (sold sep.) 
l-4th Reader 

1 Song Book 



Store Supplies 

1 pr. Ballances 

1 Clock 

1 Pr. Ballences 



154 



INVENTORY of JAMES H. NICHOLS 

Loudoun County 

1856 



Food and containers 

1 Box capsules 

2 bot sweet oil 

3 bot pain killer 
1 " Ginger 

3 bot pain killer 
1 bot sweet oil 

1 Doz nutmegs 

1 Mug & Ginger 

2 Bot sweet oil 
2 bot sweet oil 

1 bot R R Releif 
6 cakes chocolate 

1 bot salad oil 
10 lbs Rice 

5 cakes chocolate 

2 Vial Vermifuge 

6 papers Cinnamon 

1 set pepper boxes 

2 Doz nutmegs 
6 bot essence 

1 3/4 Ginger 
1 doz nutmegs 

4 vial essence 

1 G P (gunpowder?) Tea 

1 box pills? 

4 Lots Cinnamon 

2 bot mustard 

3 box pills 
24 nutmegs 

1 Vial Calomel 

3 papers Corn starch 

5 bot peppermint 
1/2 " Ginger 

1 plug tobacco 
172 G Ginger 
1 piece tobacco 

1 doz nutmegs 

2 Bot Phoenix Bitters 
2 oz mace 

10 lb Rice 

1 plug tobacco 

2 cakes chocolate 

2 Bot Essence 

3 bot of lemon 



5 lb Rice 

12 bot cayenn peper 
2 Bottles Opodeldock 
2 Doz nutmegs 

1 Lot Cinnamon 
1/2 lb long pepper 

2 Bottles P Killer 

5 lb Rice 

2 Bot Pain killer 

3 Bot G Mustard 

3 Vials syrup 
2 oz mace 

1/2 oz Cinnamon Bark 

2 Doz nutmegs 

4 Vials of pepper 

1 Lot Cinnamon 

6 papers Cinnamon 

3 Bot Bitters 

3 bot opedeldoc? 

4 vials essences 

2 vials essences 

1 bot pile ointment 

1/4 Tobacco 

"For Eggs sold" [21.56] 

3 Bottles wild cherry 

4 vials cayenne pepper 
1 lb Ginger 

4 oz Mace 

1 Lot Rhubarb 
10 lbs Rice 

5 lbs Rice 

2 Doz nutmegs 

2 Vials Vermifuge 

6 Boxes Pills 
5 lbs rice 

2 lbs Race Ginger 

2 lbs anise Root 

16 lbs Epsom Salts 

10 lbs Rice 

2 lbs G P (gunpowder?) Tea 

1 Bot welb(?) 

1 Bottle S Cordial 

2 Doz nutmegs 

1 1/2 lb G P (gunpowder?) Tea 
1 Piece Tobacco 
4 lbs Rice 



155 



J.H. Nichols Inventory, 1856 (con't) 



2 lbs G P (gunpowder?) Tea 
4 lbs Macaroni 

1 " Tobacco 

2 Doz nutmegs 
10 lbs Rice 

2 Bottles wild cherry 
1 lb Rhubarb Root 

1 jar trapper snuff 

2 Bottles sweet oil 

2 lbs Y H (young hyson?) Tea 

4 oz Magnesio 

2 lbs Y H (young hyson?) Tea 

5 lbs Rice 

2 lbs Y H (young hyson?) Tea 

3/4 lbs Tungreck(?) 

2 lbs Y H (young hyson?) Tea 

2 lbs G P (gunpowder?) Tea 

10 Lbs Rice 

4 1/2 lbs Y H (young hyson?) Tea 

2 Bottles salad oil 

180 Segars 

1 lb Fennel 

4 lbs Rice 

2 Bottles Vermifuge 
2 Doz Cigars 

1 lb G P (gunpowder?) Tea 

2 lbs G P (gunpowder?) Tea 
10 lbs Macaroni 

2 Bottles Hive Syrup 

1 3/4 lbs young H (hyson?) Tea 

5 Bottles Dearshear Cordial 
1 cake chocolate 

1 Ground Ginger 

6 Bottles Halls(?) Expectorant 

3 1/2 lbs race Ginger 

1 Doz Cigars 

2 Bottles Syrup 

1 Box & pipes 

3 Bush Corn 

2 Bushels Salt 

4 lbs Rice 

2 lbs Race Ginger 

1 Sack Salt 

2 lbs Y H (young hyson?) Tea 
16 nutmegs 

2 Doz nutmegs 

2 lbs Y H (young hyson?) Tea 

1 Barrel Pickles 



3 Bottles Opodeldock 

2 lb G P (gunpowder?) Tea 

Housewares 

1 set table spoons 
1 table cloth 
6 bowls 
1 Tin Pan 

4 Brooms 

1 set spoons 

6 box matches 

1 set tea spoons 

1 Glazed Jar (may have held tea in store) 

3 Butter plates 
1 oil cloth 

1 Lamp 

2 Salt cellars 

4 lamps 

1 blacking brush 

2 Comforts 

5 Sets spoons 

1 yellow pitcher 
1 Pitcher 
1 oil cloth 
1 Spoon 

1 cream freezor 

2 blue edge dishes 
18 1/2 yds matting 

1 comfort 

2 mugs 

2 cream mugs 

6 box matches 

6 small tin plates 
1 pair shears 
4 Bake Plates 
4 oz camphor 
1/2 " Sulphur 
1 sifter 

1 comfort 

2 pair scissors 
4 oz Indigo 

1 waiter 

1 cake soap 
4 oz Indigo 

2 pair shears 

1 looking glass 
4 nutmegs Graters 



156 



J.H. Nichols Inventory, 1856 (con't) 



1 Cream Jar 

5 bowls 

3 Pair curtain Bands 

6 Bowls 
1 sifter 

3 Bowls 

1 coffee mill 
1 churn 

1 Pair shears 

2 Pair small scissors 

1 flour duster 

2 milk Pots 

2 Candlestick 
2 Lamps 
1 stone Jug 
1 Pair shears 
1 Teakettle 
1 Tea Pot 

1 Pair shears 

2 Lamps 

1 Pair shears 
1 Pitcher 

4 cake cutters 
1 waffle Iron 

1 water can 

2 Blue dishes 

1 set Teaspoons 

1 Jar (may have held 5 lb rice in store) 

1 Glazed Jar (may have held 5 lb rice in 
store) 

2 Blue Edge dishes 
1 Plate Sack(?) 

1 Pair Blk brushes 

3 oz Camphor 

1 Lot wall paper 
8 oz Indigo 

3 Match guards 
1 Box Tapers 

4 oz Indigo 
1 Bar soap 
1 Waiter 

1 sifter 

1/2 oz sulphur 
?oz F Sulphor 
6 box matches 
4 oz Camphor 
4 oz Indigo 

2 oil cloths 



1 strainer 

2 box tapers 
2 bowls 

1 tin pan 

1 set large plates 

1 Looking Glass 

1 Looking Glass 

1 Pair Blk brushes 

1 coffee mill 

1 Porcelain kettle 

1 large dish 

1 set stone china 

1 set knives & forks 

2 set knives & forks 
1 set knives & forks 

1 pair Lamps 

2 tin pans 
2 tin pans 

1 set white plates 

1 set white plates 

2 Pair snuffers 
1 Broiling Iron 
1 Large Waiter 
4 oz Indigo 

1 waffle Iron 

1 set Teaspoons 

2 small waiters 
1 Looking Glass 

23 yds straw carpeting 
1 Table cover 
1 Comfort 
1 Pair shears 

1 Pair small scissors 

2 Glazed Jars(?) 
1 Set spoons 

1 Looking Glass 

3 papers Busisk(?) Lustres(?) 
1 Set Tea spoons 

1 Mug 

1 Cly Jar (may have held 10 lbs rice in 
store) 

2 Pair scissors 
1 stone jug 

1 set tea spoons 

2 Lamps 

2 Pair snuffers 

1 comfort 

1 butcher knife 



157 



J.H. Nichols Inventory, 1856 (con't) 



1 Bowl 

1 set T spoons 

2 bars soap 

6 boxes matches 

1 butcher knife 

2 tin cups 

1 pair shears 
1 Sausage Stuffier 
1 white dish 
1 comfort 
1 Screen 

1 set cups & saucers 

2 Fruit dishes 

4 cakes lardsoap 
2 bars soap 
2 white dishes 

1 mug 

2 blacking brushes 
2 balls soap 

2 boxes blacking 
4 oz Indigo 

1 butcher knife 

3 tin plates 

2 baking plates 
1 yellow pitcher 
1 white pitcher 
1 Broom 

6 box matches 
1 iron candlestick 
1 pair saltstands 
6 box matches 

1 set knives & forks 

2 Blacking brushes 

1 Fork 

6 boxes matches 
8 oz Indigo 

2 white dishes 

4 oz Indigo 
1 cake soap 

1 Pair Lamps 
4 oz Indigo 
1 mug 
4 oz Indigo 

1 stone Jar (may have held 4 lbs rice in 
store) 

2 lbs Soda 

3 lbs starch 
Earthen pot 



2 lbs Soda 
1 Glazed jar 
1 Basket 

1 stone Jar (may have held 4 lbs rice in 
store) 

2 lbs Soda 

1 Earthen Jar 

1 Set common Teas 

2 Cream mugs 
2 Lamps 

1 1/4 lbs Borax 

lTray 

1 Coffee Pot 

1 Pitcher 

1 Pair andirons 

1 stone pan 

2 sets white Plates 

2 Blue dishes 
1 Deep Dish 

1 Large Dish 
1 sifter 
1 small dish 
1 wash Bowl 

3 Brooms 

1 Bowl & Pitcher 

2 Lamps 

1 Small Dish 
1 Small Jar 
1 Lot Plates 

4 Earthen Pots 
23 1/2 lbs Starch 
1 large dish 

6 Towels 

I Comfort 

II Papers lampblack 
1 Sifter 

1 Earthen Jar 

4 Papers Polishing powder 

1 Blue Pitcher 

1 Tea Pot 

3 milk pans 

2 3/4 Lb Soda 
1 Bar soap 

I lot cups & saucers 

II oz Camphor 
12 Tumblers 

1 Screen 
9 Brooms 



158 



J.H. Nichols Inventory, 1856 (con't) 



1 stone Jar 




2 Pair scissors 


1 stone Jar (may have held 5 lbs rice in 


1 Tin Can 


store) 




1 Canister 


1 Lamp 




1 watering pot 


1 set Cups & saucers 




1 sifter 


2 tin cans 




2 Blacking brushes 


2 lbs Starch 




2 Pitchers 


4 oz Tannic 




4 oz Prussian Blue 


1 Bottle Blk Varnish 




2 Dusting brushes 


2 lbs Soda 




3 Balls Candlewick 


1 Earthen Jar 




1 clay Jar 


1 stone Jar (may have held 4 lbs rice in 


2 Jugs 


store) 




1 Looking Glass 


1 stone Jar (may have 


held 10 lbs rice in 


1 Jar 


store) 




2 Blacking brushes 


2 washboards 




1 Large Dish 


1 Large white dish 




1 Lot milk Pans 


1 Earthen Jar (may have held 5 lbs rice in 


1 Tray &c 


store) 




1 stone Jug &c 


1 Teapot 




1 Gridiron 


2 Pair Snuffers 




1 Bowl 


2 lb Soda 




1 set of spoons 


1 Set soup plates 




1 Table cloth 


1 Glazed Jar (may have held 5 lbs rice in 




store) 




Clothing and personal items 


5 Table spoons 






1 Lot Tinware 




1 Collar 


1 Cork screw 




1 Silk Hdkf 


1 water Pot 




2 Pair shoes 


3 Flower Jars 




1 Pair Gum shoes 


30 1/2 lbs Soap 




3 pair gloves 


8 oz Indigo 




4 Pair Gloves 


Jug 




4 Tuck combs 


2 Tin Cans 




2 pr. Gloves 


1 white dish 




2 Pocket combs 


3 Pair Snuffers 




3 Tuck combs 


2 Brooms 




2 Pair Kid Gloves 


2 Flower Pots 




1 Tobacco Purse 


2 Tin Pans 




1 spectacle case 


1 Bowl 




1 watch Guard 


1 Lot Glue 




1 Bonnet 


1 Screen 




6 Pair wooden combs 


1 Fork 




1 Pair Blk kid 


1 Tin Can 




1 Fan 


1 Earthen Jar (may have held 10 lbs rice 


2 Pair shoes 


in store) 




1 pair mits 


lCan 




1 Pair mits 


1 Earthen pan 




1 Pair worsted Mistets(?) 



159 



J.H. Nichols Inventory, 1856 (con't) 



2 Mustlets(?) 
1 Silk Veil 

5 Breast Pins 

1 Collar 

1 pair shoes 

1 Buck skin purse 

1 pair silk Gloves 

1 comb 

1 Collar 

1 Pair Gloves 

1 Portmonie 

1 Pair side combs 

1 Breast Pin 

1 Hat & Box 

1 Silk Hat 

3 Breast Pins 

2 Lots marbles 
1 pair boots 

7 Violin Strings 

3 Tobacco Purses 
1 pair boots 

3 fine tooth combs 
1 Pair Gloves 

1 Comb 

1 Hdkf 

2 umbrellas 

2 Pair Gaiters 

1 Pair shoes 

2 Pairs Boots 

2 Flannel Shirts 
1 Pair Boots 

1 pair Gloves 

2 pair shoes 
1 cloth brush 

4 combs 

1 stick silk(?) 
1 Silk Hat 
1 Pair Gaiters 
1 wool Hat 
1 Pair cuffs 
1 pair slipper 
1 hair brush 
1 Cap 

1 silk Hdkf 

3 Pair small shoes 
3 Tuck combs 

5 Combs 

2 shaving Boxes 



1 Pair Boots 

1 otter cap 

1 Lace Collar 

1 Pair sisters Gloves 

1 Lot watch keys 

1 Pair white Gloves 

21 Box Rogers Powder 

1 F W Collar 

2 Collars 

2 Spanish Brown 

1 Bot Cologne 

2 Coral Rings 

1 Tobacco Purse 
1 Lot shoe strings 
1 Silk Cravat 
1 worsted cap 
1 Pair cotton socks 
1 port monies 
1 Pair Gaiters 
1 spectacle case 
1 watch Guard 

1 Collar 

2 Shaving Boxes 
1 Silk Hat 

1 worsted shawl 
1 razor strop 
1 cloth cap 
1 vest pattern 
1 umbrella 
1 Hat 
4 Combs 
1 Pair Gloves 

4 Pair merino Gloves 
1 over coat 

3 Pair Blk Hose 

5 umbrellas 
1 Pair Str(?) 

1 Hat 

21 Tuck combs 
3 Tuck combs 

2 Pair side combs 

1 box shaving cream 

6 combs 

1 Pair suspenders 

2 Pair misses shoes 
1 Fan 

1 Straw Hat 

1 Lot Corset Laces 



160 



J.H. Nichols Inventory, 1856 (con't) 



3 Pair Gloves 

1 razor 

2 hair brushes 

3 Pair Glvoes 

6 Combs 

7 Tuck combs 

2 Pair shoes 

3 pair half hose 

3 pair worsted gloves 
2 Pair Fine boots 
5 Tuck Combs 

2 Pair worsted Gloves 

3 pair berlin gloves 
3 pair suspenders 

1 cloth brush 
1 razor strop 
1 razor 
1 Pair Boots 
1 Glazed Cap 
1 Pair Boots 
5 ham combs? 
lhdkf 
1 penknife 

1 segar case 

2 Pair Kid Gloves 

3 shaving Boxes 
1 Fan 

3 pocket books 
1 over Coat 
3 Pair shoes 

5 Pair shoes 

1 GuayaguiK?) Hat 

1 Bonnets 

1 silk Hat 

1 Pair Gum shoes 

1 Lot Corset Laces 

1 Pair shoes 

2 Pair Boots 
2 Pair Boots 

1 Pair Ready made Pants 

1 Pair shoes 

2 cloth caps 
2 Pair Boots 

6 Collars 

2 Pair Blk hose 

3 Pair Hose 
1 wool Hat 

1 Silk Cravat 



1 Pair kid Gloves 

3 collars 

2 Pair shoes 

1 Pair Boots 

2 Pair Combs 
1 silk cravat 

4 pocket combs 

3 chake (cake?) shaving soap 

1 silk stock 

4 pair socks 

2 Collars (mourning) 

3 Pair Gloves 

7 shaving brushes 

1 port monie 

lCap 

1 wool Hat 

1 Pair Gloves 

1 Pair Gloves 

1 white Vest 

1 silk Hat 

3 Pair shoes 

3 Pair Gloves 

6 Collars 

1 white Fur Hat 

1 Pair Pants 

3 pair shoes 

1 Pair Boots 

1 pair suspenders 

1 Hat 

1 hair brush 

3 pair suspenders 
3 pair childrens hose 

2 pair berlin gloves 
1 pair gaunlets 

3 Pair Blk Hose 
1 pair blk hose 
1 cloth brush 
lbelt 

1 Lot Hair Pins 

2 Tuck combs 

1 lot wooden combs 
1 Bonnet 

3 Toilet combs 
1 glazed cap 

1 straw hat 
1 Bonnet 
1 paper musk 
3 Pair kid Gloves 



161 



J.H. Nichols Inventory, 1856 (con't) 



2 pair shoes 

1 pair gum shoes 

1 doz ham combs 

2 shaving boxes 

1 vest 

2 Pair Gloves 

4 Pairs small shoes 

3 Pair Combs 
3 pair gloves 
3 Pair Gloves 

2 pair misses hose 
1 silk hdkf 

1 vest 

1 Glazed Cap 

1 straw hat 

3 Pair Gloves 
3 collars 

1 purse 

1 F W collar 

1 parasal 

1 vest 

3 pair silses? gloves 

2 pair white cot hose 
2 Pair Cotton Hose 

1 purse 

2 pair kid gloves 

4 fans 

1 cloth cap 

4 Tuck combs 

2 cravats 

1 hair brush 
1 tooth brush 
1 cloth brush 
1 breastpin 

1 breastpin 

2 pair socks 

1 flannel shirt 

1 pack card 

1 cravat 

1 Pair shoes or Boots 

1 tuck comb 

1 tuck comb 

1 Linen Hdkf 

1 shaving brush 

2 Toilet combs 

3 pair combs 

1 bot pomades 
1 silk hdfk 



I Tobacco Purse 

II pair wooden combs 
3 gingham hdkf 

1 lot marbles 
6 pair combs 

2 pair Berlin gloves 

1 spectatle case 

5 Gloves (or 1 lot Gloves) 

2 hair combs 

2 standing collars 
1 over coat 

1 Pair shoes 

2 Hats 

1 cap 

2 Pair kid Gloves 

2 Pairs Gaiters 

3 pair boots 

2 spectacles cases 

4 tobacco purses 
2 shaving boxes 

1 leghorn hat 

2 breast pins 
1 collar 

1 vest pattern 
1 bot colognes 

3 pair boots 

3 tobacco mappin? 
1 pen knife 
1 Pair shoes 
1 bot pomades 

1 collar 

2 Pair shoes 
1 snuffbox 

1 pair boots 
1 Pair side combs 
1 Pair mits 
1 Pair Boots 

1 Belt slide 

2 pair gloves 
1 razor 

1 Silk Vest 
1 parasol 
1 tuck comb 
1 Glazed Cap 
1 leghorn hat 
1 cravat 

6 standing collars 
1 pair slippers 



162 



J.H. Nichols Inventory, 1856 (con't) 



1 Fan 

4 tuck combs 
1 pair sleeves 
1 pair cuffs 
1 pair sleeves 

1 F W collar 

2 pair cott hose 
2 pair blk hose 
1 pair gaunlets 
1 pair gaunlets 

1 box & 2 pair gloves 
21 pair mits 

lfan 

2 fans 

4 box hair pins 

1 Pair Boots 

1 vest pattern 

1 shawl 

lComb 

1 Linen Hdkf 

4 pair shoes 

1 Tuck comb 

1 worsted cap 

1 Shawl 

1 Shawl 

1 Tuck comb 

1 Pair cuffs 

3 pair shoes 

4 Pairs shoes 

1 pair slippers 

2 combs 

6 night caps 

1 Pair cuffs 

4 pair worsted(?) 

2 bonnets 

2 bot pomade 
1 lot violin strings 
1 pair shoes 
1 pair shoes 
1 Lot Marbles 
1 pair kid gloves 
1 Pair Boots 
1 Small Hat 
1 pr shoes 
1 worsted cap 
1 Lot Jews harps 
4 Pair shoes 
lCap 



1 pr Boots 

1 Pair shoes 

2 night Caps 
1 Pair Shoes 

1 worsted Cap 

1 Lot rings & combs 

1 Pair shoes 

1 Pair side Combs 

1 Pair Boots 

4 Pairs shoes 

3 Pair shoes 
1 Pair shoes 
1 Pair Boots 

1 Pair Boots 

2 Pair Gloves 
6 Pair Shoes 

1 Silk Cravat 

2 Pairs shoes 

3 Pair Gloves 

4 Pair Cotton Hose 
1 Leghorn Hat 

1 over Coat 
1 Silk Hdkf 
1 Silk Hdkf 

1 silk Hat 

2 Pair silk Gloves 

3 Linen Hdkfs 
2 cloth caps 

1 Silk Hat 

2 cloth caps 

4 Pair Gloves 

1 Pair fine Boots 

3 Glazed Caps 

2 Pair Kid Gloves 
1 pair Boots 

3 Pair sleeves 

5 Pairs shoes 
1 pair Boots 

1 Pair shoes 

21 Flannel shirts 

2 Watch Guards 
1 Linen Hdkf 

1 Pair shoes 

1 wool Hat 

2 pairs Boots 
2 Pair shoes 
1 silk shawl 

1 Pair Shoes 



163 



J.H. Nichols Inventory, 1856 (con't) 



1 Fur Hat 

1 Pair Shoes 

1 Pair Kid Gloves 

1 pair Boots 

2 Pair Kid Gloves 

3 Glazed caps 
6 combs 

2 Pair Kid Gloves 

2 Pair shoes 

1 Lot marbles & Flints 

4 Pair Gloves 
1 wool Hat 

1 Cap 

8 pairs shoes 

4 Packs Cards 

3 pair Boots 
1 wool Hat 

6 Pairs shoes 
1 Pair shoes 
1 Silk Hat 

1 Bonnet 

5 Pair shoes 

2 Pair shoes 
1 Pair shoes 

6 Pair side combs 
1 Pair Boots 

1 shawl & 2 caps 
1 Hat 

7 caps & 1 collar 
1 Glazed Cap 

1 cloth cap 

1 Gland(?) Cap 

3 Pair Gloves 

4 Pairs shoes 

2 pair Shoes 

5 Tuck Combs 
2 Hatboxes 

1 Silk Hat 

1 silk Hat 

2 Pair fine Boots 
2 Pair shoes 

1 Pair Boots 

13 Pair spectacles 

1 Silk Hat 
4 Caps 

2 Pair shoes 
1 Cap 

1 Pair Boots 



1 Pair shoes 

1 Pair shoes 

2 Pair shoes 
2 Cloth Caps 



1 Pair shoes 
1 Pair shoes 
4 Pair shell combs 

1 Linen Hdkf 

3 Lots Combs 

2 Pair Shoes 

1 Pair small Boots 
1 Pair shoes 

1 Pair Boots 

2 Silk Hats 

4 Pair Gloves 

1 Pair shoes 

2 Pair shoes 
2 Caps 

2 pair shoes 
2 Glazed Caps 
1 Silk Cravat 
1 Pair Gum Boots 
1 Shawl 

1 pr shoes 

2 Pair Shoes 
1 Pair Boots 

Dry goods and notions 

13 Pieces Ribon 

4 1/2 yds Velvet Edge 

12 Bunches Tape 

4 Lots Thimbles 

13 3/4 yds Calico 
9 slips Thread 

1 Bunch Flowers 
1 Bunch of Brade 
9 skeins silk 

5 yds nankeen 

1 Doz Thimbles 

1 Piece Flannel 

2 Lots Thimbles 
5 Cards Buttons 
4 Gross Button 

3 Doz skeins Boss 

I 3/4 Doz Buckles 

II 172 yds Blk Silk 

15 yds Twill Bl Cotton 



164 



J.H. Nichols Inventory, 1856 (con't) 



6 yds Edging 

29 Bunches brade 
20 5/8 yds Blk silk 

1 Vest Pattern 
8 yds Gingham 

2 Doz Pearl Buttons 

7 Thimbles 

1 Set Buttons 

2 Doz skeins Boss 

3 yds Inserting 

I Lot F W Cotton 
6 yds Jeans 

II 3/4 yds Flannel 
6 sheets wadding 

6 Bolts ribbon wire 
24 spools Boss 
47 Bunches Tapes 
1 Piece Ribon 

1 silver Thimble 
5 papers needles 
10 174 yds Ribon 

2 Lots Ribbons 
2 Pieces Ribon 
18 Doz Buttons 
1 Piece Ribon 

4 1/2 yds merino 
12 spool Boss 

1 Doz Bunches Tape 

1 Lot Buttons 

1 Lot worsted 

1 Box & Brade 

1 1/2 doz Vest buckles 

24 spools Boss 

1 Box and Cord 

18 Thimbles 

1 Piece Ribon 

2 Doz skeins Boss 
1 Box and Buttons 
1 Vest Pattern 

1 Cord & Tassel 
1 Lot Buttons 
Tuck combs 

5 1/2 yds Tarleton 

19 1/2 yds Ribon 
15 Doz Buttons 

1 Lot Buttons 
1 Bunch Velvet 
12 Doz Buttons 



6 yds Irish Linen 
2 Boxes wafers 
2 papers Buttons 

4 1/2 yds Ribbon 
1 yd Beraze 

10 1/2 yds F Merino 

1 Lot Beads 

2 3/4 yds Blk Cassimer 

3 yds Casimer 

5 yds white Flannel 

2 Lots worsted 

3 5/8 yds cambric 
1 Lot coat binding 
1 Vest Pattern 

1 Box crosha(crochet?) needles 

1 Piece cambric 

2 Doz skeins Boss 
20 yds Lace 

18 1/4 yds Edging 

4 1/2 yds Laces 
1 Piece Ribon 

11 yds Edging 

12 yds Flannel 
24 spools Boss 
1 Lot worsted 

15 yds Cashmere 
1 1/2 yds Pl'd Cassimer 
10 yds merino 
1 Piece Calico 

6 1/2 yds Red muslin 

8 Cards Hooks & Eyes 
6 yds Cassimer 

10 yds Blk silk 
18 1/4 yds Alapacca 
1 1/2 yds Pl'd Casimer 
1 Lot Pearl Buttons 

3 yds cambric 

6 yds Linen 

1 1/2 yds Pl'd Cassimer 

9 1/2 yds Musdelain 

9 yds Fig'd Alapacca 

10 yds Mosdelain 
1 Vest Pattern 

5 yds Green merino 

7 5/8 yds Pl'd Muslin 
3 yds Inserting 

1 Doz skeins Boss 

2 Doz skeins Boss 



165 



J.H. Nichols Inventory, 1856 (con't) 



15 yds cashmere 

5 yds Jeans 

3 yds Pl'd muslin 

6 yds Calico 

7 3/4 yds touill Linen 
2 Doz skeins Boss 

1 1/2 yds silk Florence 
1 Lot worsted 
20 1/2 yds Ticking 
1 1/4 yds Blue Satin 
69 3/4 Yds Cotton 

4 1/2 yds Silk Plaid 

1 Doz Thimbles 

2 3/8 yds Flannel 
6 yds Check 

? yds Pl'd muslin 
6 Doz Buttons 
1 Vest Pattern 
6 yds casinett 

3 yds Casinett 

6 1/2 yd white Flannel 

4 1/2 Doz Buttons 

1 Doz Bunches Tape 
3 yds casinett 

7 yds alapacca 
3 yds Cassimer 

2 Pieces Ribon 

1 Lot Buttons 
111/4 yds Calico 

2 Doz skeins Boss 

5 yds Check 

3 7/8 yds Cassimer 

5 Bolts Tape 

6 yds Jeans 

2 Vest Buckles 

5 yds Calico 

2 Cards Hooks & Eyes 

3 1/2 yds Velvet(?) Ribon 

4 3/8 yds ribbon 
2 7/8 yds ribbon 

7 3/4 yds ribbon 
1 doz thimbles 

1 doz cards hooks & eyes 
1 vest pattern 

6 3/4 yds ribbon 
1 lot needles 

5 7/8 yds full cloth 

6 3/4 yds white ribon 



6 yds twill flannel 
13 yds red velvet 
4 yds linen diaper 
19 yds nankeen 

1 Box wafers 

1 gross metal buttons 

13 yds purple cambric 

8 yds french merino 
1 lot coat binding 

1 doz thimbles 

4 yds canvass 

5 cards hooks & eyes 
31 yds lace 

3 yds cassimer 
3 1/2 yds ribbon 
3 7/8 yds gingham 

2 bunches silk velvet 
17 yds lawn 

2 yds lustre 

3 1/4 yds alapacca 

7 yds ribon 

2 1/4 yds ribon 

7 yds ribbon 

2 yds ribon 

21 yds silk brade 

3 cords & tassel 

9 yds calico 

16 1/2 yds calico 

10 1/2 yds Calico 

5 yds table linen 
12 yds mosdelane 

9 yds mosdelane 

10 yds mosdelane 

3 3/4 yds Beraze 

8 yds Gingham 

6 Doz Buttons 

12 spools white Boss 
12 Vest Buckels 
174 Thread 
8 Bunches Beads 

22 7/8 yds Red Linsey 
1 Lot Cord 

111/2 yds mosdelane 
10 yds mosdelane 
6 balls tape 
1 piece paper cambric 

4 yds braze de Lain 

5 cards hooks & eyes 



166 



J.H. Nichols Inventory, 1856 (con't) 



6 yds calico 
18 yds calico 

3 spool silk floss 

1 vest pattern 

3 yds linen drilling 

8 3/4 yds col'd cambric 
111/2 yds debaze 

7 1/2" yds white flannel 
6 yds check 

3 yds cassimer 

9 3/4 yds gingham 

2 yds jeans 

10 yds calico 
41 yds calico 

1 card buttons 
10 yds cottonade 

4 yds cassimer 

2 1/2 yds jeans 

3 yds bl cotton 

3 yds cassimer 
20 1/2 yds Lawn 

6 yds col'd cassimer 

9 1/4 yds mus de Lain 

2 1/2 yds diaper 

4 yds blk. cloth 

10 1/2 yds berage de Lain 
1 gross buttons 

20 yds braze de lain? 
15 1/2 yds drilling 

3 yds jeans 

8 doz buttons 
20 yds calico 
20 yds calico 

1 lot vest buckles 
3 yds drilling 

9 yds drilling 
3 yds casinett 
34 yds calico 

12 yds twill cotton 
29 yds calico 

6 3/4 yds calico 

7 yds cott cassimer 

1 vest pattern 

8 blue cambric 

2 3/4 yds duck linen 

5 3/4 duck linen 

3 yds drilling 

37 3/4 pair bleu? cotton 



1 spool floss 
3 gross buttons 
10 yds cottonade 
5 spools boss 

7 doz pearl buttons 
1 gross buttons 

3 1/2 doz brass button 

8 doz buttons 

4 yds calico 

8 3/4 yds calico 
10 yds calico 
26 1/4 yds calico 

5 1/4 yds paper cambric 
1 lot buttons 

1 lot buttons 
8 yds calico 
10 yds sustig? 

2 doz brass button 

1 gross buttons 

10 1/2 yds paper? cambric 

3 yds gingham 

2 yds red flannel 
1 yd nankeen 

4 1/2 yds Crash 

6 yds braze de Lain 

18 1/2? yds braze de Lain 
1 card motto wafers 
1 3/4 yds col'd flennen? 
16 doz pearl buttons 

3 box pins 

1 1/2 yds twill cotton 

5 1/4 yds yellow flannen 
10 yds summer coating 
211/4 yds burlaspe cotton 
12 Spools Boss 

5 yds full linsey 

12 Bunches Bobin 

1 Box crasha (crochet?) needles 
18 yds Fringes 

4 yds Lawn 

15 Cards Hooks & Eyes 
1 Lot Worsted 
28 yds oil calico 

13 yds silk 

8 yds musdelane 

1 Lot worsted 

1 Lot Corset stay 

13 Bunches Linen Tapes 



167 



J.H. Nichols Inventory, 1856 (con't) 



12 Thimbles 

13 yds Calico 
18 spools Boss 
36 yds Edging 

14 slips Thread 

1 Box crosha (crochet?) needles 

12 Bunches Bobin 
1 spool silk 

1 Lot worsted 

9 cards Hooks & Eyes 
3 yds Cassimer 

21 3/4 yds Edging 
8 yds Blue Lawn 
8 yds Inserting 
25 yds Blue Lawn 
3 yds Cassimer 
3 yds Corderoy 
3 3/4 yds cottonade 
1 Vest Pattern 
3 yds Corderoy 
1 Vest Pattern 

3 yds Ribbon 

4 Bunches Ribon wire 
1 Vest Pattern 

6 slips Blk Thread 

1 Doz whale Bones 

10 yds oil calico 

2 yds Illusion 
18 1/4 yds Lace 

3 yds Cassimer 

2 yds Inserting 

3 yds Cassimer 

1 Card Hooks & Eyes 

13 1/2 yds Calico ' 
8 Doz Buttons 

5 3/8 yds Cambric 

2 silver Thimbles 

7 1/2 yds cap Ribon 

1 Piece paper cambric 

5 papers pins 

25 yds Cottonade 

2 yds Ribon 

6 Boxes Hooks & Eyes 
6 Vest straps 

6 slips Thread 

4 papers pins & Box 

3 yds Blk crape 

3 papers darning needles 



15 yds silk 

1 Card wafers 

1 Doz Buttons 

2 Thimbels 

10 3/4 yds Ribon 

3 yds Corderoy 

6 Doz Buttons 
9 slips Thread 
1 Doz Buttons 

1 Spool purse silk 

12 Spools Col'd Boss 

1 Vest Pattern 

2 Bunches Cord 

2 Bunches Flowers 

1 Doz Thimbles 

9 yds Mosdelaines 
111/2 yds Braze de lain 

4 yds Diaper 

13 yds delaine 

5 yds Casimer 

2 Vest Pattern 
40 1/2 yds Cotton 
1 3/4 yds Blk cloth 

4 1/2 yds F Muslin 
111/2 yds Alapacca 
1 Box & Flowers 

1 Piece Corderoy 

11 yds Glazed Cambric 

6 1/2 yds ThreeK?) 

7 yds merino 

8 yds Gingham 

3 yds Corderoy 

10 yds Gingham 
8 1/2 yds padding 

2 1/2 yds Bobinett 

2 Doz skeins worsted 

3 1/2 yds Berage 
48 skeins silk 
21 skeins silk 

8 yds sheeting cotton 

7 1/2 yds Gingham 

14 yds F Merino 

5 3/4 yds Linen Diaper 
2 1/3 Doz thimbles 

1 Piece webb 

16 yds lionesse cloth 

4 yds Ful linsey 

5 1/2 yds cambric 



168 



J.H. Nichols Inventory, 1856 (con't) 



6 3/4 yds Jeans 

1 3/4 yds Linsey 

1 1/2 yds Satin cassimer 

10 3/4 yds check 

27 yds Bro Cotton 

10 yds check 

16 3/4 yds Cambric 

10 yds nankeen 

1 1/4 yds Cassimer 

24 yds Cotton 

5 yds Celesia 
8 1/2 yds lace 

3 yds overcoating 

3 yds casinet 

6 yds K Jeans 
6 yds Alpacca 

6 1/8 yds swiss muslin 
20 yds Mosdelaine 

8 3/4 yds Linsey 

25 1/2 yds Blu Cotton 
1 yd Serge 

1 Piece merino 
1 1/4 yds Serge 

9 yds Gingham 
15 yds inserting 

6 1/2 yds Calico 

9 yds Bobinett 

4 yds ThrilK?) 
1 Lot Lace 

1 Bolt Gimp 

1 Lot worsted 

2 yds Satteen 

10 1/4 yds Cambric 

3 3/4 yds Pink Crape 

2 Pieces alapacca 

1 7/8 yds F Merino 
1 Piece alapacca 

5 3/4 yds F Muslin 
1 7/8 yds Florence 

4 yds Bobinett 

1 Piece Alapacca 

3 yds Threel 
9 yds celesia 

1 Piece corded muslin 
1 Piece Bobinett 

7 yds Alapacca 

1 Lot Buckles &c 
20 3/4 Doz Buckles 



1 1/4 yds Satin serge 

2 yds Serge 

1 1/8 yds oil silk 
6 yds Bro cotton 

1 Piece Blue Cotton 

2 1/8 yds corded muslin 
4 Doz Buckles 

12 1/2 Doz buckles 
2 Bolts Fringe 

4 Bolts trimming 
2 Bolts Gimp 

1 Lot Cord 

2 Lots Ribbon 

3 Bolts Ribbon 

1 Gross Buttons 

17 Doz Buttons 

1 Doz Buttons 

1 1/2 yds Twill Cotton 

1 yd Velvet 

9 yds mosdelaine 

5 yds Tarleton Muslin 
1 Lot Flowers 

8 3/4 yds merino 
1 3/4 yds net 

I Lot webb 

II yds nankeen 
11 yds Gingham 

11 yds nankeen 

9 1/2 yds Celesia 
1 Lot Buttons 

12 Doz Buttons 

8 3/4 yds Bro Cotton 
21 1/2 yds Florence 

4 1/4 yds Bro Cotton 
12 yds Jeans 

12 yds Jeans 

6 yds cambric 

35 1/2 yds Bro Cotton 
1 Lot Cotton Bats 
12 sheets wadding 

1 Bolt silk cord 

3 yds Tarleton muslin 

2 Doz skeins worsted 

10 yds Bro Cambric 
8 yds F muslin 

1 Piece Velvet 
24 yds nankeen 

3 Doz skeins worsted 



169 



J.H. Nichols Inventory, 1856 (con't) 



5 Cards motto wafers 
2 Pieces Cambric 
10 yds Ribbon 

5 yds Bro Cotton 

1 Vest Patern 
8 yds Check 

2 1/4 yds mosdelan 

7 3/8 yds Thorl(?) 
211/4 yds osnaburg 
1 Lot Gimps 

20 yds Twill Cot 

3 Pieces Alpacca 

8 yds L lustre 
1 Lot Buttons 
1 Lot Gimps 

1 Lot Edging 

1 Lot Gimps &c 

10 1/2 yds Bro Holland 

19 1/2 yds Linen 

6 Thimbles 

1 lot worsted 

40 1/2 yds Bro Cotton 

1 Lot worsted 

16 1/2 yds mosdelaine 
6 yds Linen 

8 slips Thread 

2 yds Diaper 

38 1/2 yds Calico 
5 1/2 yds Cassimer 

5 3/4 yds Edging 
3/8 yds oil Silk 

3 Lots knitting needles 
10 yds Cotton ade 

26 1/4 yds Pl'd Cotton 

6 yds Jeans 

1 worsted lot 

1 Bunch Velvet Ribbon 

24 spools Boss 

3 Doz skeins Boss 

1 Lot edgings 

1 Lot Edgings 

2 yds Pl'd silk 

3 yds Corderoy 

10 yds Pl'd muslin 
6 yds Silk Fringe 

1 Lot Edgings 

9 yds F Merino 

2 Doz skeins Boss 



3/4 yds Blue Florence 

3 yds Ink(?) Drilling 

6 1/2 Doz coat Buttons 

2 Hanks Cotton 

2 Skeins Silk 

2 1/2 yds F Merino 

2 Bunches worsted 

3 Doz knitting needles 
6 3/4 yds Linen Drilling 
3 yds Casimer 

3 yds Casinett 

1 Lot F Thread 

2 yds Lionesse cloth 
2 Doz skeins worsted 
11 yds Mosdelaine 

6 yds F Merino 

2 1/2 yds Pl'd Casimer 
9 yds Gingham 

I Bolt Footing 

3 yds Corderoy 

4 1/2 yds Alapacca 

9 yds Gingham 

10 yds Pl'd debaze 

II yds mosdelaine 
4 1/2 yds Casinett 
13 1/2 yds Linen 

1 Vest Patern 

4 Doz skeins Boss 

13 Cards Hooks & Eyes 

5 1/2 yds Casimer 

3 Doz skeins worsted 
1 Vest Patern 

1 Vest Patern 
111/2 yds Calico 

2 3/4 yds Drilling 

8 yds Pl'd cottonade 

4 Bolts Ribbon 

6 yds check 

3 yds Drilling 

8 yds Linen Lustre 

4 yds Ribbon 

6 slips Thread 

1 Box Darning needles 
8 yds Edging 

2 papers Darning needles 

1 Vest Patern 

2 papers Darning needles 
1 Piece Velvet 



170 



J.H. Nichols Inventory, 1856 (con't) 



12 Doz Buttons 

1 Box Pearl Buttons 

I Box & Buttons 

II Buttons 

7 1/2 Doz metal Buttons 
10 yds Calico 

1 Piece corded muslin 
3 Gross Eyelets 

8 yds Drilling 
1 Vest Buckle 

10 yds Dotted muslin 

3 yds Three(?) 

4 Doz Buttons 

1 Piece nankeen 

1 1/2 yds Bishop Lawn 

3 yds net 

10 yds Gimp 

3 Hames(?) fasteners 

1 lot Button molss(?) & Thread 

1 Bolt Lace 

2 7/8 yds Linen Drilling 

3 yds Red Linen 

2 Bolts Velvet ribbon 

3 Doz Buttons 

14 Lasting buttons 

2 yds muslin 

3 yds Jeans 

19 3/4 yds col cambric 
7 yds Blu cotton 

13 1/2 yds Calico 

6 yds Jeans 

1 yd Bonnet Silk 
1 Lot worsted 
1 Lot Thimbles 

4 Cards motta wafers 

1 Piece Satin 

7 1/2 yds Flannel 
10 yds check 

12 yds delaine 

5 yds Blue Velvet 

3 1/2 yds Calico 
211/2 yds Linen diaper 

4 3/4 yds Cloth 

3 yds Irish Linen 

5 yds Flannel 

6 Slips Thread 

12 yds Brown Linen 

2 crosha (crochet?) needles 



2 Doz skeins silk 

4 Doz Skeins silk 
15 1/2 yds Cambric 

24 skeins silk 

1 spool Twist 

2 Bunches Cord 

1 Box Cord 

10 yds delaine 

2 1/2 yds sattinett 

1 Bolt Gimp 

25 yds osnaburg 

11 3/4 yds Cottonade 

2 1/2 yds Berage 

3 yds Irish Linen 
3 yds Corderoy 

21 Bunches Brade 
24 spools Boss 

3 yds Casinett 

Hardware 

1 bunch fishing lines 

1 lot awls 

1 set Fish Hooks 

10 gr augers 

5 whet boards 

4 whetstones 

3 bars lead 

6 1/2 lbs spikes 
1 bridle rein 

1 Gimlet 

1 axe 

2 curry combs 2 cards 

4 Doz screws 
6 gimlets 

2 whet stones 
172 lb Blue Stone 

1 Pitch fork 

6 fishing lines 

2 Bottles oil spike 

1 Lot Lead 

2 white Mr? brushes 

11 Ball shoe thread 
1 lot awls 

1 bridle bit 

2 Horse Rasps 

1 mowing scythes 
4 Box caps 



171 



J.H. Nichols Inventory, 1856 (con't) 



2 Curry Combs 
5 chalk lines 
11 sheets sandpaper 
1 Bridle Bit 

1 Doz Mahogany knobs 

2 Boxes caps 
10 scythes 

1 small saw 

4 papers nails? 

4 pr martingles rings 

3 box caps 

1 axe 

2 gimlets 

1 mowing (?) 

3 Shoe Rasps 

1 riding whip 

4 papers tacks 
3 bars lead 

2 Horse Cards 
2 Blk Lead 

2 pair panlocks? 

2 Horse cards 

2 Painted Buckets 

1 axe 

2 Doz awls 

2 Horse Rasps 
1 Peg cutter 
1 Cedar Bucket 
1 Riding whip 
1 pair stirrups 
1 Tin Bucket 
1 horse (?) 

5 wooden fossits 

1 lot awls 

2 pair yanlocks? 

1 Set Fishing Hooks 
1 pr Locks 

1 Horse Rasp 

2 shoe Rasps 
1 bridle bit 

1 bridle bit 
1 Lot Button moulds 
1 Lot safety fuse 
18 Ball shoe Thread 

3 rifles 

1 Latch & Lock 
7 sheets sandpaper 
3 boxes gun caps 



1 bridle bit 

4 Bot oil spikes(?) 

1 paint brush 

1 Lot Flint 

6 Gimlets 

1 Curry comb 

2 Bridle Bits 

1 Square 

2 whetstones 

4 bot oil spikes? 

9 2/3 Doz screws 

2 1/3 Doz screws & Rings 

3 riding whip 

4 rawhides 

1 carriage whip 

3 bits 

1 wooden bucket 
1 lot knobs 
1 lot hinges 
1 Tin Bucket 

10 scythes 

1 Tin Bucket 

4 rifles 

3 awl handles 

4 paper brads 
3 box caps 

6 Boxes Caps 

1 cedar? bucket 

25 Panes Glass 

1 sadle 

1 Pad Lock 

1 lot traps 

1 Lantern 

1 Bunch sandpaper 

1 shoe hammer 

1 Riding whip 

1 C scythes 

2 mowing scythes 
1 scythe 

1 cedar Bucket 
36 Doz nails 

3 Pad Locks 

1 Lot Fish Hooks 

1 Backhand 

1 Garden Plough 

1 Hoe 

1 Bridle 

1 Bottle Varnish 



172 



J.H. Nichols Inventory, 1856 (con't) 



1 oil can 
1 Saddle 

1 Bucket 

2 small Tubs 
1 Large Tubb 

60 lbs Spanish whiting 
1 pair steelyards 

52 lbs Rags 

1 Box chrome Yellow 

6 Balls shoe thread 

1 Box & awls 

1 Double Barrel Gun 

1 lot Cord 

1 wheelbarrow 

1 hatchet 

18 1/2 " nails 

1 Cedar Tub 

29 Pains Glass 

1 P Fork 

1 four P Fork 

1 tobacco Knife & nail tongs 

1 Keg & chisel 

1 Pitchfork 

1/2 lbs Blue stone 

1 Pail 

2 wooden Buckets 

4 3/6 " Spanish whiting 
16 Pair Butt Hinges 

1 Pad Lock 

1 Keg & contents 

1 Hand Saw 

5 lbs G Logwood 
1 cedar Bucket 

1 pail 

5 lbs Madder 
4 lbs Blk Lead 

2 Scythes 

1 tin bucket 
18 lbs nails 

3 Doz Martingale rings 
10 stirrups 

53 lbs nails 
10 lbs Shot 
1 Bridle Bit 

3 Pair stirrups 

4 Door latchers 

21 Balls shoe Thread 
12 lbs Shot 



20 lbs Shot 

2 mowing scythes 

10 3/4 lbs redwood 

1 Keg white Lead 
10 Rakes 

2 lbs sulphur 

3 mowing snaths 
1 3/4 lb Redwood 
1 lb Copperas 

1 four P Fork 

2 Pitch fork 

1 four P Fork 

1 Scythe 

13 lbs Rosin 

15 Balls shoe Thread 

1 Cedar Tub & Keg 

1 Cedar Tub 

1/2 Gal Train oil 

1 Garden Rake 

20 Balls shoe Thread 

1 1/2 Gal Train oil 

1 Pair Stirrup Irons 

53 lbs nails 

20 lbs chalk 

1 Pitchfork 

2 oz Blk Lead 

4 1/2 lbs Eat(?) Logwood 

5 lbs shot 
5 lbs Rosin 
1 Pitchfork 
1 axe 

1 C Scythe 

2 lbs Rosin 

1 Bottle British oil 

2 mowing scythes 
1 four P Fork 

1 Cedar Bucket 
4 1/2 Doz Screws 
10 scythes 

2 mowing snathes 

1 Cedar Tub 

2 mowing ? 

2 Painted Buckets 

1/2 lb Sulphur 

63 1/2 Doz Screws 

1 [partial] lot mousetraps 

1 Lot Verdigris 

1 Tin Bucket 



173 



J.H. Nichols Inventory, 1856 (con't) 



1 mowing snath 

1 square 

14 1/4 Doz Screws 

3 Files 

5 papers Composition 

1 Pad lock 

1 Tin Bucket 

9 Gal Train oil 

1 Halter chain 

1 Lot wire 

1 Lot Flystone &c 

9 papers Flystone 

1 Four P Fork 

1 Lot horsepowders 

5 whet stones 

2 1/2 lbs Blk Lead 
1 Lot Carminative 

1 Tin Bucket 

Books and supplies 

2 Books 

2 lead pencils 

6 lead pencils 

5 Primmers (Primers?) 
1 Lot envelopes 

1 slate 

1 lot slate pencils 

slate pencils 

1 bot ink 

1 book 

4 pocket ink stand 
1 Lot slate Pencils 

1 pen holder 

3 box? lead 

2 bot ink 
1 bot ink 
1 Book 

4 lead pencils 
1 Slate 

6 copy Books 
1 Book 

5 inkstands 

1 geography & altsfatlas]? 

3 lead pencils 
1 Book 

1 lot slate pencils 

4 Lead Pencils 



1 Book 

4 lead pencils 

2 bot ink 

2 Dictionary 

1 Book 

2 Squir(??) 

3 Bot Ink 

2 stick sealing wax 

3 Books 

2 Books 

3 Dictionaries 
3 Books 

1 Quire note paper 

2 Quires note paper 

1 Lot Penholders 

2 Books 

1 Lot Book 

1 lot Books 

2 Blank Books 

3 bot ink 

1 lot slate pencils 

1 Book 

1 silver pencil 

1 Lot slate Pencils 

1 Piece P Paper 

1 inkstand 

6 books 
1 Book 
1 Book 

1 Piece P Paper 

3 sticks sealing wax 
pen & holder 

2 pen & holder 

5 Books 

1 Bottle Ink 

1 Piece P Paper 

1 Book 

1 Hymn Book 

1 Lot slate Pencils 

1 lot slate pencils 

2 Books 

1 set slate pencils 
1 Book 

4 Quires note paper 
1 Virginia Selection 

7 Boxes P (encil?) Points 
1 Dictionary 

6 sheets Tissue Paper 



174 



J.H. Nichols Inventory, 1856 (con't) 



4 copy Books 
1 Lot Books 
1 quire paper 

1 Lot Books 

4 Books 

5 Books 

2 Books 
1 Book 

1 Book mcii 
1 sheet P Paper 

3 1/2 Quires paper 

6 Books 

1 Blank Book 

2 Volumes F revolution 
2 Books 

6 Books 
6 Books 
1 [partial] lot books 

9 Quires paper 

1 Book 

2 Books 

10 Quires Paper 

10 sheets Tissue paper 

Store supplies 

1 pair scales 

1 Spittoon 

1 Shoe Box 

1 Box and contents 

1 bell 

1 sugar box 

2 Boxes & 4 Barrels 
1 Lot Boxes &c 

1 tight barrel 
1 Lot Barrels 
1 Box & contents 
1 Box & Barrels 

1 Lot measures 

2 Boxes & contents 
1 Box & contents 

1 Pair scales 

1 Lot measures & Funnel 

1 Box & contents 

1 Lot wrapping paper 

1 Box & contents 

2 Boxes & contents 

1 measure & Funnel 



1 Box 

1 Box & contents 
1 Box & contents 
1 Tea canister 
1 Box and contents 
1 stove ten plate 
1 Lot Boxes &c 
1 Barrel Boxes &c 
1 Barrel 

1 Lot scoups 

2 Lots boxes Keg &c 
1 Pair scales 

1 Pair Glove stretchers 

1 Inkstand 

1 Thermometer 

1 Lot measures & Funnel 

Personal items 

1 Pair mits & Tuck comb 
1 Piece Ribbon 
5 F E Collars 

3 Lead Pencils 
1 Shawl 

45 lbs Feathers 

19 1/4 lbs new Feathers 

1 Pair bedsteads 

1 tin Pitcher & Basin 

1 Dipper 

1 Carriage whip 

1 Brass kettle 

1 Kitchen Table 

1 case Drawers 

1 Iron spoon 

1 Pair bedsteads 

1 Pair Bedsteads 

1 underbed 

1 Bed cord 

1 lot Table Salt 

3 1/4 lbs rope 

1 measure string 

1 Trundle Bed & Bstead 

15 gal Flax seed oil 

23 1/2 lbs Powder 

1 Buggy bridle 

1 Buggy 

1 set Buggy harness 

1 Buggy cover 



175 



J.H. Nichols Inventory, 1856 (con't) 



oil can 

2 Quires paper 

1 Head Halter 

9 yds ticking 

1 Coffee pot & cake cutter 

1 Iron Candlestick 

1 1/2 yds white crape 

1 Iron shovel 

24 lbs Crushed Sugar 
68 lbs Bro Sugar 
ISafe 

2 Buckets 
1 waiter 

1 oil cloth 

2 Pairs Candlesticks 
1 Pair andirons 

20 yds matting 

1 Table 

1 Pair Preserve dishes 

lRug 

22 1/2 yds Carpeting 

1 Pair tongs & shovel 

2 stools 

1 Bureau 

1 Sugar Box 

1 Looking Glass 

1 Bridle 

1 Glass (looking) 

1 set knives & Forks 

1 wash stand 

6 L B (ladder back?) chairs 

1 washbowl & Pitcher 

13 tumblers 

1 Saucer & spoons 

1 tin bucket 

1 coffee mill 



1 Tin pan 

1 Cooking stove 

3 dishes 

1 washpan & spoon 

1 stone Jug 

3 milk pans & Tin pan 

2 Butcher knives 

1 Fire screen 

2 stools 

2 window curtains 

1 sugar bowl & cream cup 

2 Dishes 
2 Cruits 

1 Parlor stove 
1 Pair candlesticks 
20 yds Carpeting 
1 candlestand 
1 Clock 
1 mare 

Unknown 

1 Stu(?) 
1 Lot? 



176 



Advertisements - Harpers Ferry 

Virginia Free Press, 8/11/1859, page 1, column 2 

GREAT EXCITEMENT! 

Fresh and New styles of Spring and Summer Goods 

The undersigned is just receiving and opening a large and varied assortment of 
ladies and gents new styles DRESS GOODS-which together with his shoes, hats, 
notions, drugs, medicines &c, &c, renders his assortments complete, and varied, 
and will be sold as cheap as similar styles and qualities can be purchased anywhere 
in the valley. 

Tobacco, Cigars, Snuff, &c. 

He has also on hand and is receiving constantly additions of the choicest brands of 
tobacco together with a large assortment of the varied brands of Cigars, of his own 
manufacture; which added to the purchases of imported cigars, tenders his 
assortment in this line, complete-which will be sold at wholesale or retail in 
defiance of competition. 

Groceries and Queen sware 

His assortment of groceries and Queensware is large as well as complete, and will 
be sold at a small advance over cost. 

F.J. Conrad 

Corner High and Shenandoah St. 

Harpers Ferry, VA. 

April 21st, '59 



177 



Virginia Free Press, 11/25/1858, page 3, column 1 



Pressure in the Money Market! 
$5,000 to Deposit in safe investments!!! 

The subscriber having on hand and in store one of the best selected, largest and 
most general assortments of 

DRY GOODS, GROCERIES, BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, CARPETING, OIL 
CLOTHS, QUEENSWARE, GLASSWARE, BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 
NOTIONS, DRUGS, MEDICINES, CONFECTIONARY, &c, &c, 

all fresh and of the latest styles, he would take this method of calling the attention 
of his friends, the citizens of the town and county, and those in want, more 
particularly hereto. 

Not in a spirit of boasting or Humbuging, would say, that he is determined not to 
be undersold by any one. Owing to the tightness of the money market, he has 
purchased his Stocks from the very best houses, and on the most accommodating 
terms; a great portion for cash, and is thereby enabled to offer inducements to 
consumers. His assortment is varied and complete, as well as general. Call and 
see, inspect, and if pleased purchase. 

F.J. Conrad 

ALSO 

THE LARGEST STOCK OF TOBACCO! 

N.B. He has also on hand and will constantly keep (in the adjoining room) a large 
and complete assortment of the very choicest and most popular brands of 
TOBACCO, purchased alone from the Manufacturers and Commission Merchants, 
as also is constantly by the very best of hands, manufacturing the various brands of 
Cigars which, together with Pipes, Snuffs, matches, &c, &c, he is prepared to sell 
Wholesale and Retail on the most accommodating terms. 

F.J. Conrad 

Corner of High and Shenandoah Sts. 

Nov. 25, '58 Harpers Ferry, VA. 



178 



Virginia Free Press, 10/21/1858, page 3, column 2 

LATEST ARRIVAL 

WE HAVE NOW COMPLETED OPENING OUR STOCK OF 

Fall and Winter Goods, 

Which is fuller and ampler than any we have heretofore had the pleasure of 
exhibiting to the public. Our house is crowded with Goods, such as the NEWEST 
and LOVELIEST styles of Dress Goods, Shawls, Mantillas, Servant's Stripes; 
Brown and Bleached Cottons; Flannels; Linseys and Cassinets; of every description 
and price. The latter so low as to please all. 

BOOTS, SHOES AND HATS, 

an endless variety. 

GROCERIES 

of the nicest and purest, and at prices so low as to leave none a pretext for 
complaint. Our stock of Hardware in general, has met attention and will be found 
complete. In fine, we have in our store every article of general use; and we are 
prepared to sell at such prices as none may hope to rival. 

The public and our friends are cordially invited to call on us when in quest of 
bargains or of the best and most desireable Goods at the lowest prices. 

WALSH & BRO. 
Harpers Ferry, Oct. 1858 



179 



Virginia Free Press, 10/14/1858, page 3, column 1 



Thomas Rawlins 

Has just received, and has on hand for sale, cheap for cash, double-barrell guns, 
concentrated lye; manure, pitch and spade forks, hand and table bells; carriage, 
riding, and wagon whips, blind bridles, hatters, collars, riding bridles, martingales, 
stirrup leathers, saddles, saddle girths, surcingles, web reins, and leather bridle 
reins,; a large stock of door, pad, till and box locks; screws of all sizes, loose joint 
doors, spotter hinges; copper rivets, and barrs, corn meal, cloverseed and sand 
sives, Jackson's and Dixon's hand and tenant saws; Diston's best casteel crosscut 
saws; ivory handle and tea knives, silver-plated and [?] forks, table and teaspoons; 
plated stirrups, and bridle bits; 1 and 1/2 inch rope; with general assortment of 
groceries and Queenware which I would like to close out for I wish to quit the 
business. 

September 58 



Virginia Free Press, 10/21/1858, page 2, column 6 



Second Supply of Fall and Winter Goods 

In a few words we will say to those in want of goods that on the corner of 
Shenandoah and High Streets, Harpers Ferry, VA is the place to find cheap goods 
of all descriptions. Groceries you will find cheaper than any other house in town. 
Dry goods of all kinds, colors, and qualities, Queensware, hardware, boots and 
shoes, Hosiery, a general assortment, Bro. and bleached cottons, cassimers, 
casinettes, tweeds, and Kentucky jeans, Carpets very cheap, 4 4 oil cloths, a nice 
stock of blankets, nails by the kegg $4.25, a large lot of calicoes from 4 to 25 cents, 
wide calico 12 cents. 

All we ask is a call, we don't charge anything for showing our goods only when you 
take away. Thankful for past favours we hope by strict attention to business to 
have a continuance of the same. 

G.W. Legg 
Harpers Ferry 
Oct. 21, 1858 



180 



Virginia Free Press, 5/14/1857, page 4, column 4 

NEW GOODS 

For Fall and Winter 

Charles Johnson has just [?] opening his Fall and Winter stock of rich and [?] DRY 
GOODS embracing everything new and desirable in his line of business. 

Ladies Dress Goods: 

silks, marinos, French and Scotch plaids, cashmere, delaines, popplins, bombazine, 
crapes, chines 

EMBROIDERIES 

A very large stock in French and Scotch work of every description at very low 
prices. 

GLOVES AND HOSIERY 

Of the best maker in great variety. 

SHEETINGS AND SKIRTING 

Linen table cloths, towelings, and housekeeping goods generally, all of best fabrics. 

Clothes, cassimeres, vestings, [?] and drawers, etc. 

SHAWLS 

A very large stock of every pattern and style. 

SERVANTS GOODS 

Heavy goods for Servant's wear, Felted clothes, Kerseys, Lindseys, Osnabergs, 
Stripes, Checks, Brown Muslins, Blankets, & c, & c, 

Call early and [?] 

Harpers Ferry, October 23, 1856 



181 



Virginia Free Press, 4/20/1854, page 3, column 2 



JUST ARRIVED 
NEW AND CHEAP 

The undersigned has just returned from the Eastern Markets with the largest and 
most complete Stock of Goods he has ever offered at this place, all of which has 
been purchased on the very best possible terms and will be sold as low as any goods 
of the same quality can be in the Valley of Virginia consisting in part of the 
following articles viz: 

Cloths, Cassimeres, Tweeds 

Fancy Cassinets, at very low prices 

Silk, Satin, and Marseilles Vestings 

Italian Cloth and Summer do., 

A good assortment of Cotton Goods for Summer wear 

an assortment of Bleached and Brown Cottons; 

do do Osnaburg Cottons; 

Black, plain, striped, and figured Silks 

Tarltons, Illusions, and Sarcanets; 

Swiss, Cambric, and Jaconet Muslins 

Plain and figure Canton do; 

A large assortment of Calicoes and Ginghams; 

Berages and Berage de Laines, very cheap 

Lawns, Muslin &c, 

Irish Linen and Linen Tablecloths 

Linen Silk and Cambric Handkerchiefs 

Crape, Cashmere Shawls, of every variety 

French worked Collars, and Cuffs 

Dress Trimmings &c, 

Silk and Straw Bonnets, very cheap 

Artificial Flowers &c, and almost everything in the fancy way 

Ladies' Misses' and Children Shoes; 

Hats and Caps of every quality and price 

Also, a large stock of Groceries of the best quality consisting in part of~ 

Coffee, Sugar, Chocolate, Teas; 

Molasses, Syrups, Bacon, Salt, &c, 

Also, a good assortment of hardware 

Cutlery, Carpenter's Tools, &c, 

Waiters, Looking Glasses and Tinware 

A large stock of Queensware, &c, 

All of which will be sold on the very best terms. 

Those who desire to get good and cheap bargains are respectfully invited to call 

before purchasing elsewhere and judge for themselves. 

John G. Wilson 

Harpers Ferry, April 20, 1854 



182 



Virginia Free Press, 10/6/1853, page 3, column 2 



BARGAINS. NEW AND CHEAP GOODS. 

The undersigned has just returned from the East with a large and general 

assortment of goods, which has been purchased as low as any Goods in the Valley 

of Virginia for cash. The assortment consists in part of the following articles viz; - 

Super Black Cloths and Cassimeres; 

Super Fancy Cassinetts, at very low prices 

Silk Velvets, Satins, and Figured Silks, vestings; 

Plain Black, Changeable, Plaid, Striped, and Figured Silks; 

Delusions, Tarltons, Sarcenets; 

Swiss, Plain, and Figured Muslins; 

Cambric and Jacont do; 

Super Curtain Muslins, of various patterns; 

Ginghams and Calicoes, all patterns and prices; 

Ladies Super Linen Handkerchiefs; 

Gents Linen and silk do; 

Colored and Black Cravets; 

Crapes, Cashmeres, and Woolen Shawls, of various sizes and prices; 

Figured and Plain Bobinets; 

A large assortment of Dress Trimmings; 

Silk Laces, and Fringes, French worked Cotton; 

Ladies Kid, Silk and Lisle Thread Gloves; 

Gentlemen's Kid and Silk do; 

Ladies Silk, Cashmere, Lambswool, and Cotton Hose; 

Gentlemen's do; 

Super White, Red, and Yellow Flannels; 

Domestics of every description and color; 

Fine 1/4 and 12-4 Twilled Blankets; 

Servants Blankets; Canton Flannels; 

Silk and Fancy Bonnets; 

A large assortment of Fancy and Plain Ribbons; 

Artificial Flowers, Combs, Brushes, almost every article in the fancy way. 

China and Queensware. 

Among which are several handsome Tea Sets 

A good assortment of Hardware Cutlery 

Carpenter's Tools, &c, 

Waiters, Looking glasses, and Tin Ware. 

Groceries. 

I have a large stock of Groceries, all of which are of the best quality. 

Also a large lot of Ladies', Misses', and Children's Shoes, Silk Kossuth and Wool 

Hats, Caps of every description. Those who desire to get good bargains are 

respectfully invited to call soon and judge for themselves. 

John G. Wilson 

Harpers Ferry, WV, Oct, 6, 1853 



183 



Virginia Free Press, 5/6/1852, page 2, column 7 



NEW GOODS 

The subscriber after returning from the Eastern Cities is now receiving and 
opening a large stock of Spring and Summer Goods to which he respectfully invites 
the attention of the purchasers. His stock is heavier and more extensively assorted 
now than it has ever been, and his prices are reduced to meet the expectation of all 
in pursuit of bargains, which he pledges himself to give in Fancy Silks and 
Poplains, M. de Laines, black and white Lawns, emb. Lawns, Man. Ginghams, Irish 
Linen, bro. Linen Handkerchiefs, Parasols, Bonnets, and Trimming to suit, Gimps, 
Fringes, Laces, and Edgings; kid silk and cotton Gloves, cotton, lambswool, and Silk 
Hose, black cloth, black and fancy Cassimere, summer Tweeds, Gamboon, 
Cassinets, Kentucky Jeans, drill and domestic Cottons, brown and bleached 
Muslins, Sheetings, 10-4 yards Bed Ticking and Bagging, Cotton 

Yarns, & c, Hats and Caps, latest style and best quality; Ladies Shoes and Gaiters; 
Men's calf and hip Boots, Shoes fine and coarse. 

Bacon, Fish, Lard, Cheese, Rice, Sugar, Coffee, Teas, very fine Tobacco, &c, Locks 
and Hinges, Screws, Nails, Shoes Tacks and Thread, Carpenter's Tools, Towels, 
Cutlery very fine, Putty, Window Glass, tin and wood Wares, Queensware, and 
Glassware. 

Every branch of his extensive stock will be found complete and persons in want of 
seasonable goods at low prices, will be sure to meet them at his old stand. 

He cannot but avail himself of this occasion to return sincere thanks to his old tried 
friends and customers for their very liberal and unfailing encouragement, as well as 
to express the hope that his efforts to merit a continuation of it, may not be 
unavailing. 

Michael Doran 

Harpers Ferry, May 6, 1852-6t 



184 



Virginia Free Press, 9/25/1851, page 3, column 1 



NEW GOODS 

The subscriber after returning from Philadelphia is now receiving and opening a 
large stock of Fall and Winter Goods to which he respectfully invites the attention 
of the purchasers. His stock is heavier and more extensively assorted and general 
now than it has ever been, and his prices are reduced to meet the expectations of 
all in pursuit of bargains, which he pledges himself to give in -- 

Silk, cloth, [?] and [?] Shawls; silk and fancy Velvets; Irish Linens; Black and Fancy 
Silks; [?] Silks and Satins; needle worked Collars and pocket Handkerchiefs; 
Ribbons; Gimps Fringes; Gingham, Alpacas, half silk; Merinos, Plaids, Cashmere, 
Figured and Plain; Poplains, Lustre and a great variety of prints; (?) Cambrics, 
Swiss Tweeds, fancy lawns, and Netts, Laces and Edgings, Kid Gloves, Silk Gloves, 
and Mitts, White Flannels, Red and Yellow Flannels, Cotton Flannels, Drills, 
Domestic Cottons, Sheeting 30-4 yds, Bed Ticking and Bagging, black, blue and 
brown French and English Cloths; Ladies' black Cloths, Cashmeres, Satinets, 
Comforts, Black Gloves; Hats and Caps of every style and quality; Calf and Kip 
boots, Ladies' Shoes and Gaiters; Mens' Shoes, fine and coarse; blankets, cotton 
laps, cotton and woolen Yarn; Bacon, Sugar, Coffee, Rice, Cocoa, Raisins, Cheese, 
Crackers, Fine Tobacco, Teas, Leeks, Hinges, Screws, Carpenter's Tools, Trowels, 
Cutlery very fine, Shoe Thread and Tacks, Nails, Putty, and Window Glass, Tin 
and Wood Wares, Queensware and Glassware. 

Every Branch of his extensive stock will be found complete and persons in want of 
seasonable goods at low prices will be sure to find them at his old stand. 

He cannot but avail himself of this occasion to return sincere thanks to his old 
friends and customers for their very liberal and unfailing encouragement, as well as 
to express the hope that his efforts to merit a continuation of I may not be 
unavailing, 

Michael Doran 

Harpers Ferry, September 25, 1851-6t 



185 



Virginia Free Press, 4/4/1851, page 3, column 3 



NEW SPRING AND SUMMER GOODS 
Small Profits and Quick Returns 

The undersigned has just returned from the Eastern Markets with a new, full, and 
complete assortment of FASHIONABLE SPRING AND SUMMER GOODS which he 
has selected with the greatest possible care, and is determined to sell at the 
smallest remunerating profit. His stock comprises in part the following articles: 

Fine Black Cloth; Superior do, Ladies' Dress Goods; Berage de Laines; Superior do; 
striped and embroidered lawns; silk poplins; black satin, blue berage, plaid cambric; 
plaid [swiss?], summer green Alpacca; also a large assortment of trimmings [?], 
bonnets, Satin [?], Florence Braids, and a large and splendid stock of beautiful 
ribbons to suit. 

Fancy cassimeres; Merino do; Cassinets, black and blue cassinets, Kentucky Jeans; 
plaid Gambrons, striped Plaids, brown and bleached Muslins, 10-4, 6-4, 4-4, 3-4 
bleached sheeting, 6-4, 5-4, 4-4 brown sheeting. 

Boots, Shoes, Hats, Caps, Trunks, &c, &c, 

Mens and Boy's China pearl Braid Hats 

Black Mexican Hats 

Fancy Leghorn Hats 
" White Wool Tampico Hats 

Glazed Caps and an endless variety of Ladies' and Gentlemen's 
Shoes. 

Groceries and Hardware of every description; also Queensware and Woodware. 



The subscriber cannot allow the present opportunity to pass without returning his 
grateful thanks to his numerous friends for their kind patronage, and respectfully 
solicits a continuance of the same. 

Michael Doran 

Harpers Ferry, March 28, 1851 



186 



Virginia Free Press, 10/18/1850, page 3, column 2 



NEW AND CHEAP. FALL & WINTER GOODS. 

The undersigned has just returned from the Eastern Markets with a complete 
assortment of Fall and Winter Goods which have been selected with great care, and 
will be sold at small profits, accepting the old adage that the nimble six pence is 
better than the slow shilling. His stock consists in part of the following articles: 

Cotton Cloth for Ladies' Dress; 

Embroidered do;, (all colors, a beautiful article) 

Merinoes assorted colors; 

Alpacas, (figured and plain,) a good assortment of Ladies' Shawls, all patterns and 

sizes; Ladies' Gloves of superior quality, Silk and Kid 

Gentlemen's Buckskin Beaver and Kid Gloves; 

A beautiful assortment of Fall and Winter Bonnets 

Superior Trimmings for Bonnets; 

Jenny Lind Trimmings for Dresses, all colors; 

A large assortment of Dress Silks, all colors, and cheap; 

Fall and Winter Calicoes, beautiful patterns and very cheap; 

Laces, Edgings, Veils, Crapes, Illusions Flowers, &c, 

Superior French Cloths; very low; 

Cassimeres (French & American) assorted colors and very cheap; 

Cassinets all prices; 

Lindseys very cheap; 

A large stock of domestics very low; 

White and colored Flannels, very fine and cheap; 

10-4, 11-4, 12-4, 13-4 Whitney Blankets, 25 per cent lower than last year; 

A good assortment of Hosiery; 

A large assortment of Ladies', Misses', and Children's Shoes; 

A large assortment of China, Glass, and Queensware; 

hardware 
A complete stock of Tin Ware; 
Gentlemen's Hats, Fall Fashion, very superior; 
Wool Hats, very low; 
Santa Fe Water Proof Hats, 50 cts.; 
A complete stock of Groceries; 
Flour, Bacon, and in fact every article that is usually kept in a retail store. 

His friends and the public are most respectfully invited to call and examine his 
stock before making their purchases, as he makes no charge for showing his goods. 

John G. Wilson 

Opposite the Arsenal, Shenandoah St., Harpers Ferry, WV 

Oct., 18, 1850 



187 



Virginia Free Press, 2/21/1850, page 3, column 2 



...now opening a large addition of new goods to my former stock. My purchases are 
made on terms which enable me to undersell most of those in the trade. My stock 
is now very complete and I invite all who want to purchase GOOD AND CHEAP 
GOODS, to call at my store. I have a hue supply of Domestic Dry Goods, such as 
Heavy Brown Cottons, Drillings, Bleached Cotton, Checks, Ginghams, Plaids, 
Ticking &c. 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS AND CAPS 

With everything in the hardware line, such as Locks, Screws, Augers, Hinges, 
Nails, Cast Steel, &c, &c, 

But to my groceries I call the particular attention to those wanting prime Rio 
Coffee, N.O. Porta Rico Loaf and Lump Sugar, Pepper, Allspice, Mustard, Herring, 
Mackerel, Cod Fish, &c. 

Michael Doran 

Harpers Ferry, Feb. 21, 1850 



188 



FURNISHINGS PLAN (General Store) 

Overview 

The furnishings plan for the general store is based on the sale bill of the property 
of Thomas Dorrell, deceased, taken on March 6, 1854. This document was 
selected as the basis for the plan because the date is very close to the interpretive 
period of the exhibit, the list of items is complete and comprehensive, and the 
quantity of items seemed appropriate for the size of the store that is to be 
historically furnished. 

Dorrell carried a wide assortment of food, housewares, clothing, dry goods, and 
hardware. Spices, coffee, cured meats, candy, tobacco, liquor, sugar, and other 
staples make up the bulk of the food in the inventory. Dorrell may have sold 
some fresh produce taken in trade from his customers which does not appear in 
the inventory. Housewares include dishes, cutlery, glassware, lighting supplies, 
cleaning supplies, and cookware. In terms of clothing, the inventory lists mostly 
boots, shoes, hats, caps, and accessories, such as handkerchiefs, gloves, and hose. 
Dorrell stocked a wide variety of dry goods from cheap jean to silk. The hardware 
stock consisted of small tools, nails, screws, locks, and knives. 

The layout of the store is based on period illustrations. When entering the store, 
dry goods were generally displayed on the left and food on the right, with 
housewares against the back wall. However, the unusually large number of doors 
and windows in the side walls of Building 35 necessitated a slight alteration of 
this arrangement. 



Interpretive Objectives and Operating Plan 

According to the Interpretive Prospectus, the historically furnished general store 
should give visitors "some understanding of commercial and domestic history" 196 
while tying in to the major themes of the park. "The general store merchandise 
will relate to the type of clientele in this 'government town' and to the types of 
transportation that would have brought it here: canal and railroad." 197 The 
furnishings plan contains many examples of goods manufactured in larger towns 
and brought to Harpers Ferry by boat or train. The store also displays produce 
supposedly taken by the merchant in trade for manufactured items. Some of the 
items for sale, such as the extracts and spices, have very sophisticated packages. 
Other merchandise, like flour and molasses, are displayed as they would have 



NPS, Interpretive Prospectus, p. 23. 
Ibid., p. 24. 

189 



been in the eighteenth century. Thus, the general store stands on the brink of 
modern marketing and shows an interesting mix of earlier and later forms of 
packaging and distribution. 

The interpretation of the general store is similar to that of the ready-made 
clothing store since the Civil War acted as a watershed in both industries. Just as 
the Civil War provided incentive and opportunity to fit and clothe many men with 
ready-made garments, it also necessitated the provision of millions of men with a 
wide variety of foods packaged to withstand the rigors of long transportation and a 
variety of climates. The Civil War also introduced millions of men to the 
convenience and palatability of canned and packaged foods, breaking down 
resistance to the unfamiliarity of such items. After the war, manufacturers who 
had provisioned the army during the war were set up to provision the home. 
Improved rail transportation networks in the late 1860s and 1870s also 
contributed to the increase in the use of packaged foods. 

Therefore, the interpretation of the general store looks both forward and 
backward. Many of the items and marketing techniques date back to the 
eighteenth century. However, the appearance of bottled and packaged foods and 
ready-made clothing presage the explosion of manufactured goods that will become 
available virtually nationwide in the last decades of the nineteenth century. 

The general store will be open to the visitor during regular park hours. The store 
is accessible to individuals with mobility limitations through the rear door that 
opens onto the backyard ramp. During peak visitation, a costumed interpreter 
will staff the exhibit. Either male or female interpreters are appropriate in a 
general store. During the off-season, barriers will be installed at the front and 
rear doors of the shop to allow visitors to step inside and view the interior. 
Freestanding, moveable panels located behind the barriers will interpret the scene 
to the visitor. The conceptual plan for the panels appears after the List of 
Furnishings. 



190 




s 

13 

5- 

a 



Recommended Furnishings 

General Store, room 101, Building 35. 

Object and Location Documentation 



CABINETS, with shelves, 4 
(2 along west wall, one each 
along east and south walls) 



COUNTERS, 3 (in front of 
each shelving unit, except 
one at south end of west 
wall) 

STOOLS, 6 (two behind 
counter along east wall, two 
in front of south end of east 
counter, one behind each 
counter on south and west 
sides 

COUNTER SCALE (at 
north end of west counter) 

SCALES and WEIGHTS 
(on south counter) 

HAND MIRROR (on east 
counter near south end) 



PAPER, wrapping, in 
sheets (one pile on south 
end of east counter and one 
pile centrally located on 
counter along west wall) 

STRING HOLDERS, with 
string (near piles of paper) 



SCISSORS, 3 pair (small 
pairs on counters near 
string holders, large pair on 
east counter) 



Figures 24, 28, 30, 29, 26, 
and 38. 



Figures 24, 28, 30, 29, 26, 
and 38. 



Figure 29. 



Dorrell inventory; figures 
25, 26, and 38. 

Dorrell inventory; figures 
30, 32. 

A mirror would be required 
for the convenience of 
customers purchasing hats. 

Paper was traditionally 
used to wrap packages. 
Dorrell inventory. 



String was required to tie 
customer's packages. 
Dorrell inventory; figure 36. 

Scissors were commonly 
used to cut string and 
cloth. 



Recommendation 

Evaluate cabinets for 
possible use. Reproduce 
additional cabinets as 
needed. 

Examine existing counters 
for possible use. Reproduce 
additional counters as 
needed. 

Acquire reproductions. 



Acquire period piece. 
Acquire period piece. 
Acquire period piece. 



Acquire modern paper in 
appropriate size and 
weight. 



Acquire period string 
holders and modern string. 



Acquire period pieces or 
reproductions. 



192 



General Store, room 101, continued 

Object and Location 



STOVE, with stovepipe 
(center of room with 
stovepipe running into east 
wall above fireplace) 

SANDBOX (underneath 
stove) 

SHOVEL and TONGS 
(near stove) 

FIREWOOD, 6 pieces 
(on floor near stove) 

CHAIRS, plank bottom, 4 
(around stove) 

SPITTOONS, 2 (on floor at 
intersection of south and 
west counters and near 
stove) 

PRINTS, framed (on north 
wall next to door) 

PRINTS, unframed 
(attached to shelving 
around room) 

BASKET with EGGS (on 
counter along west wall) 



BUSHEL BASKET, with 
potatoes (in front of west 
counter) 

BARRELS, 6 (two in front 
of west counter; four in 
northeast corner) 



WHISKEY BARREL, (in 
northwest corner) 



Documentation 

Dorrell inventory; figures 
37 and 38. 



Figures 28 and 38. 



Dorrell inventory. 



Wood is required to operate 
the stove 

Figures 24 and 28. 



Dorrell inventory. 



Dorrell inventory ("2 
pictures and frames"). 

Dorrell inventory ("6 
pictures"). 



Figure 28. Harpers Ferry 
stores commonly accepted 
farm produce in trade. 

Dorrell inventory. 



Dorrell inventory lists 
barrels of mackerel, 
herring, salt, crackers, 
flour, one "lot of pickels,' 
and a "lot of meat." 

Dorrell inventory 



Recommendation 



Acquire period piece 



Acquire reproduction 



Acquire period pieces 



Acquire fumigated wood for 
display 

Acquire reproductions 



Acquire reproductions 



Acquire period prints in 
reproduction frames 

Acquire reproductions 



Acquire period basket and 
imitation eggs 



Acquire period basket and 
imitation potatoes 

Acquire reproductions 



Acquire reproduction 



193 



General Store, room 101, continued 
Object and Location Documentation 



CRATE (supporting 
whiskey barrel) 



PITCHER (on top of 
whiskey barrel) 

FUNNEL, tin (on top of 
whiskey barrel) 

DEMIJOHN (on top of 
whiskey barrel) 

LARD, in keg (on floor next 
to whiskey barrel in 
northwest corner) 

COFFEE, in bag (on floor 
next to whiskey barrel in 
northwest corner) 

RICE, in bag (on floor next 
to whiskey barrel in 
northwest corner) 

ONION SEED, bag (on 
floor next to whiskey barrel 
in northwest corner) 

SCOOPS, 2; one set each of 
dry and liquid measures 
(behind west counter) 

DRIED FISH, Sole, 5, 
large, total weight=40 lbs. 
(hanging from ceiling 
behind west counter) 

HAMS, 4, and 
SHOULDERS, 5 (hanging 
from ceiling behind west 
counter) 

NETTLES, 3 bunches 
(hanging from ceiling 
behind west counter) 



Whiskey barrel needs to be 
supported off of floor in 
order to be tapped. 

Figure 24. 



Figure 24. 
Figure 24. 
Dorrell inventory. 

Dorrell inventory; figure 41. 

Dorrell inventory; figure 29. 

Dorrell inventory. 

Dorrell inventory; figure 40. 

Dorrell inventory; figure 32. 



Dorrell inventory; figures 
24, 29, and 39. " 



Dorrell inventory. 



Recommendation 
Acquire reproduction 

Acquire reproduction 
Acquire reproduction 



Acquire reproduction or 
period piece 

Acquire reproduction 



Acquire reproduction 



Acquire reproduction 



Acquire reproduction 



Acquire period pieces 



Acquire reproductions 



Acquire reproductions 



Acquire reproductions 



194 



General Store, room 101, continued 
Object and Location Documentation 



SAGE, 1 bunch (hanging 
from ceiling behind west 
counter) 

BARREL, with 8 BROOMS 
(at south end of west 
cabinets) 

KEG, for nails (on floor in 
front of south counter) 

WHEELBARROW (on floor 
near nail keg) 

SPADES, 4, and HOE, 1 
(leaning against counter 
near nail keg) 

COMFORTERS, 7 (on line 
strung from ceiling on west 
side) 

FLYERS, PATENT 
MEDICINE, asst. 
(throughout) 

BROOM and DUST PAN 

(against east wall) 

LAMPS, hanging, 5 (above 
counters) 

CLOCK, long eight day 
(northeast corner) 



Dorrell inventory. 

Dorrell inventory; figure 24. 

Dorrell inventory; figure 24. 

Dorrell inventory. 

Dorrell inventory; figure 24. 

Dorrell inventory; figure 28. 

Figures 28 and 30. 

Figures 24 and 29. 
Figure 30. 
Dorrell inventory. 



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195 



General Store, room 101, continued 
Object and Location Documentation 



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The following items will be placed on the shelves along the west wall. 



PITCHERS, 11 

TABLEWARE: 

dishes, 8 

plates, 60 (8 glass) 

mugs, 41 

cream mugs, 2 

cups and saucers, 12 pair 

cups, 98 

bowls, 55 

JARS, stoneware, 3 

JUGS, 7 

CASTORS, 3 

TEAPOTS, 7 

TUMBLERS, 44 

CHAMBER POTS, 6 

WASHBOWL and 
PITCHER 

SALT SETS, 5 
and SALTS, 20 



Dorrell inventory; figure 28. 
Dorrell inventory; figure 28. 



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inventory. 



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SHAVING GLASSES, 3 


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DECANTERS, 10 pr. 


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WAITERS, 5 


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CANDLES, 117 boxes 


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GLASS LAMPS, 2 


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SCONCE 


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196 



General Store, room 101, continued 

Object and Location Documentation 

KETTLE, iron 

POT, iron, large 

FLATIRONS, cast iron, 3 

SIEVES, 2 

GRATERS, 5 

KNIVES, table, 8 

KNIVES, butcher, 6 

SPOONS, 3 1/2 doz. 

SOAP, 150 lbs, in cakes 

SOAP FAT, in covered 
bucket 

STARCH, 11 V2 lbs. 

BLANKETS, 10 

TOWELS, linen, 3 

CARPET, 1 
and RUG, 1 

BASKET, 1 large 

CANISTERS, 23 

TEA, 30- 1 lb. packages 

COFFEE, 30 1 lb. tins 



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197 



General Store, room 101, continued 
Object and Location 



SEASONINGS: 
allspice, 15 lbs. (in cans) 
pepper, 26 cans or jars 
ginger, 14 lbs. (in boxes) 
baking soda, 11 lbs. in cans 
nutmegs, 1 3/4 lbs. 
mustard, 8 bottles 
cloves, 2 bottles 
baking powder, 1 paper 

MOLASSES, in small keg 
with spigot 

PITCHER, tin (near 
molasses keg) 

FUNNEL, tin (near 
molasses keg) 

BROWN SUGAR, 350 lbs., 
in cones and boxes 

DESK, tabletop 

LEDGER 

BOTTLES, 24, of 
peppermint (12), 
castor oil (11), 
and cod liver oil (1). 

GLASS JARS, 11, with 
assorted CANDY 

JAR, with PRUNES 

BOTTLES, stoneware, 6 oz. 
and 8 oz. 

BOTTLES, stoneware, 94 

MALAGA WINE, 20 gal. 



Documentation 



Dorrell inventory. 



Dorrell inventory. 

Figure 24. 

Figure 24. 

Dorrell inventory; figures 
25, 40, and 41. " 

Figure 28. 

Dorrell inventory; figure 24. 

Dorrell inventory. 



Dorrell inventory; figure 24. 

Dorrell inventory. 
Dorrell inventory. 

Dorrell inventory. 
Dorrell inventory. 



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198 



General Store, room 101, continued 

Object and Location 

FRENCH BRANDY, 35 gal. 

RUM, 35 gal. 

CHOCOLATE, 5 bars 

PALM NUTS, 4 lbs. 



Documentation 



TOBACCO, 8 twists and 
150 lbs. in boxes, tins, and 
packages 

PIPES, 144 in boxes 

CIGARS, 4 boxes 

SNUFF, 1 bottle 



Dorrell inventory. 
Dorrell inventory. 
Dorrell inventory. 
Dorrell inventory. 
Dorrell inventory. 



Dorrell inventory. 

Dorrell inventory; figure 41 
[secars]. 

Dorrell inventory. 



The following items will be placed on the shelves along the east wall. 



FABRIC, asst. bolts, 125 

BOXES, 31, small, 
asst. sizes for: 
buttons, 11 
pins, 1 
tape, 3 

skeins of silk, 2 
thread, 1 
thimbles, 2 
needles, 2 
knitting needles, 1 
cord, 1 

hooks and eyes, 6 
lace, 1 

SEWING SILK, 2 doz. 
skeins 

BUTTONS, assorted, 2 doz. 

THIMBLES, 2 

PATTERNS, vest, 5 



Dorrell inventory. 
Dorrell inventory. 



Dorrell inventory. 

Dorrell inventory. 
Dorrell inventory. 
Dorrell inventory. 



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199 



General Store, room 

Object and Location 

WHALEBONE, one gross 

BOXES, 33, large, for: 
Shoes, 25 
Boots, 8 

BOOTS, 8 pr. 

SHOES, 10 pr. 

BOXES, 33, small, for: 
Handkerchiefs, 5 
Neckerchiefs, 1 
Hose, 4 
Socks, 2 
Gloves, 5 
Suspenders, 4 
Combs, 8 
Purses, 2 
Drawers, 1 
Shoestrings, 1 

BOXES, 4, medium, for: 
Shirts, 2 
Shawls, 2 

HATBOXES, 10 

HATS, 15 (7 straw, 4 
beaver, 4 silk) 

CAPS, 12 

PANTS, 27 pr. 

COATS, 24 

VESTS, 49 

GLOVES, 5 pr. 

COMBS, 6 pair (3 fine; 3 
side) 

SHIRTS, 4 



101, continued 

Documentation 
Dorrell inventory. 
Dorrell inventory; figure 30. 

Dorrell inventory. 
Dorrell inventory. 
Dorrell inventory. 



Dorrell inventory. 

Dorrell inventory. 
Dorrell inventory. 

Dorrell inventory. 
Dorrell inventory. 
Dorrell inventory. 
Dorrell inventory. 
Dorrell inventory. 
Dorrell inventory. 

Dorrell inventory. 



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200 



General Store, room 101, continued 
Object and Location Documentation 

HANDKERCHIEFS, 25 Dorrell inventory. 

BEADBAG, 1 Dorrell inventory. 

PURSES, 3 Dorrell inventory. 

COLOGNE, 4 bottles Dorrell inventory. 



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SHAWLS, 2 



Dorrell inventory. 



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HOSE, 12 pr. 

SUSPENDERS, 5 

CARPET BAGS, 6; 
PORT MONIES, 2; and 
TRUNKS, 5 (on top of 
shelves) 

RAZOR STROPS, 4 

POCKETBOXES, 9 

SLIPPERS, 5 pr. 

MARBLES, 2 doz., in 
leather pouch 

UMBRELLAS, 12 and 
PARASOLS, 2 (in stand 
behind counter) 

UMBRELLA STAND 
(behind counter) 

BRUSH, counter (on 
counter) 



Dorrell inventory. 
Dorrell inventory. 
Dorrell inventory. 



Dorrell inventory. 

Dorrell inventory. 
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Dorrell inventory. 

Dorrell inventory. 



Required for display of 
umbrellas and parasols. 

Dorrell inventory. 



The following items will be placed on the shelves along the south wall, 
placement of each item. 



LETTER PAPER, 9 1/2 
quires 



Dorrell inventory. 



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201 



General Store, room 101, continued 

Object and Location Documentation 

SLATE PENCILS, 10 Dorrell inventory. 

PENCILS, lead, 11 Dorrell inventory. 

PENS, 2 boxes Dorrell inventory. 



ENVELOPES, 2 packages 

WAFERS, 1 box 

PAPER, 30 reams 

PENKNIVES, 16 

BOOKS, 19, including 
Testament, 1; History of the 
World, 1 two- vol. set; 
Robinson Crusoe; and 15 
others 

BOXES, small, 4, for 
shears, pad locks, hinges, 
and cork 

CURRY COMB, 1 

BLACKING BRUSHES, 9 

BLACKING, 15 bottles 

TACKS, 75 papers 

INDIGO, 2 lbs. in small 
packages 

MASON'S LINES, 7 

SHOT, 72 lbs., in bags 

GUNPOWDER, 15 lbs. 

PERCUSSION CAPS, 4000 



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Dorrell inventory. 
Dorrell inventory. 



Dorrell inventory. 

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202 



General Store, room 101, continued 



Object and Location 

FLINTS, 3 packages 

SHOT GUN, 1 and 
PISTOL, 1 

MATCHES, 2 gross, in 
boxes 

GLASS, 8" x 10", one box 

SALTPETER, 25 lbs. 

BUCKETS, 10; 
TUB, 1 

BED CORDS, 18 

SADDLE BAGS, one pair 

ROPE, one coil 

CHAIN, length 

HARDWARE: 

Axes, 2 
Saws, 2 
Peg Cutter, 1 
Tap Borer, 1 

These objects will be placed in the east display window. 

Dorrell inventory; figure 39. 



Documentation 
Dorrell inventory. 
Dorrell inventory. 

Dorrell inventory. 

Dorrell inventory. 
Dorrell inventory. 
Dorrell inventory. 

Dorrell inventory. 
Dorrell inventory. 
Dorrell inventory. 
Dorrell inventory. 
Dorrell inventory. 



LARGE BOXES, 2, labeled 
"tea" and "coffee" 

BOTTLES, 4 large 

SMALL KEGS, 2, labeled 
"molasses" 

CANISTERS, 12, (4 each 
labeled "baking soda", 
"allspice", and "ginger") 

HAMS, 3; and 
SHOULDERS, 3 (hanging 
in window) 



Dorrell inventory; figure 39. 
Dorrell inventory; figure 39. 

Dorrell inventory; figure 39. 
Dorrell inventory; figure 39. 



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203 



General Store, room 101, continued 

Object and Location Documentation 

SACK, labeled "salt" Dorrell inventory. 

BOTTLES, stoneware, 12 Dorrell inventory. 



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The following items will be placed in the west display window. 



DRY GOODS, 3 pieces, 
each 6 yards long (hanging 
on wire strung across 
window) 

HATS, 4, and CAPS, 4 (on 
hatstands) 

Large BOX, for shoes 

BOOTS, 1 pr. 

SHOES, 1 pr. 

Large BOLT OF CLOTH, 
with paper label 

CAT, replica 



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Dorrell inventory; figure 30. 
Dorrell inventory. 
Dorrell inventory. 
Dorrell inventory; figure 43. 

Figures 24 and 37. 



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These items are to be placed on the sidewalk along Shenandoah Street, outside the door to 
Building 35: 



BARRELS, 2 
KEGS, 2 
BUTTER PAIL, 1 



Dorrell inventory; figure 39. 
Dorrell inventory; figure 39. 
Figure 39. 



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204 



Concept for Interpretive Panels 

These interpretive panels will explain the transitional nature of this store. Much 
of the inventory is similar to stores from the early nineteenth century. However, 
some products like spices and extracts foreshadowed the packaging revolution to 
take place after the Civil War. The Civil War played a major role in packaging 
history, since it necessitated the provision of millions of men with a wide variety 
of foods packaged to withstand the rigors of long transportation and a variety of 
climates. As a direct result of the war, the manufacturing of packaged foods, like 
the manufacturing of ready-made clothing, was pursued on a large scale. 
Additionally, millions of soldiers were introduced to canned and packaged food, 
helping to break down resistance to this new way of eating. 

Other points to be made if space permits include: 

1. Fresh produce and meat were sometimes taken in trade from customers and 
sold in general stores, but most people bought these items from the weekly market 
in town and only bought staples from the store. 

2. A wide variety of dry goods and housewares were available in town because of 
the trains and canal, which connected Harpers Ferry with all of the major Eastern 
cities. 



Possible illustrations: 

— The Long Bill, figure 24. 

— Billhead, H.L. Vervalin & Co., figure 25. 

— Interior of a Country Store, figure 26. 

— Village Post Office, figure 28. 

— An outside market as seen in Taylor's With Sheridan Up the Shenandoah 
Valley in 1864: Leaves from a Special Artist's Sketchbook and Diary [The James E. 
Taylor Sketchbook], p. 31. 



205 



PART III 
STIPES' BOARDING HOUSE 



ANALYSIS OF HISTORIC OCCUPANCY 

Both government buildings and private residences served a variety of military 
functions during the Civil War occupation of Harpers Ferry. During the Civil 
War, Building 34/35 was a 2 1/2-story brick house with a one story kitchen 
attached at the southwest corner. The house had been occupied from 1818 to 1858 
by the master armorers employed at the Harpers Ferry Armory. For a brief 
period, from 1858-1859, the armory's paymaster's clerk occupied the building. 
Building 34/35 was probably vacant when the Civil War broke out. 

During the Civil War, Building 36, immediately to the east of Building 34/35, was 
"a favorite Army Headquarters from the opening of hostilities." 198 Because of its 
proximity to headquarters, Building 34/35 was a logical place for military officers 
to board. In 1865, Brig. Gen. Edward D. Ramsay stated that Building 34/35 was 
"occupied as quarters for Officers." 199 However, in 1864, James Taylor, a 
newspaperman, described this building as the Stipes' Hotel, or boarding 
house. 200 

James E. Taylor was employed as a visual reporter for Frank Leslie's Illustrated 
Newspaper during his five months' sojourn in the northern Shenandoah Valley in 
1864. The contents of Taylor's The James E. Taylor Sketchbook are, in the 
author's words, "the amplification of a Diary I kept and Sketches I made while 
accompanying General Philip H. Sheridan in the capacity of a Special Artist 
during his Campaign in the Shenandoah Valley, in 1864. " 201 Sketches by Taylor 
and other "special artists" were commissioned by newspapers to illustrate the 
written stories submitted by the correspondents. These sketches served as the 
only immediate graphic illustrations of the war for the rest of the populace, since 
the technology for mass producing photographs did not exist at that time. 

Intending to join the Valley Army near Harpers Ferry, Taylor arrived in town for 
the first time on Tuesday, August 9, 1864. He was immediately approached by a 



IM Taylor, The James E. Taylor Sketchbook, p. 30. 

199 Ramsay to Dyer, as quoted in NPS, "Historic Building Report, Part II, Historical Data Section. ..The Samuel Annin 
House," p. 25. 

200 Taylor, The James E. Taylor Sketchbook, p. 30. 

201 Ibid., p. 3. 

206 



"runner," sent out to drum up business, who conducted him to a local hotel run by 
Mrs. Cornelia Stipes. Taylor occupied a room under the eaves on the top floor of 
Stipes' boarding house. 202 Taylor's sketch of his room appears in this section. 
His drawing of the exterior in which he identifies Mrs. Stipes' boarding house as 
Building 35 appears in the illustrations section (figure 1). 

Taylor relates that "Mrs. Stipes catered to sojourners at the Ferry to the extent of 
table board and lodging, not from choice but necessity caused by her husband's 
business reverses owing to the War, and his inability to catch on again, when it 
fell to the lot of Madam to entertain transients to keep the wolf from the 
door." 203 Taylor must have gotten his facts wrong in this case, since Mrs. 
Cornelia Stipes was widowed in 1840 when her husband Thomas died of 
consumption, 204 and she is listed as the head of household in every census from 
1840 until her death between 1880 and 1883. 205 Research efforts have failed to 
locate a formal agreement granting Mrs. Stipes permission to run a boarding 
house in a government building. We know that the provost marshal routinely 
granted licenses to local merchants to operate businesses in vacant buildings in 
town. 206 Keeping borders was a common way for widows to earn a living in 
Harpers Ferry, and Mrs. Stipes may have applied informally for permission to use 
an empty building. Seven of the eight people listed as boarding house keepers in 
the 1860 Harpers Ferry census are women. 

Mrs. Stipes was not listed as a boarding house keeper in the 1860 census, 
although at least one apparently unrelated person, a 25 year old male machinist, 
was living in her household. 207 Also living in her household in 1860 and 
presumably in 1864 as well were Mrs. Stipes' three daughters, Anna, Martha, and 
Medora. Taylor particularly remembered Medora, "a tall stately fluffy-haired 
blonde," 208 who was about nineteen years old in 1864. At the time of the 1870 



202 Ibid., pp. 29-30. 

203 Ibid., p. 30. 



204 



Virginia Free Press, February 20, 1840, p. 3, col. 3. 



208 U.S. Bureau of the Census, Jefferson County, Virginia: Sixth Census, 1840, p. 243; Seventh Census, 1850, p. 409B; 
Eighth Census, 1860, p. 198. Jefferson County, West Virginia: Ninth Census, 1870, p. 458; Tenth Census, 1880, p. 3. 

206 Banes, History of the Philadelphia Brigade, p. 124. 

207 U.S. Bureau of the Census, Eighth Census of the United States (1860), Jefferson County, Virginia, pp. 198-199. Six other 
people are listed in the same dwelling house as Cornelia Stipes but are enumerated as a different family. 

208 Taylor, The James E. Taylor Sketchbook, p. 43. 

207 



census, Medora is listed as having two children, aged 5 and 3, and is living with 
her mother. 209 

In The James E. Taylor Sketchbook, Taylor mentions that a coterie of 
newspapermen were staying at Stipes' boarding house. 

On reaching the house, I found on the porch two new arrivals by the morning train who, 
much to my satisfaction, proved to be newspaper men, with whom I was not slow in 
brushing up an acquaintance. 

The newspaperman gathered information and exchanged leads with each other 
during mealtimes and while gathered on the front stoop. 211 A group of them 
decided to "join forces" and "proceed to the front without delay." 212 

Taylor left to join the army at the front the day after he arrived in Harpers Ferry. 
He returned to Stipes' boarding house many times during the next five months, 
frequently obtaining the same room. While in the area he drew many sketches of 
Harpers Ferry and the surrounding countryside. 

On December 20, 1864, Taylor left Harpers Ferry after receiving instructions from 
his employer to cover Benjamin F. Butler's Army of the James positioned at 
Bermuda Hundred, Virginia. 

In April of 1865, Mrs. Stipes purchased property "nearly opposite the Presbyterian 
Church," 213 and may have gone into the boarding house business whole- 
heartedly at that point, since she is listed as a boarding house keeper in the 1870 
census. 214 Perhaps she moved out of Building 34/35 at this time, because by 
July 1865, Building 34/35 was described as officers' quarters. 



209 U.S. Bureau of the Census, Ninth Census of the United States (1870), Jefferson County, West Virginia, p. 17. 

210 Taylor, The James E. Taylor Sketchbook, p. 41. 

211 Ibid., pp. 41-43, p. 215, and p. 250. 

212 Ibid., p. 41. 

213 Deed Book 1, p. 156, JCC. The reference to the property being across from the church appears in an 1866 deed in which 
Cornelia Stipes transfers this property to her daughter Ann Stipes (Deed Book 1, p. 359, JCC). 



Ninth Census of the United States (1870), Jefferson County, West Virginia. 

208 



EVIDENCE OF ORIGINAL FURNISHINGS for James Taylor's Room 

Discussion of Sources 

The source for this furnished exhibit is Taylor's The James E. Taylor Sketchbook, 
which contains both a written description and a sketch of Taylor's accommodation 
in Stipes' boarding house. Taylor states that his sketchbook is an "amplification" 
of a diary and sketchbook he kept during the Civil War. He reworked his 
sketchbook in the 1890s, forty years after the events he is describing took place. 
Taylor himself admits that 

Nothing is more untrustworthy than personal recollections after the events they 
endeavor to recall have receded a third or more of a century into the past unless 

QIC 

culled from positive data secured at the time. 

Taylor does not say how much of the text or how many of the drawings were 
added by him in the 1890s. 



Excerpts from Taylor's Sketchbook 

p. 30 Under the 'boy's' pilotage, I land at 'Hotel de Stipes,' two squares south on 

Shenandoah Street and a brief interview with Madam ends in my arranging for an 
indefinite stay. 

Mrs. Stipes catered to sojourners at the Ferry to the extent of table board and 
lodging, not from choice but necessity caused by her husband's business reverses 
owing to the War, and his inability to catch on again, when it fell to the lot of 
madam to entertain transients to keep the wolf from the door. 

I am at once conducted to my quarters, a sky parlor under the slanting roof, the 
only available room unoccupied, but make no 'kick,' thankful at being supplied at 
all, considering the demand at this time by correspondents, army contractors, and 
sutlers for lodgings. 

After preparing my toilet, I descend to the dining room and discuss dinner.... 



Taylor, The James K. Taylor Sketchbook, p. 3. 

209 



p. 215 The Madam is next sought and I have the satisfaction of assignment to my former 
'sky parlor' fortunately for me, unoccupied, where I put in the half hour to the 
dinner summons in preparing my toilet, as I was considerably travel-stained. 



Stripped to the buff, for the thermometer ranged in the nineties in my loft, I 
proceed to put a number of special subjects in ship-shape amid perspiration oozing 
from my pores without a let-up.... 



p. 247 It is of course, unnecessary to explain that Tom's wants were first attended to, 
which was a matter of little trouble, Stipes' having a stable. 



210 



J 







Interior of James E. Taylor's Room on the top floor of Stipes' boarding house 
sketched by Taylor. Found in Taylor's The James E. Taylor Sketchbook, p. 215. 



211 



FURNISHINGS PLAN (James Taylor room) 

Overview 

James E. Taylor, visual correspondent for Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, 
stayed on and off from August to December 1864, in a room on the top floor of 
Building 35, known at that time as Stipes' boarding house. The furnishings plan 
for this exhibit is based on some of the best evidence in existence for the interior 
of a building in Harpers Ferry during the Civil War, an original sketch by the 
occupant of the room, an accomplished artist. The exhibit will be located in the 
northeast corner room on the second floor of Building 35. Only one corner of the 
room will be re-created because the evidence for this corner is incontrovertible and 
virtually nothing is known about the rest of the room. A backdrop will re-create 
the low, slanted ceiling. Visitors will view the room from room 202, which will 
contain exhibit panels interpreting Stipes' boarding house. Visitors with mobility 
limitations will view the exhibit from room 210. The light level in the Taylor 
exhibit will be kept low, simulating evening. A visitor activated audio program 
will feature James Taylor's description of his accommodations as recorded in The 
James E. Taylor Sketchbook, page 30. 



Interpretive Objectives and Operating Plan 

The furnishings exhibit portraying James E. Taylor's room in Stipes' boarding 
house provides Harpers Ferry NHP with an ideal setting in which to interpret the 
life of a war correspondent in Harpers Ferry. Just as they do today, war 
correspondents risked their lives to bring back written or visual information from 
the front lines and, like today, this information helped to sway the minds and 
hearts of the nation. 

During the Civil War, Harpers Ferry was filled with people passing through: war 
correspondents, soldiers, deserters, people displaced by the war. Taylor mentions 
that he was lucky to find a room in Harpers Ferry when he arrived in August 
1864. The life of these transients is another story that can be interpreted in this 
exhibit. 

Most of the time, the exhibit will stand alone with an interpretive panel to 
describe the scene. At other times, guided tours could provide additional 
information about the life and times of war correspondent James E. Taylor. 
Taylor's diary and sketchbook will provide interpreters with a wealth of 
information about his activities in the area during the Civil War. 



212 




I 

& 

1 



Recommended Furnishings 

James Taylor's room, room 201, Building 35. 



Object and Location 

BED, double, gothic style 
(head of bed against middle 
of north wall) 

BEDDING: 

Straw Mattress 
Feather Bed 
Sheets, 2 
Blanket, Coverlet 
Bolster, Bolster Cover 
Pillows, Pillowcases, 2 each 
(on bed) 

HAT and COAT (on bed) 



WASHSTAND (against east 
wall) 

BOWL and PITCHER (on 
washstand) 

TABLE (against east wall) 

CHAIR (in front of table) 

LAMP (on table) 

INKWELL (on table) 

PENS, 2 (one in inkwell, 
one laying on table) 

PAPERS, including an 
unfinished drawing (on 
table) 

VALISE or CARPETBAG 
(on floor next to table) 

RAG CARPETING (on 

floor) 



Documentation 

Taylor sketch (reproduced 
on p. 211). 



Taylor sketch, p. 211. 



Taylor sketch, p. 211. 

Taylor sketch, p. 211. 

Taylor sketch, p. 211. 

Taylor sketch, p. 211. 
Taylor sketch, p. 211. 
Taylor sketch, p. 211. 
Taylor sketch, p. 211. 
Taylor sketch, p. 211. 

Taylor sketch, p. 211. 
Taylor sketch, p. 211. 



Rag carpeting was a 
common, inexpensive floor 
covering appropriate for a 
boarding house or hotel. 



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214 



Concept for Interpretive Panels 

Two identical free-standing panels will be located in room 201, one near the door 
to room 202 and one near the door to 210. These panels will identify this display 
as a representation of the room of James E. Taylor, a visual correspondent for 
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper. Newspaper correspondents risked their 
lives to bring back written or visual information from the front lines. Like today, 
this information helped to sway the minds and hearts of the nation. 

Interpretive panels in room 202, the anteroom, will address the role of boarding 
houses during the war and will describe the bustle and crowded conditions in 
Harpers Ferry. Although many townspeople fled Harpers Ferry, Taylor's 
drawings show that the streets were thronged with soldiers, transients, reporters, 
and others displaced by the war. 

The doorways to room 201 should be fitted with removable full-length glass or 
acrylic plastic barriers. 



Possible illustrations: 

— Taylor, The James E. Taylor Sketchbook, pp. 4, 31, 35, 215, 465 



215 



EVIDENCE OF ORIGINAL FURNISHINGS for Officer's Quarters 

Discussion of Sources 

No primary evidence exists for an officer's quarters located in Building 34/35. 
However, three of James Taylor's sketches contain pertinent information for the 
refurnishing of an officer's lodgings in Harpers Ferry. Obviously, Taylor's sketch 
of his own accommodations in Building 34/35 gives the best information about 
furnishings in other rooms of the same boarding house. Another Taylor sketch, 
"The General's Room in Larrick's Hotel," located in Middletown, Virginia, 
illustrates a typical public accommodation in the Shenandoah Valley. However, 
this drawing portrays an interior somewhat grander than the interior of Building 
34/35. Taylor's sketch of his lodgings in a local home in Winchester, Virginia, 
probably portray an interior closer in scale and sophistication to Building 34/35. 

An 1850 inventory of the United States Hotel, located in Harpers Ferry, gives a 
room by room accounting of the contents of a local establishment. This inventory 
reveals that the room furnishings became plainer and the number of occupants in 
each room increased on the upper floors in the building. 

Several illustrations of officers' quarters located outside of Harpers Ferry provide 
details about the personal possessions of military officers. These illustrations also 
indicate the level of sophistication appropriate to the furnishings of an officer's 
quarters during the 1860s. 

Excerpt from the Deed of Trust of James B. Wager to Isaac Fouke 

Schedule A, March 6, 1850, deed book 31, pages 68-70. 

This excerpt includes the inventory of the guest rooms in the United States Hotel, 
operated by James B. Wager. 

No. 1 -- 1 carpet & Rug, 1 large Mahogony Wardrobe 

-- Mahogony Dressing Beauro 1 candle stand & cover 

-- 1 Table & cover - 4 Horse shoe chairs - 1 mahogony arm chair 

-- 1 Towel Stand 

No. 3 -- 1 carpet, 10 Blind, mahog. French Bed. S. - 1 chair, 1 shuck mat 
-- 1 Bolster, pair pillows, 1 wash Stand, Pitcher, Basin Mugg, cham 
-- 1 Horse shoe chair -- 

No. 4 -- 1 single Bedstead, 1 Double dit, Shuck mattress 

-- 1 Feather Bed - bolster & Pillows, wash Stand, Pitcher Basin 
-- 1 chamber, 2 chairs, 1 Looking Glass, 1 Toilet T & cover 

No. 5 -- 1 carpet, 3 single Beds, 3 Shuck Matresses, 3 Feather B -- 
- 6 Pillows - 2 chairs - 2 wash Stands 3 chambers - 1 curtain 



216 



No. 6 - 1 carpet - 2 curtains, 2 chairs - 2 wash Stands, 2 Pitchers & Basins 
-- 2 muggs, chambers -1 Toilet table & cover - 2 Gilt Looking glass 
-- 1 Single Bedstead, 1 Hair Mattress 1 shuck do, 1 large Pillow 

No. 7 -- carpet, curtain Large washstand, 2 Pitchers. 1 Basin 

- 2 chambers, 2 chairs 2 muggs, 2 single Bedsteads, 2 Hair Matress, 

shuck do - 2 large Pillows - 1 looking Glass 

No. 8 -- Carpet, curtain, 1 [?] Bedstead, 1 do Hair matress, 1 do Feather Bed 1 Single Bed 

-- 1 Hair mattress - Bolster & Pillows - 1 wash Stand, Pitcher Basin, muggs, Chamber, 
2 Chairs 

- 1 looking Glafs - — 

No. 9 -- Carpet - mahogony French Bedstead, Hair & Husk mattress - 1 Feather Bed, Bolster & 
Pillows - 2 Horse shoe chairs - 1 wash stand Pitcher Basin & chamber, looking Glass 
Andirons, shovel Tongs & Fender -- 

No. 10 - Carpet - Single bed 

~ Hair mattress Feather bed, large Pillow, wash stand, Pitcher, Basin & chamber 
-- 2 chairs looking glass 

No. 11 -- Carpet - V. Blind, Double Bedstead, Hair & Husk mattress, Bolster & Pillows - wash 
Stand Pitcher Basin, chamber, chair, Gilt looking Glass 

No. 12 -- Carpet curtains, Double Bedstead, Hair mattress Featherbed - Bol & Pillows - Single 

Bedstead Hair mattress 2 Pillows - 1 Dressing Table, 1 Gilt looking Glafs - 2 wash stands - 
2 Pitchers - Basins, muggs & cham. 2 Towel Stands - 3 chairs - 1 Table 1 waiter - Pitcher, 
Tumbler -- 

[The following items were probably housed in the 2 large wardrobes listed, possibly located in a 
hallway on an upper floor] 

Table cloths 50 - Blankets - 24 pair Double - 20 pair - Comforts - 30 

Sheets -- Linen 

Do -- Muslin 

Towels 

Napkins 

P. Cases 

lot Stone jars 

Lot Glass jars 

2 Large Wardrobes 

1 Large Easy Chair 

No. 13 - carpet - 2 curtains - 3 Single Bedsteads, 4 Husk mattrasses 6 Pillows 2 chairs - 2 Pitchers 
& Basins 3 Chambers -- 1 looking Glass 



217 



No. 14 - 1 Carpet - 1 curtain, 1 Double Bedstead, 1 Hair mattrass 1 Feather bed bolster & Pillow - 
2 Single Beds -- 1 Hair Mattrass 2 pillows - 2 chairs, wash stand, 2 Pitchers, Basins, cham 
mugs - 1 Towel Rack - looking Glass - Table - water Pitcher TumblerNo. 15 - carpet, 
curtain - 2 Single Bedsteads, 3 Hair Mattrass 4 Pillows - wash Stand Pitcher Basin 
chamber - 2 chairs looking glass 

No. 22 - carpet - 2 Blinds - 1 Stove & pipe, 2 wash Stands, 1 Pitcher, Basin, Muggs Chamber - 2 
chairs. 1 looking Glass 1 Single Bedstead, Hair Mattrass F. Bed, large Pillow 

No. 24 - Carpet - Blind & curtain - wash stand Pitcher & Basin cham Gilt looking Glass - Double 
Bedstead 1 Hair 1 Husk Mattrass Bolster Pillows 1 Single Bed - Husk Matt 1 large Pillow 
2 chairs 1 Table - waiter Pitcher & Tumbler 

No. 25 - carpet - curtain, 1 Double Bedstead 1 Hair mat - 12 Bed Bolster & Pillows - 1 Beauro - 1 
looking Glass, 1 stove and Pipe - 1 wash stand Pitcher Basin & chamber - 2 chairs 

No. 26 - Carpet - stove & pipe, double Bedstead, Hair mattrass F.Bed - Bolster & Pillows - 2 
Chairs, wash Stand, Pitcher Basin, cham mugg - wardrobe - curtains 

No. 27 - carpet - curtains -double Bed S - Feather Bed Husk Mattrass - Bolster - Pillow wash 
Stand Pitcher - Basin Cham 2 Chairs Looking Table 

No. 28 - Carpet - curtains, Double Beds - Husk mattrass - Feather B Bolster Pillow 2 chairs wash 
stand Pitcher Basin mugg chamber looking Glass 

Garret - 8 wash Stands - 9 Pitchers Basins Chambers 1 Carpet - Blind - 16 Single 

Bedstead 

2 Double Bedsteads - 8 Single Mattrass 

2 Double Husk Mattrass - 1 bolster - 2 Pillows 1 Double Hair mattress - Feather Bed 1 

Single Mat - 1 single Feather Bed, Bolster Pillows 



218 



FURNISHINGS PLAN (Officer's Quarters) 

Overview 

Brig. Gen. Edward D. Ramsay reported in his inspection of buildings and stores at 
Harpers Ferry in 1865 that Building 34/35, a "two story, brick [building], located 
on Shenandoah Street [was] in fair condition and occupied as quarters for 
Officers." 1 This is the only site-specific evidence currently known for an officer's 
quarters in this building. However, the drawing for James Taylor's room in the 
same building provides very strong comparative evidence. The furnishings plan is 
based on this drawing, as well as on several illustrations of contemporary officer's 
quarters located elsewhere. 



Interpretive Objectives and Operating Plan 

Harpers Ferry NHP will interpret the Civil War military presence in the 
historically furnished provost marshal's office, located in Building 34. The 
Soldier's Life exhibit in building 15 illustrates the living conditions of the rank 
and file soldier. The historically furnished officer's quarters will show a side of 
military life infrequently seen by visitors— the lodgings of a military officer in 
private accommodations in a town. The presence of this furnished area can also 
lead to discussion of the fact that Building 36 next door was the command center 
for military operations in Harpers Ferry, which is why Building 34/35 was a 
desirable location for lodgings. 

Most visitors will view the room from room 202. Persons with mobility limitations 
will view the room from room 205. 



219 



Recommended Furnishings 

Officer's Quarters, room 204, Building 34. 



Object and Location 

BED (head of bed against 
south wall near southwest 
corner) 

BEDDING: 
Shuck Mattress 
Feather Bed 
Pillows, 2 
Bolster 
Sheets, 2 
Pillowcases, 2 
Bolster Cover 
Blanket 
Coverlet 

WASHSTAND (against 
west wall to right of 
window) 

WASHBOWL and 
PITCHER (on washstand) 



SOAP DISH with SOAP (on 
washstand) 

TOWEL (on washstand) 



MIRROR (on wall above 
washstand) 

DRESSER (against north 
wall between windows) 

TRUNK (under window to 
right of dresser) 



CARPETBAG (to right of 
dresser near trunk) 

TABLE, round (in center of 
room) 



Documentation 



Taylor sketch, p. 211. 



Taylor sketch, p. 211; 
United States Hotel 
inventory. 



Taylor sketch, p. 211; figure 
45; United States Hotel 
inventory. 

Taylor sketch, p. 211; figure 
45; United States Hotel 
inventory. 

Soap required for washing 
up. 

Towel required for drying 
off. 

United States Hotel 
inventory. 

Figure 47. 



Trunks were commonly 
used by officers to carry 
their gear. 

Taylor sketch, p. 211. 
Figure 45. 



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221 



Officer's Quarters, room 

Object and Location 

CHAIRS, 2 (one against 
west wall to left of window, 
one pulled up to table) 

TABLE COVER (on table) 



TRAY with DECANTER, 
WHISKEY BOTTLE, 
TUMBLER, and PITCHER 
(on table) 

LAMP, oil (on table) 



DAGUERREOTYPES, 3 (on 
dresser) 

SPITTOON, on oilcloth mat 
(on floor near table) 

PRINT (on west wall to left 
of window) 



UNIFORM ACCESSORIES: 

Sword, Pistol, Leather 

Accoutrements, Kepi, Sash 

(on chair against west wall) 

and 

Gloves, Officer's Slouch Hat 

(on dresser) 

OFFICER'S SACK COAT 
(on back of chair drawn up 
to table) 

OFFICER'S UNIFORM: 
Frock Coat; white linen 
Trousers; Vests, 3; Shirts, 2 
(in open trunk and dresser 
drawer) 

Riding BOOTS, with 
SPURS (near chair along 
west wall) 



204, continued 

Documentation 

Taylor sketch, p. 211; figure 
45. 



Figure 45; United States 
Hotel inventory. 

Figure 45; United States 
Hotel inventory 



Taylor sketch, p. 211; figure 
45. 

Figure 45. 



Figure 47. 



Figure 47. 



Figures 45 and 48. 



Officers used sack coats for 
daily wear. 



These are the usual items 
of clothing worn by an 
officer. 



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Figure 47. 



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222 



Officer's Quarters, room 204, continued 



Object and Location 

LAP DESK with WRITING 
SUPPLIES (on table) 

NEWSPAPER, 1 

and BOOKS, 2 (on dresser) 



CARDS, playing (on table) 



PIPE (on table) 

SHAVING BOX (on 
washstand) 

WINDOW SHADES, 3 (one 
at each window) 

CARPET, rag (on floor) 



Documentation 

Officers frequently used lap 
desks while in the field. 

Figure 45. 



Card playing was a popular 
pastime among soldiers 
during the Civil War. 

Figure 48. 

Required for personal 
hygiene. 

Figure 47. 



Figure 45; United States 
Hotel inventory. 



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Concept for Interpretive Panels 

The interpretive panel will identify this room as a Civil War era Officer's 
Quarters, and should point out the contrast between this room and the quarters 
occupied by the rank and file troops in building 15, represented by the display in 
the Soldier's Life exhibit. Both displays illustrate that officers and enlisted men 
tried to make themselves as comfortable as possible while in the field. Two 
identical freestanding panels will be located in room 204, one near the door to 
room 202 and one near the door to 205. The doorways to room 204 will be fitted 
with removable full-length glass or acrylic plastic barriers. 

Possible illustrations: 

— Officer's Quarters at Fort Sumter, South Carolina, Harpers Weekly, February 
23, 1861, figure 

— Officer's Quarters in a Casemate at Fortress Monroe, Virginia, ca. 1861-65, 
figure 44 

— 2nd Lt. Philip Reade in his quarters at Fort Dodge, Kansas, July 1867. 



223 



224 



ILLUSTRATIONS 



Illustrations are arranged as follows: 

Building 34/35 figs. 1-3 

Provost Marshal, figs. 4-23 

General Store, figs. 24-43 

Officer's Quarters, figs. 44-49 



225 



Figure 1. Three views of Harpers Ferry, March 11, 1865. Neg. no. 
HF-88. Courtesy of the Harpers Ferry National 
Historical Park. 



As seen here prior to the 1882 renovations, Building 
34/35 has three bays, with the door in the left bay. Two 
trees line the sidewalk in front. 



226 



Figure 2. Harper's Ferry from Loudoun Heights, 1892-95. Neg. no. 
HF-99. Courtesy of the Harpers Ferry National 
Historical Park. 

This photograph illustrates the crowded rear yard of 
buildings 32-35. Note the two-story shed along the rear 
of the yard, with a railroad car parked alongside. 



228 



Figure 3. Mr. Doran & his store, ca. 1910. Neg. no. HF-417. 

Courtesy of the Harpers Ferry National Historical Park. 



This photograph illustrates the front of Building 34/35 
during the operation of Doran's general store, and 
depicts the wide range of wares offered for sale. Street 
numbers are visible over the transom of two of the entry 
doors. 



230 



• 



i 




Figure 4. High Street, Harpers Ferry. Original location of provost 
marshal's office. Courtesy of the Harpers Ferry National 
Historical Park. 



232 



Figure 5. Floor plan (not to scale) of High Street building in which 
provost marshal's office was located, Harpers Ferry. 
Sketch by Krista Copeland, park architect; revised by 
Steven N. Patricia, illustrator. The sketch postulates the 
original room layout. Note that there were two rooms, 
with a fireplace in each room. 



234 



Figure 6. Citizens of Charleston, S.C, Taking the Oath of 

Allegiance Soon After the Evacuation of the City by 
General Hardee, from The American Soldier in the Civil 
War, p. 420. Neg. no. 92-27-4 1&42. 

Although the building illustrated is much grander than 
the office in Harpers Ferry (as evidenced by the carpet 
on the floor), this lithograph depicting a provost 
marshal's office offers an excellent example of spatial 
arrangement for clerks desks, types of desks and chairs, 
as well as details such as the flag and bibles for taking ' 
the oath. s 

The furnishings and details are more sparse than would 
have been the case at Harpers Ferry, since the title of 
this print reveals that it is depicting a situation 
governed by expediency: the need to administer the oath 
to thousands of civilians after the evacuation of the city 
by the confederates. 



236 



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1 




Figure 7. Issuing Passes at St. Louis, from Harper's Pictorial 

History of the Civil War, March 1862, p. 292. Neg. no. 
LC-1 19286. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 



The interior of this building suggests that it was 
previously used for commercial purposes, unlike the 
domestic building in which the Harpers Ferry provost 
marshal's office was located. 

Note that all of the clerks are seated behind one 
counter/desk, unlike the arrangement shown in figure 6. 
The Moulton documentary evidence suggests that the 
Harpers Ferry arrangement was more like the one in 
figure 6 than this one. Here the interior space is divided 
by a partition. The room behind the partition was 
probably used as an office. Note also the stove pipe in 
the back room and the hats and coats hung on the wall. 



238 



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Figure 8. Capture of Savannah — General Geary Issuing Passes to 
Citizens of Savannah, GA, from Frank Leslie's 
Illustrated Newspaper, January 21, 1865, p. 276. 
Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 



The upscale interior and the fact that a general is 
issuing passes suggest that this was not a provost 
marshal's office. However, issuing passes was a duty 
typical of a provost marshal's office. 



240 



Figure 9. Registered Enemies Taking The Oath of Allegiance At The Office Of 
Gen. Boiven, at New Orleans, from a sketch by Mr. J.R. Hamilton. 
Harpers Weekly, June 6, 1863, p. 357. Neg. no. 4420T. Courtesy of 
the Library of Congress. 



242 



Figure 10. Provost Marshal's Office, Alexandria [VaJ, from Miller's, 
The Photographic History of the Civil War, vol. 8, p. 245. 
Neg. no. 92-37-54. Courtesy of Russell's C.W. Photos. 



This exterior photograph of a provost marshal's office in 
Alexandria, Virginia, shows that it was located in a 
substantial building with a clearly visible sign in front. 

Note the sentry stationed in front and the crowds of 
people gathering. Although in this case the people may 
be gathered to pose in the picture, other documentary 
and pictorial evidence shows that the crowds are typical. 



244 



Figure 11. The Provo Marshal's Office on East Side of Loudoun 

Street North of Water St. [Winchester, Va.], from Taylor's 
The James E. Taylor Sketchbook, p. 157. Courtesy of the 
Western Reserve Historical Society. 



This sketch shows the exterior of a Union provost 
marshal's office in Winchester, Virginia, in 1864 located 
in a substantial building, with a flag mounted at the 
door and people gathered in front. 

Taylor claims that this was formerly the "ground floor of 
a tobacco warehouse," where Taylor stopped to get a 
pass. Taylor mentions that "about the office door was a 
group of Blue Coats." 

A sign is posted on the front of the building, probably 
stating that it was the provost marshal's office and the 
pass room hours. 



246 






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Figure 12. "Fugitive slaves mingle with Federal troops outside a 
provost marshal's office at Aquia Creek, Virginia, in 
1862...." (modern caption), from the Time-Life series, The 
Civil War: Spies, Scouts and Raiders, vol. 18, p. 30. 
Neg. no. 165-SB-46. Courtesy of the National Archives, 



Exterior of a Union provost marshal's office in a town 
unlike Harpers Ferry. As is typical, the provost 
marshal's sign is extremely visible and crowds of people 
are gathering outside. 



248 







IK^fl 



Figure 13. Sherman's Campaign — Provost Marshal's Office, Atlanta 
[Ga.J — Citizens Getting Passes To Go North and South, 
In Consequence of Gen. Sherman's Order For The 
Departure of All Citizens, from Frank Leslie's Illustrated 
Newspaper, October 29, 1864, p. 92. Courtesy of the 
Library of Congress. 



This provost marshal was apparently located in a large 
building formerly used for domestic purposes. Once 
again, people are shown crowding around the office, a 
condition probably exacerbated by the evacuation order. 



250 



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Figure 14. The Military Authorities at Washington, DC, Examining 
Passes in 1861, from Frank Leslie's Illustrated History of 
the Civil War, p. 199. Neg. no. 92-28-42&43. 



This drawing probably illustrates the exterior of a 
provost marshal's office, since examining passes was a 
provost marshal's duty. Note again the numbers of 
people congregating outside the building. Also note the 
awning, a treatment not seen in other pictorial evidence, 
and the provost marshal's uniform. 



252 



Figure 15. Provost-Marshal's Office, Department of the Cumberland, 
from Miller, The Photographic History of the Civil War, 
vol. 7, p. 183. 



No flag or sign appears in this exterior photograph, but 
the sentry stationed at the door is typical. Also typical is 
the use of a substantial building. 



254 



Figure 16. Headquarters of Provost-Marshal-General, Defenses 
South of the Potomac, from Miller, The Photographic 
History of the Civil War, vol. 7, p. 201. 



Even though this is a provost marshal general's office, it 
also displays a large, highly visible sign. 



256 







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R! 







Figure 17. General Lew Wallace Considering My Case [Baltimore, 
Md.], August 8, 1864. From Taylor's The James E. 
Taylor Sketchbook, p. 10. Courtesy of the Western 
Reserve Historical Society. 



Even though this is not a provost marshal's office, it is a 
good interior sketch of a military office. Especially 
notable are the type of desk and chair, the placement of 
the desk and chair against the wall (for privacy and to 
take advantage of light from the window), the stationery 
on the desk, and the bench in the front room. 



258 




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v 



Figure 18. General Sheridan writing his dispatch to General Grant, 
announcing his victory, at Miss Wright's desk 
[Winchester, Va.], from Taylor's The James E. Taylor 
Sketchbook, p. 375. Courtesy of the Western Reserve 
Historical Society. 



This figure, as well as figures 19 and 20, are good 
examples of military interiors in domestic settings, 
illustrating the use of some civilian furnishings. Note 
also the stationery and writing implements. 



260 



Figure 19. Sheridan Reading Mosby's Pronunciamento [Winchester, 
Va.], from Taylor's The James E. Taylor Sketchbook, p. 
563. Courtesy of the Western Reserve Historical Society. 



262 




n 







Figure 20. General Sheridan and the "Horse" Question [Lockwood 
House, Harpers Ferry, WV], from Taylor's The James E. 
Taylor Sketchbook, p. 40. Courtesy of the Western 
Reserve Historical Society. 



This sketch shows a more elaborate type of desk. 



264 




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Figure 21. General Rosecranz, Commanding The Department Of 
Western Virginia, Surrounded by His Staff, at Their 
Headquarters, Clarksburg, VA — From a Sketch by Our 
Special Artist with General Rosencranz's Command, from 
Frank Leslie's Illustrated History of the Civil War, p. 
156. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 



This drawing shows a table being used as desk and 
several slat back chairs, as well as paper spears and 
stationery. 



266 



Skw. 11, 1861 



FRANK LESLIE'S ILLUSTRATED NEWSPAPER. 



207 




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Figure 22. John Brown arraigned before Judge Richard Parker to be 
Sentenced States the Motives for his invading Virginia 
[Courthouse, Charles Town, now WV], from Taylor's The 
James E. Taylor Sketchbook, p. 55. Courtesy of the 
Western Reserve Historical Society. 



This sketch shows an example of a period railing, 
although probably more elaborate and permanent than 
the one in the Harpers Ferry provost marshal's office. 



268 



Figure 23. Plausible cartoon. From the Warsaw Collection, Stores- 
General Works, Box 1, Folder marked "Stores Interiors- 
General." Neg. no. 91-16300. Courtesy of the 
Smithsonian Institution. 



The Harpers Ferry provost marshal's office may have 
had a railing similar in type and positioning to the one 
illustrated here. 



270 



Figure 24. The Long Bill, an oil painting by James Henry Beard, 

1840. Neg. no. 1924.186. Courtesy of the Cincinnati Art 
Museum. 



272 



Figure 25. Billhead, H.L. Vervalin & Co., Rochester, N.Y., 1862. 
Neg. no. 91-947. Courtesy of the Smithsonian 
Institution. 



274 



Figure 26. Interior of a Country Store, drawn by Sol Eytinge, Jun. 
from a sketch by Miss Mary L. Stone. Reproduced in 
Harper's Weekly, April 20, 1872. Neg. no. LC USZ62- 
8434. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 



276 



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Figure 27. Letterhead, "Montony & Schoonmaker," Troy, N.Y., 1868. 
Neg. no. 91-955. Courtesy of the Smithsonian 
Institution. 



278 







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Figure 28. Village Post Office, an oil painting by Thomas Waterman 
Wood, 1873. Neg. no. N393-55. Courtesy of the New 
York State Historical Association, Cooperstown. 



280 



Figure 29. Account Book Cover, "W.H. Bullock," 1870-90. Neg. no. 
91-949. Courtesy of the Smithsonian Institution. 



282 



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GROCERIES, 

HARDWARE, CROCKERY, 

Hats & Caps, Boots & Shoes, 

aXjOTOKCIitTGh, 

JFauaoy Goods, ITotioxxs, <fec 



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Figure 30. The Country Store, an oil painting by Winslow Homer, 
1872. Neg. no. HMSG 66.2490. Courtesy of the 
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian 
Institution. 



284 



Figure 31. Interior of a Dry Goods House, James Beck & Co., New 
York, N.Y., 1855-75. Neg. no. 90-7976. Courtesy of the 
Smithsonian Institution. 



286 







- 
•-1 



Z 






Figure 32. Wood engraving of store interior by Alexander Anderson, 
MEYI, Scrapbook 4, p. 39. Courtesy of the New York 
Public Library. 



288 







riw 



Figure 33. Sutler's Store, Fort Dodge, Kansas, 1867. From Harpers 
Weekly, May 25, 1867. 



290 



Figure 34. Interior of Country Store, 1869. From Hearth and 
Home, vol. 1, no. 27, June 26, 1869. Courtesy of the 
University of Virginia. 



292 



Figure 35. Exterior of a Country Store, 1869. From Hearth and 
Home, vol. 1, no. 38, September 11, 1869. Courtesy of 
the University of Virginia. 



294 




sra£% 






Figure 36. Inside View of Retail Grocery Using Standard Barrel 
Trucks, 1875-95. Neg. no. 91-946. Courtesy of the 
Smithsonian Institution. 



296 




e/3 



err 



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go 

C3 



O 

err 



a: 
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Figure 37. On Main Street, by Jennie Brownscombe, 1880-1900. 
Neg. no. 91-945. Courtesy of the Smithsonian 
Institution. 



298 



Figure 38. The Country Store: A Typical Scene Found by the Artist 
Near Kennebunk, ME, by Abbott Graves, 1897. Neg. no. 
USZ62-15861. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 



300 



Figure 39. Account Book Cover, "Bennett & Sissin, Valley Farm," 
ca. 1895. Neg. no. 89-290. Courtesy of the Smithsonian 
Institution. 



302 



Always 



g 



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In account with 



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7 . 



DRY GOODS 



AND 



Groceries, 

HARDWARE, CROCKERY, 

Hats & Caps, Boots & Shoes, 



Fancy Goods, Notions, &c. 



Figure 40. Billhead, "L.D. & J. Collins, Jr. Forwarding and 

Commission Merchants," West Troy, N.Y., 1868. From 
the Warsaw Collection, Food, Box 3, Folder marked "C". 
Neg. no. 91-16296. Courtesy of the Smithsonian 
Institution. 



304 



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Figure 41. Advertisement, "Fox & Woodford, Wholesale and Retail 
Grocers," 1870-90. From the Warsaw Collection, Food, 
Box 5, Folder marked "F". Neg. no. 91-16297. Courtesy 
of the Smithsonian Institution. 



306 



45G 



FOX & WOODFORD, 

"Wholesale and Eetail 

GROCERS, 



3STO- 17 CENTRAL IROW- 
Ilend Quarters for Flue Groccrlesi 

STAPLE ATSTID F-A.3STC"Y. 



■<5i CANDLES 



STUART'S 
FINEST FLAVORED 

G REEH & BLACK TE &S, 
Bond's Trackers k Biscuit; 

Coffee, Spices, Saleratus, &c. 
Fresh Green & Dried Fruits ; 

I 3 R. E SE I=rv E Z5 

Fruits, Jellies, Jams, Marmalades, Ac. 



THE GREAT DEPOT FOR 

WOOD, WILLOW, RATTAN WARE, &c, 

18 AT 

FOX & WOODFORD'S, 

Whore may he found at nil time.*, in great variety, a large 
stoek, Wholesale or Retail; Wash Tubs, Tails, Keclers, Wash 
Boards, Can Tails, Mop Sticks, Batter Boxes, Wheelbarrows, 
Toy Carts, Clothes Frames, Hair and Wire Seives, Dish Mops, 
Measures Sealed, Babv (hairs, Willow Cradles, Baskets, Bird 
('ace*, together with a full stock of GROCERIES of every 
description. Call and examine, before purchasing* ewhere. 

FOX & WOODFORD, 17 Central Row. 



/ 



Figure 42. Billhead, "H.B. Foster, Wholesale & Retail Dealer," 

Concord, N.H., 1853. From the Warsaw Collection, Food, 
Box 5, Folder marked "F". Neg. no. 91-16298. Courtesy 
of the Smithsonian Institution. 



308 



Figure 43. Billhead, "R. Thompson, Dealer in Dry Goods, Ready- 
made Clothing, Flour, Grain and Groceries," Warner, 
N.H., 1869. From the Warsaw Collection, Dry Goods, 
Box 3, Folder 3. Neg. no. 91-16299. Courtesy of the 
Smithsonian Institution. 



310 




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s. 



Figure 44. Officer's Quarters in a casemate at Fort Monroe, 

Virginia, ca. 1861-1865. Courtesy of the Massachusetts 
Commandery, Military Order of the Loyal Legion, and 
the U.S. Army Military History Institute. Volume 44, p. 
2172. 



312 



Figure 45. Officer's Quarters at Fort Sumter, South Carolina. From 
a sketch by an officer on Major Anderson's staff. 
Harpers Weekly, February 23, 1861. 



314 



Figure 46. Lt. Col W. C. Ward's Quarters, 1861. Drawn by Alfred 
Waud. Neg. no. Waud Dwg. 837. Courtesy of the 
Library of Congress. 



316 




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\+^J*T:- 







\ ; 






■' 



*** 




I 



Figure 47. The General's Room in Larrick's Hotel, from Taylor's The 
James E. Taylor Sketchbook, p. 129. Courtesy of the 
Western Reserve Historical Society. 



318 







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■ 



\ 






i: 



«* 






\ 



Is 



s 



V5 






Figure 48. General Sheridan's Personelle, from Taylor's The James 
E. Taylor Sketchbook, p. 539. Courtesy of the Western 
Reserve Historical Society. 



320 







J) 



<5 



t* 

! 



Figure 49. Interior of the home of Mr. Joseph Denny, in Winchester, 
Virginia, from Taylor's The James E. Taylor Sketchbook, 
p. 560. Courtesy of the Western Reserve Historical 
Society. 



322 




1 















APPENDIXES 

APPENDIX A 

Inventories of the McGraw Family 

Notice of Auction of J.C. Mcgraw Hardware Business Inventory 

Public Sale of Hardware Merchandise Stock, Thursday, February 10, 1898, 11a.m. 
Spirit of Jefferson, February 5, 1898. P*ge 2, column 3 

1 nickel plate glass show case 

1 oak roll-top desk with gilt wire screen 

2 hanging brass Rochester burner store lamps 

1 cash register, slightly out of repair 

2 step ladders 

1 "Wonder" stove 

250 cans assorted paints and varnish 

5 gals hard oil 

1000-1500 lbs of cut nails 

527 lbs fence wire 

200 ft one-inch rope 

lot forks, handles and rakes 

window and door screens 

grass seed sowers 

corn cutters 

scythes 

grubbing irons 

tri-squares 

stock of chisels, augurs, bits, files, gimlets &c 

bolts, screws &c 
40 sets of sash balances 

(Note: considered a novelty - can be placed on the 

window w/o the boxing necessary for rope and weights 

locks 

keys 
1000 fish hooks 

oil stones 
box assorted spool wires 

3 bags lamp wick 

trowels 

castors 

husking pins 

hinges 

counter scales 

pocket spirit levels 
2 doz saw handles 

thumb gauges 

bridle bits 



324 



paint brushes 
coffee mill 

hectograph and other hardware merchandise 

20 shares Capital Stock of Bank of Harper's Ferry 

bar fixtures 
2 beer pumps 

water cooler 

gas pump apparatus 
2 refrigerators 

1 roll matting 

1 rocking chair 

1 bureau 



Inventory of Items Sold by James Mcgraw to Patrick Mcgraw 

James McGraw to Patrick McGraw 

Bargain-and-Sale 

Jefferson County Deed Book 39, pp. 396-397 

January 16, 1861 

Deed of personal property to Patrick McGraw for a sum of $2,306.23. 
Sale specifies: 

--stable & ice house near the Market House at Harper's Ferry $100 

-5 mules @ $80 each 

-1 mare @ $30 

-1 bay horse @ $12 

--1 colt® $70 

-John Brown's horse blind @ $20 

-1 sorrel mare @ $70 

-1 black horse named Rock @ $50 

-1 sorrel colt named Billy @ $70 

--250 bushels of oats @ $75 

-lot of boat gear, buggy harness, cart gears & 2 old saddles @ $30 

-1 two-horse wagon @ $45 

-lot of barrels & hogsheads @ $3 

-quantity of straw in stable @ $2 

-1 spring wagon @ $25 

-1 two-seat buggy @ $65 

-1 one-seat buggy @ $40 

-1 two-horse carriage @ $70 

-3 sleighs @ $7.50 each 

-2 buggies ($70 and $10) 

The above items are located in the stable 



325 



--3 barrels of tar (@ $2.25/barrel) $6.75 

--1 rope $2 

--a lot of barrels & hogsheads at warehouse belonging to store $5 

--20 gal. ethereal oil $10 

--3 lbs pork $21 

--8 sacks of fine salt (@ $1.80/sack) $14.40 

--6 pieces of old bacon weighing 108 lbs. 

(@$0.12 1/2 per lb.) $13.50 
-1 barrel superfine flour $6.00 
--200 lbs. crackers (@ $0.08/lb.) $16 
--1 20 gal. barrel of French Brandy (@ $0.75/gal.) $15 
--1 40 gal barrel Whiskey (@ $0.50/gal.) $20 
--10 gal. sweet wine (@ $.35/gal.) $3.50 
-20 gal. port wine (@ $0.75/gal.) $15 
-10 gal. wine (@ $0.35/gal.) $3.50 
-2 gross of pint bottles $12 

-2 boxes tobacco containing 200/lbs (@ $0.18/lb.) $36 
-50 lbs. candy (@ ?/lb.) $7 

-2 doz. of 1 gal. demi-johns (@ $0.15/piece) $3.60 
-m?ous and cigars (@ $5/thousand) $15 
-1 sack of coffee (@ 1001bs./ $0.12 1/2 per lb.) $12.50 
-50 lbs. cracked sugar (@ $0.12 1/2 per lb.) $6.25 
-1 box candles $5-lot of jugs and candy jars $12 
-?????? $8 

-35 lbs. green tea (@ $.40/lb.) $14 
-50 lbs. cheese ($0.12 1/2 per lb.) $6.25 
-counter (scales?) $1 
-stove $2.50 
-bushel measure $0.25 
-peck measure $0. 12 1/2 

The above listed items are located in the store 

Also listed is James McGraw's interest in two canal boats: 

"John H. Shaw" $300 

"Julia Anne McGraw" $400 
These boats are located in the C&O Canal and are subject to liens for the balance of unpaid 
purchase money. 



Property Conveyed by James Mcgraw to Trustees 

Jefferson County Deed Book 39, p. 397 

Deed of Trust 

McGraw to George N. Lynch, Wm. Walsh, Trustees for certain creditors 

January 17, 1861 

Property conveyed: 

-account book kept in late grocery/liquor store 
-cook stove and its operating apparatus 



326 



--3 coal and wood stoves 

—4 feather beds, bedsteads & bedding furniture, complete 

--1 sofa 

--one clock 

-50 yds. of ingrain carpet (imported) 

-3 looking glasses 

-3 tables 

-12 assorted chairs 

-2 rocking chairs 

-4 washstands, bowls & pitchers 

-2 bureaus 

-1 cupboard 

-1 safe 

-1 wardrobe 

-1 liquor case & bottles 

-1 set of Liverpool Dining plates & dishes, assorted & sundry pieces 

-crockery ware 

-wooden tubs 

-buckets 

-andirons, shovels & tongs 

-baskets & variety of other household & kitchen utensils 

Conveyance of personal belongings over to trustees to secure the payment owed to: 

-Edward Murphy $307 

-Rev'd Michael Contello (priest) $220 

-Wells J. Hawks $80 

-Bernard McCabe $20 

-Dr. Nicholas Marmion due rent on two houses & $600 

-Michael O'Shea $45 w/interest 

-A. J. Rase(?) $126 w/interest 



1859 Tax Records of Jefferson County 

Reel 50, Volume II, pp. 101-160 

James McGraw: 

1 slave of at least 16 years 

1 slave of at least 12 years 

4 horse, mule, and @$450 

3 carriages, wagons, etc. @$ 150 

$100 value of kitchen & household furniture 

aggregate value of $700 
amount taxed: $4.50 



327 



APPENDIX B 

Excerpt from Quarterly Issues of Stationery* 
Revised Army Regulations of 1861 (1863), p. 167. 



328 






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APPENDIX C 

List of Forms and Selected Examples 
from the Provost Marshal General Regulations (1863). 



Moulton specifically mentions the forms numbered 1, 2, and 5 on this 
list. Although Moulton did not specifically mention them, numbers 3, 
4, and 6-24 may have been filled out as well. The Harpers Ferry 
office probably did not fill out numbers 25-39, since these were 
relevant to the draft and enrolment boards. 



330 



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FoK.M 4. 



Iicj'ort of jnrsons and articles employed and Jit ml hi the district of , during tlic month, of , ISC—, l»J 

, — , jirorvst marshal. 



5 Name? of 

= i pcr-on- and 
c I articles. 



Domination and 
occupation. 



Sf-rvire during Hale (if Inn- or 
the month, cotupi n-atioii. 



A in 'I of 



l!i»i>»I. 



Tunis and the niiinuiil dm ■'"" , 



n « meni, or 
< nlr) itito mi 
From To Da>- Po!ls. Cl? Pui-nr v,ce - 
, in iiilli. 



iinl or pat Sli(min; lit win. in the t>uild-| remaining unpaid. 

P.ilt* nfr.-ntracl, Hy tehnm . in the mo. . inc- wert o ( cupe d,and for! 
owned. | what |iiir|»o>r, and iii'ir tl»c' 

I moi vvrc eroph'tt'd during 

Doll- Cts.' tin- month. Tniii*Ter« and From— To— D'll-V' 
diM liaise* will be noted 



under t It ■ ~ load. 



Amount of rent and hire dutinj the n. <r.th . 



Total amount due and remaining unpaid.... 



I ccrtift , in honor, the above i- a true report of all t lie pi r-Vns and articles < mployvd and hired by me during the month of , \irC-, ai)d that the observations ui.il. i Mm In ad of 

: Remarks,'' ami me si iiemeni of amounts due .:iid remaining unpaid, are correct. 

— — , /Void' .V.riW. 

Date . 

station . 




E s 



I!i inn long in custody last n port. 



Number arrested during the month. 



Number disposed of. 



Pent to 



Pent to ■ 



i nt to •. 



Si nt to 



'-. 



Remaining in cit'todj of provn-t in.-irsh.il, ' a 

or civil authorities. > 



S 



s 



s 



FOKM C. 



Kitum of the provost marshal's party \ and rfdestrters under eh arise if • , provost marshal of the district if - > 

far t/'if month if , l^G 



rAii'rv and ucsKitrcns. 



A I.I ii;a TlnNs SINCE LAST ISKTl'RN. 



l'l;i>k>T »M> »K!-l«Tl jiuhed. 



1 R«N-> I I HI D l'1-i II > Hi. I'D 



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nun li .ive. |. uvc. 



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Party. 



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\fltl 1 — Tin ll IV '"I 
nlmli Hll nllifrf j"l -. n 

ir.ni-f. mil, or M I" ii-il, 
s will bt In f. ni-iTIi d. 



_ 



Xuiiits of enlisted mm nouired, in tujdaiiution of " altt rations since last return," 4 T 



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APPENDIX D 

Pass from the Harpers Ferry Military District, 

dated Jan. 2, 1865, signed by A.D. Pratt, Major and Provost Marshal 

giving leave to travel to Bolivar & return. 



Examples of this pass and others can be found at Harpers Ferry NHP. 



344 




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BIBLIOGRAPHY 

The following references are described more fully in the sections titled "Discussion of Sources" 
found in this report. 



PRIMARY SOURCES 

The American Soldier in the Civil War. New York: Bryan, Taylor & Co., ca.1895. A pictorial 
history of the civil war by artists, such as Forbes, Taylor, and others; and descriptive 
articles by Rossiter Johnson, Gen. Fitzhugh Lee, and others. 

Ball, Horace. "34th Massachusetts Regiment Civil War Letters." Vol. 1 and 2. Bound transcripts, 
Harpers Ferry NHP. 

Brady, Capt. Joseph (Provost Marshal of Harpers Ferry). Records available on microfilm reel 40, 
Harpers Ferry NHP. 

Bureau of the Census. The Sixth Census (1840) - Eighth Census (1860) of the United States 

(1840), Jefferson County, Virginia: Ninth Census (1870) - Twelfth Census of the United 
States (1900), Jefferson County, West Virginia. Microfilm copy located at Shepherd 
College, Shepherdstown, West Virginia. 

Guards Pass written to Sarah Shay and Mary Mumaker, signed by P[rovost] M[arshal] L. Long, 
museum cat. #438. Document file, HFD #274, Harpers Ferry NHP. 

Index to Circulars, Provost Marshal General's Office, no publication information, 1863. 

James McGraw vs. Thomas A. Kirwan, Debt Appeal. Deposition of John Martin, 1866. Jefferson 
County Circuit Court, Charles Town, West Virginia. 

Moulton, Charles H. Unedited transcripts of letters and dispatches dated 1861-65. Typescripts of 
original letters prepared by Lee and Karen Drickamer on deposit at Harpers Ferry NHP. 

Quartermaster General Records. Index of Claims. "Congressional Case No. 9183, James McGraw 
vs. The United States, July 6, 1892." National Archives, Washington, D.C. 

Ramsay, Edward D., General Inspector, to Brig. Gen. A.B. Dyer, Chief of Ordnance, July 27, 1865. 
Photocopy of correspondence from National Archives Record Group 156 located in Map 
Drawer no. 10, Harpers Ferry NHP. (Snell's typescript of letter also available.) 

Regulations for the Government of the Bureau of the Provost Marshal General. Washington: 
Government Printing Office, 1863. 

Revised U.S. Army Regulations of 1861 with an Appendix Containing the Changes and Laws 
Affecting Army Regulations and Articles of War to June 25, 1863. Washington: 
Government Printing Office, 1863. 

Rules for Keeping the Principal Record Books Used at Dept. & General Headquarters. Washington: 
Government Printing Office, 1865. 



346 



U.S. Army Continental Command Records. Vols. 4/7, 8. National Archives Record Group 393. 
Washington, D.C. 

Union Provost Marshal Records Index. Microfilm #M345. National Archives, Washington, D.C. 

The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate 

Armies, Series III, Vol. II, Series II, Vol. IV. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 
1899. 

Ward, Joseph P. "The Civil War Letters of Joseph P. Ward, 34th Massachusetts Regiment, Co. E." 
Bound transcripts, Harpers Ferry NHP. 



PUBLIC RECORDS 

Wills, property records, and census records for Jefferson County can be found on microfilm at 
Harpers Ferry NHP and at the Jefferson County Courthouse, Charles Town, WV. Bound copies of 
will records for Loudoun County are located in the Loudoun County Courthouse, Leesburg, VA. 



PHOTOGRAPHS AND ILLUSTRATIONS 

The photographs and illustrations used in this report are located in collections at the following 
institutions: 

Harpers Ferry National Historical Park 

Cincinnati Art Museum 

Hagley Museum and Library 

Library of Congress 

National Archives 

New York State Historical Association 

Smithsonian Institution, Warshaw Collection and Hirshhorn Museum 



NEWSPAPERS 

The Spirit of Jefferson, the Virginia Free Press, the Harpers Ferry Sentinel, and the Farmers 
Advocate are available on microfilm at the Harpers Ferry NHP. 



MAPS 

"Plan and Profile of Proposed Construction of Class 'A' Road. State Project 3034. Harpers Ftn> 
District, Jefferson County, Harpers Ferry to Bolivar." West Virginia State Road 
Commission. Microfilmed copy, 1990. 

Sanborn and Perris Insurance maps (1894, 1902, 1907, 1912, 1917, 1922 and 1933 editions). 

Photostatic copies available in the office of the History Research Project, Harpers Ferry 

Mil' 



347 



NATIONAL PARK SERVICE REPORTS 

Chickering, Patricia, with Michael Jenkins. HAFE Package 116, Historic Structures Report, 

History Section, Block B, Lots 2 and 3, Shenandoah Street, Park Buildings 32, 33, 33A, 
34/35, 34A, and 36, Harpers Ferry National Historical Park, Harpers Ferry, West Virginia. 
Based on the preliminary report of Perry G. Fisher, July 1989. A Cooperative Agreement 
between the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service and University of 
Maryland. 

Interpretive Material for the Provost Marshal's Office, unpublished, Harpers Ferry NHP. 

Kissling, Herbert H. Historic Building Report-Part I, Building Nos. 34-35 and 32 and 34A, 
Harpers Ferry National Monument. U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park 
Service. Typed original, October 1957. 

Noffsinger, James P. Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Contributions Towards a Physical History. 
U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Eastern Office of Design and 
Construction, November 1958. 

Shackel, Paul A. "Historic Structures Report: Archaeological Component. Package 116, Harpers 
Ferry National Historical Park." U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service. 
Draft report. November 1989. 

Snell, Charles W. "Historic Building Report, Part II, Building Nos. 36 and 36A, Harpers Ferry 
National Monument." Typed copy, March 1959. 

. "Historic Building Report, Part II, Historical Data Section, Building Nos. 34-35, 32, 33, 

and 34A. The Samuel Annin House, Lot No. 3, Block B, Shenandoah Street." Harpers 
Ferry National Monument. Unpublished manuscript. March 4, 1959. 

. "Historical Building Site Survey Report, Part II, for Bldgs. No. 41 and 42." Harpers 

Ferry National Monument. Unpublished manuscript. June 1959. 

. Harpers Ferry Becomes a Fortress, Sept. 21- Oct. 6, 1863. Harpers Ferry National 

Monument. December 16, 1959. 

. Harpers Ferry Repels An Attack and Becomes the Major Base of Operations for Sheridan's 

Army, July 4, 1864- July 27, 1865. Harpers Ferry National Monument. January 21, 1960. 

. The Fortifications at Harpers Ferry, Virginia in 1861 and Jackson's Attack, May 1862. 

Harpers Ferry National Monument. February 9, 1960. 

. A Compendium of the Commercial and Industrial Advertisements of the Business and 

Manufacturing Establishments of Harpers Ferry and the Island of Virginius, 1824-1861. 
Denver Service Center. 1973. 

. The Business Enterprises and Commercial Development of Harpers Ferry's Lower Town 

Area, 1803 to 1861, National Park Service Historic Resource Study, Harpers Ferry NHP. 
1973. 



348 



. "A Comprehensive History of Armory Dwelling Houses of the U.S. Armory and Harper's 

Ferry, Virginia, 1798-1884. In Three Volumes. Harpers Ferry NHP, VW. A History of the 
Construction, Repair, Improvement and Acquisition of Armory Dwelling Houses, 1798- 
1841." Vol 1, National Capitol Team, Denver Service Center, CO. November 1981. 

Sullivan, Arthur L. "History Building Site Survey Report: Wager Lots No. 17-34, 1782-1869." 
Harpers Ferry National Monument, High Street Studies Series, no. 1, Feb. 18, 1959. 
Revised May 15, 1959. 



SECONDARY SOURCES 

Banes, Charles H. History of the Philadelphia Brigade . Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott & Co., 
1876. 

Barry, Joseph. The Strange Story of Harper's Ferry, With Legends of the Surrounding Country. 
Martinsburg, WV: Thompson Brothers, 1903; reprint, Harpers Ferry, WV: The Woman's 
Club of Harpers Ferry District, 1979. 

Bill, Alfred Hoyt. The Beleaguered City: Richmond, 1861-1865. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press 
Publishers, 1946. 

The Civil War: Spies, Scouts & Raiders. Vol. 18. Alexandria, VA: Time-Life Books, 1988. 

Davis, Alec. Package and Print: The Development of Container and Label Design. New York: 
Clarkson N. Potter, Inc., 1967. 

Drickamer, Lee C. and Karen D. Drickamer, comp. and eds. Fort Lyon to Harper's Ferry: On the 
Border of North and South with "Rambling Jour," The Civil War Letters and Newspaper 
Dispatches of Charles H. Moulton (34th Mass. Vol. Inf.). Shippensburg, PA: White Mane 
Publishing Co., Inc., 1987. 

Fay, Edwin H. "This Infernal War:" The Confederate Letters of Sgt. Edwin H. Fay, edited by Irvin 
Wiley Bell. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1958 

Freeman, Larry. The Country Store. Watkins Glen, NY: Century House, 1955. 

Guernsey, Alfred H. and Henry M. Alden. Harpers Pictorial History of the Civil War. NY: The 

Fairfax Press, facsimile of earlier (1866) edition. Originally titled Harpers Pictorial History 
of the Great Rebellion. 

Hagood, Johnson. Memoirs of the War of Secession: From the Original Manuscripts of Johnson 
Hagood. Edited by U.R. Brooks. Columbia, SC: The State Company, 1910. 

Hunter, Alexander. Johnny Reb and Billy Yank. New York and Washington: The Neale 
Publishing Co., 1905. 

Jones, John Beauchamp. A Rebel War Clerk's Diary. Edited by Earl Schenck Miers. New York: 
Sagamore Press, Inc., 1958. 

Lord, Francis A. They Fought for the Union. Harrisburg, Pennsylvania: The Stackpole Co., 1960. 

349 



Marmion, Anne P. Under Fire: An Experience in the Civil War. Harpers Ferry: Privately printed, 
1959. 

Miller, Francis Trevelyan. The Photographic History of the Civil War. Vols. 7 and 8. New York: 
Thomas Yoseloff, 1957. 

Moat, Louis Shepheard, ed. Frank Leslie's Illustrated History of the Civil War. Introduction by B. 
Carr. New York: The Fairfax Press, a division of Barre Publishing Co., Inc. Distributed 
by Crown Publishers, Inc., 1977. 

Patrick, Marsena Rudolph. Inside Lincoln's Army: The Diary of Marsena Rudolph Patrick, Provost 
Marshal General, Army of the Potomac. Edited by David S. Sparks. New York: Thomas 
Yoseloff, 1964. 

Patterson, Edmund DeWitt. Yankee Rebel: The Civil War Journal of Edmund DeWitt Patterson. 
Edited by John G. Barrett. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 1966. 

Putnam, Sallie A. In Richmond During the Confederacy. New York: G.W. Carleton & Co., 1867; 
reprint, New York: Robert M. McBride Co., 1961. 

Radley, Kenneth. Rebel Watchdog: The Confederate States Army Provost Guard. Baton Rouge and 
London: Louisiana State University Press, 1989. 

Russel, Andrew J. Russel's Civil War Photographs. New York: Dover Publications, Inc., 1982. 

Smith, Merritt Roe. Harpers Ferry Armory and the New Technology: The Challenge of Change. 
Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 1977. 

Taylor, James E. With Sheridan Up the Shenandoah Valley in 1864: Leaves from a Special Artist's 
Sketchbook and Diary [The James E. Taylor Sketchbook]. Cleveland: The Western Reserve 
Historical Society, 1989. 

Thompson, Holland. "The Provost Marshal and the Citizen," in The Photographic History of the 
Civil War by Francis Trevelyan Miller. Vols. 7 and 8. New York: Thomas Yoseloff, 1957. 

Ward, Artemas, comp. The Grocers' Hand-Book and Directory for 1883. Philadelphia: The 
Philadelphia Grocer Publishing Co., 1882. 



350 





U.S. Department of the Interior 
Mission Statement 

As the Nation's principal conservation agency, the Department of 
the Interior has responsibility for most of our nationally-owned 
public lands and natural resources. This includes fostering 
sound use of our land and water resources; protecting our fish, 
wildlife, and biological diversity; preserving the environmental 
and cultural values of our national parks and historical places; and 
providing for the enjoyment of life through outdoor recreation. 
The Department assesses our energy and mineral resources and 
works to ensure that their development is in the best interests of 
all our people by encouraging stewardship and citizen participa- 
tion in their care. The Department also has a major responsibility 
for American Indian reservation communities and for people who 
live in island territories under U.S. administration. 




3 1604 011 242 ' i 



89 







DATE 


DUE 







































































DEMCO. INC 38-2931 



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